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Carb advice from DiabetesUK

Discussion in 'Low Calorie Diets' started by HpprKM, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. HpprKM

    HpprKM · Well-Known Member

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    I do not low-carb per se, mainly because I have no idea what I would eat if I did low-carb! I do, however, try to eat carbs in moderation quite simply by having smaller portions. I should also say that I am a diet only Type 2, diagnosed 2 years ago. I know there are ongoing issues over the low carb factor with many people stating that carbs are bad for diabetes, and I can see that as they convert to fairly high blood sugar levels this makes sense, I also understand that this seems to affect some people and not others. However, having just been on the DiabeticsUK website I see many references to eating carbs as being important, for example:
    I do hope this is so, as I tried giving up my breakfast of porridge only to be stricken by hunger around 11.00 a.m. at work, around the time when everyone else is wheeling out cakes or biscuits, porridge helps me resist this temptation! Also, I have always loved pasta and rice, not ever been overly mad on potatos though do eat them.

    Views from other users please :?:
     
  2. Patch

    Patch Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds to me like you need to do some experimenting. Stick to your usual diet for a few weeks, measuring regularly (especially after you've eaten porridge - that tends to make BG shoot up). Then, try lo-carbing or lo-GI for a few weeks, measuring your BG regularly.

    You'll soon find out when your BG goes high, and what foods make YOUR BG go up. This is different for everybody. (Some people CAN handle porridge pretty well - but I'm not one of 'em!)

    Unfortunately, trial and error is BY FAR the best way of finding out which foods will effect you.

    Good luck...
     
  3. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    Pat is right - test, eat, test then test again. It's the only way to determine what is going to work for you. Although I don't restrict my carb intake as much as some (and I have pumped insulin to take care of what I do eat), the advice proffered by DUK regarding same seems utter madness, going against fairly basic science as it does. Although it's often quoted, I never see the evidence to back up the "starchy carb" advice?
     
  4. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    I do think a varied diet including all food groups is important and that includes carbohydrates.Strangely enough I feel that the world has moved on since Ancel Keyes and modern nutrional advice isn't nearly as flawed as some people who have adopted a low carb diet try to suggest. The newly written advice from DUK is much better than the previous advice which used to say to eat 'plenty' of carbs rather than pointing the importance of carb choice.
    Rather than try to explain in any great detail can I suggest this website . It contains references to modern research to back up its statements.
    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/index.html
    and either follow the links or go directly to
    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/carbohydrates-full-story/index.html
    However as you realise (and is discussed in the carb link) insulin is needed to utilise carbohydrates and if you eat things very high in carbohydrates you may not produce enough insulin to both utilise and overcome any insulin resistance so your blood glucose will spike. A way to help avoid these spikes is to choose foods with a low gi index, and not to eat too large a portion at a time
    To find out more about the GI index and diet .
    http://www.glycemicindex.com/
    There is lots of info there, including a link to a powerpoint presentation to the AMerican Diabetes association 'Practical use of the GI' which is a good summary .
    http://www.glycemicindex.com/
     
  5. FordPrefect

    FordPrefect · Well-Known Member

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    Ultimately for me after reading much advice from many sources I came to the conclusion that too much of any one thing is bad for you. A diet thats too high in fat or protein or even carbs without diabetes has its consequences hence I try my best to balance the different food groups and eat the same healthy balanced diet as anyone else and use medication to get the balance right between food/activity/medication in the management of diabetes. I really dont see the point in "saving" myself from diabetes only to die of the problems assocated with a high fat or high protein diet. Yes I test and try to find the carbs which have a more gentle effect on my BS, generally follow GI except where I have tested myself and find I dont agree. Potatoes for me dont produce the huge spikes in BS reported by GI.
     
  6. HpprKM

    HpprKM · Well-Known Member

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    This sounds like 'sound' advice to me, sorry for pun! :D
     
  7. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Hana,
    We don't really want a debate about the benefits of low carbing or eliminating grains from our diets on this forum. Words like, if you MUST have carbs" are not necessary here. This is a non low carbers forum.

    Moderation is the key for me. I am not going to be dictated to by anyone else telling me what is best for me.
    Try everything in the early stages and test frequently. That is the only way you will tell of the effects of particular foods on you personally. Ford Prefect's reply to the OP makes a lot of sense.
    Wish I didn't have a problem with potatoes :( :( I do miss them.

