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CGM and NHS

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by emm142, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. emm142

    emm142 · Member

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    I'm interested in hearing from anybody who got their CGM covered by the NHS: why were you eligible to be covered, how long did the process take, and what did YOU have to do to get covered for it?

    Thanks. I'm just beginning to try and get covered, and I think I have a long fight ahead.
     
  2. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    It's not easy but it can be done. My consultant applied to the local Exceptional Funding panel with my case history. They refused initially but agreed after just one appeal. Took about 6 months in total.

    I have zero awareness of hypos and this has caused many problems over several years - serious injury to myself at home while fitting, and more than one car accident. Although variable, I can get down to about 1.7 mmol/l without feeling any side effect, and often it's too late. The flipside of this is my bg level can rocket (eg hypo-induced liver dump) into the 20s and I'm equally unaware. CGM means I can set an alarm level to prompt me to do something before I get into dangerous territory, both high and low. It doesn't catch all hypos, but I can prevent the majority which is just such a relief.

    I went into some detail about my experiences with/without CGM in a supporting letter which was presented to the panel as part of the case. But the support of my consultant was key in securing this funding, without his efforts I would not have succeeded.

    Good luck!
     
  3. emm142

    emm142 · Member

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    I guess I'm just really unsure about this because I don't go really low (for me "really low" is below about 2.5mmols) particularly often, and although I have had LOs (below 0.6) I've never had a hypo seizure or passed out. HOWEVER, the fact that I've never had a severe low in terms of symptoms is only because of really frequent testing. I absolutely almost always test 10-12 times a day, and have gone up to 18-24 times per day when my BG has been insane(r than usual).
     
  4. lionrampant

    lionrampant · Well-Known Member

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    CGM would probably be a good idea for most people - I know I would certainly like to try it. No matter how good one's control is, it can always be better.
     
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