    Catherine.

    ( Moderator note. Hanadr's post's deleted after complaint)
    Sugarless Sue Senior Moderator.
     
  8. HpprKM

    HpprKM · Well-Known Member

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    Catherine,

    I really do tend to agree with you, if it works for you - go with it! I have already tried the no carb idea, really did not work for me, although so many would wish to impose the benefits on us. I try to eat sensibly, never did believe in bad diet, not that seemed to do much for me :cry: - cannot eat, and never have liked fatty foods. I do eat in moderation, and try to use Gi pasta etc when possible. Just been for my 6 monthly blood tests at hospital and awaiting results next week, according to what these are I may, or may not have to review my diet :?
     
  9. findave

    findave · Member

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    I would love to find any scientific support for the standard dietary advice for diabetics (phoenix's references in the main deal with general advice for non-diabetics - not the same thing!)

    I'm particularly interest in this strange lack of scientific support when we are more and more being advised to limit postprandial peaks of blood glucose, becaus it's increasingly clear that it's during these peaks that most of the vascular and cellular damage is done.

    Is there any research which shows that it is possible to keep these peak levels down to a safe level -say between 7% and 8% - without seriously restricting carbs?

    And is there any sound evidence to support the repeated statements by dieticians and DNs that a low carb diet for diabetics is actually dangerous to health?

    I have searched what literature I can access, and talked to many health professionals, but have drawn a complete blank so far Is this my ignorance, or an indication that it doesn't actually exist?
     
  10. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    .
    Well I'll agree with that statement.
    In my original post I referenced a very reputable source,( Harvard University) and in no way suggests eating a diet of industrialised foods. (I'm surprised that you seem to think it might!) the original poster can look it and use it to help make up their own mind.
    But this is the non low carb forum and not the place to attempt to start debates on the issue.
    I too agree with Ford Prefect... a little bit of everything
     
  11. Celtic.Piskie

    Celtic.Piskie · Well-Known Member

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    I eat a fair amount of carbs, i love my pasta and pizza.
    I've been diabetic since i was 9, now 25 with an 18m/o daughter.
    Hba1c has only been twice over 7 since i've got it under control, blood pressure, kidney function, eyes, feet all perfectly healthy.
    I really disagree with all this 'all carbs are evil'. I have a good diet, i am healthy, and my BS are good.
    My BS, and i'm sure most peoples, are affected by so many things. How much fat / protein is in the meal, the type of carb, how stressed / tired i am, when in the day i'm eating them..
    I tried low carbing. I was constantly hungry, my BS were terrible, and i didn't like not being able to eat my favourite foods.

    Management is the key, not wiping them. Test a lot, especially with your favourite foods. You're going to have diabetes for a long time, so work your ass off to make sure you can safely eat things that you love.
    If porridge helps you feel full and is good for your BS levels, then eat away.
    Try it with applesauce and cinnamon.... honestly tastes better than it sounds lol.

    Lots of things in this life aren't 'neccesary'.... Doesn't mean they're not useful or enjoyable or that they're dangerous.
     
  12. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    knowledge, testing and managing is the key to good control... Withot these no-one really stands much of a chance...

    Knowledge= Knowing about the foods you are eating, ie what is and where are the carbs... Good fats from bad fats, how all these different types of foods react in your own body, knowing what reaction you have with exercising...

    Managing= taking all this knowledge and working with it... So you know what a plate of pasta reacts and perhaps cut back the amount portion or saving that particular dish to when you know that you will exercise the after effects off..

    Testing= the only way that you can gain the knwoledge, and then managed the knowledge to your best adantage..

    I have a couple of mental notes/list of foods,

    The not on your nelly= foods that I am not going to touch such as Sneakers, mars bars or very high sugar content foods (with the exception of an emergnecy)

    The treat list = foods that I will have for a treat or special occasions, birthday, christmas cake etc

    The Time is right list = times such as when I'm working that I know that I can enjoy a kit-kat as I will work the effects off, or that I am going cycling, dog exercising etc...

    The what the heck list= this covers the times when I can't be bothered to cook, so have fish and chips or a fast food take-away which I know that I can cover but wouldn't have as a norm...

    I find that for me this works very well indeed, I don't tend to hanker after any foods or food types, my diet is pretty standard compared to most peoples, and yes I do have pretty good control so I must be doing something right indeed...
     
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