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CGMs

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Holders9, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. Holders9

    Holders9 · Member

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    Evening all

    Been putting a fair amount of thought into getting a CGM and I am told the Dexcom G4 is the best one out there. Does anyone have experience of this or other machines? I am a little put off by the cost although I am not 100% sure what the overall cost is.

    I have also looked on google for a genuine looking site to contact someone about buying one but can't seem to find one!

    I'm type 1 for 25 years now and last HBA1C was 8.1 (previously 11) so just trying to get on top of this

    Thanks for any help or advice in advance :)


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  2. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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  3. Stefano

    Stefano Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi I am at present trying the free style navigator 2 CGM from Abbott . It is really very accurate I have to admit. Downside is that I already use a Medtronic insulin pump and the 2 devices don't interact.
    I have already tried the Medtronic CGM. It is a bit less accurate in my opinion but it interacts with my pump so I don't have to keep 2 devices in my pocket. The Medtronic CGM is about £3000 a year (sensors+transmitter) if you will use it continuously.
    I don't know how much is the free style navigator.




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  4. Glen

    Glen Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Freestyle navigator is £950 for the unit/display and the sensors cost £240 for a pack of 6 which last 5 days each.
     
  5. whompa73

    whompa73 · Well-Known Member

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    Coff coff splutter splutter bleeeeeeeeeedin nora . They know how to charge dont they. Is this self funded? I hope not (I'm type2 so it shoulnt be somthing I ever need ) but still wow
     
  6. VickiT11979

    VickiT11979 · Well-Known Member

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    I have the Animas Vibe pump & use Dexcom G4 with it (self funded). I've been keeping each sensor in as long as I can (apart from the first which I removed after 40 days as was scared would cause some internal scarring - it was still working fine & there were no ill effects on me). I usually have a couple of days break between sensors.

    I started using it on 9th May & am currently on my 5th sensor, which I inserted on 1st Sept. A box of4 sensors costs £186 if you buy direct from Animas (I think anyone can do this, not just Animas pump users - see insulinindependent blog for details of how someone did this). They cost more from Advanced Therapeutics.

    The transmitter costs £350 alone, or £500 as a pack with 4 sensors. It lasts between 9 & 12 months apparently, then needs replacing.

    If I continue as I am & the transmitter lasts a year, it'll end up costing £872 for a year's use. Not cheap, but not too bad - about £73/month. it'll cost another £350 if I need to replace the transmitter earlier.

    One issue is keeping the sensors attached, as the sticky starts to peel off quite fast. I use Opsite flexifix & Skin Tac which keeps it stuck for at least 4 weeks.

    It has it's limitations but is very accurate most of the time & has improved my control. You can see in advance if you're heading for a huge spike after eating, and see what effect different foods have on your BG. I used it more to change my diet to foods that cause less spiking.
     
  7. Ambersilva

    Ambersilva Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Vicky,

    How about showering?
    Do you have to protect the sensor from water?
    Is it possible to accidently knock the censor out of place when you are asleep?
    If the sensor does become detached is it possible to re-insert the same sensor?
    Does the skin under the adhesive become unpleasant?
     
  8. ivinghoe

    ivinghoe Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I self fund the G4 and have been using it since the start of July this year. I have also used a loaned medtronic guardian too. I am on novorapid and lantus injections

    The sensor is the part that goes under your skin, and attached to it is the transmitter which does what it says on the tin and transmits the data to your receiver (ie hand set or vibe pump)

    The G4 sensor and transmitter are water proof so you can shower without worry. The handset is splash proof so as long as its not actually in the shower with you it will be fine.
    It has a decent range too (much better than the medtronic guardian) so you can leave it anywhere convenient outside the shower cubicle. (Mine receives data even if its in the next room from me) The gaurdian was very poor in this respect and had to be kept close by at all times.

    The sensor is very secure and very unlikely to be knocked out. Most people add a covering over the sensor itself in addition to the standard adhesive tape thats part of the sensor. This is mainly because the standard tape can start to lift if you wear it longer than 7 days (as most users do). There are various tapes and surgical films you can use for this, I personally use hypafix which works for me. I work as a groundsman/gardener on a large estate and so far I have not had any problems with the G4 (or indeed the Guardian)
    If the sensor is removed it cannot be reused again even if it hasnt reached the end of its life as it will no longer be sterile for one thing and its too fine to insert
    I have had no problems with skin irritation with the G4 But the medtronic guardian on loan from my clinic did irritate my skin in the recent hot weather.. so far the dexcom hasnt been a problem, the skin under hypafix tape has been ok too.
    As a side note you can get the sensors cheaper if you set up an account with Animas. You need a letter from your healthcare team to do this but you will get all the info if you give animas a quick phone call (theyre £186+ p and p from animas, £250 plus p and p from Adv Theraputics) so its worth doing. You also need a VAT exemption form that either company will send to you. I still had to buy the system from Advanced theraputics first and am now just ordering up some new sensors from Animas.
    Hope this is helpful
    Alan
     
  9. VickiT11979

    VickiT11979 · Well-Known Member

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    No, the sensors are waterproof, and I've not knocked one out at all. It sticks out about 1cm, but the base is broader than the top so it's pretty stable as long as the sticky is good.
    You can't replace it if it falls out - once the insertion needle is withdrawn it only leaves a tiny thin sensor under your skin - about 12mm long & the width of a hair. It's not sharp & bends if you touch it. I can't feel it when it's in unless it's coming loose & moving around.

    The opsite is breathable, you do end up with some adhesive residue left on your skin & my skin is dry where the last opsite was removed a week ago, but it doesn't get "wet" or smelly underneath. I think it's possible to get allergic to the adhesive, but don't think it's common.
    Some people use Kinesio tape (google it), they try to peel off as much as they can every week & then cut off the loose bit & apply more over the top of what's left. I've not heard of any skin issues from anyone who does that either. You have to buy that, whereas the Opsite's available on prescription.
     
  10. Holders9

    Holders9 · Member

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    Thanks all. Am finding this information and advice all very helpful :)


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  11. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Vicki and Ivinghoe

    Although you've not mentioned it in your replies, am I correct in thinking that even though it is a legal requirement to do a bg test prior to driving a car or some other vehicle and again every 2hrs, does using a cgm give you both peace of mind regarding what your bg levels are doing while you do your journey?
     
  12. ivinghoe

    ivinghoe Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi
    Yes it does....
    I drive a small tractor as part of my work And the g4 is very useful as I can check on the go and I have set my lower alarm limit to 4.3 so I have time to correct before going too low.
    When driving I have it mounted on a small mobile phone holder so as before I can stop driving or look at the alert before I actually go low. I find its reading to be very close to my metered ones until the last day of its life when it wanders a bit.
    The Medtronic has predictive alerts but it wasn't very accurate for me and I had to keep it very close to the transmitter ie on my body rather than on the dash to prevent weak signal alerts from it.
    All in all the dexcom is far more suited to me.
    It's alerts are far stronger and louder too. I slept through a few alerts from the guardian even though the receiver was literally next to me in the bed


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  13. Ambersilva

    Ambersilva Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Vicki and Alan (Ivinghoe)

    Thanks for the detailed information.
     
  14. VickiT11979

    VickiT11979 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi All,

    I completely agree with Alan's post above re driving & sensor accuracy. I also tried the Medtronic Enlite CGM system with a Medtronic Veo pump & it was significantly less accurate, plus the sensors only lasted 10 days maximum.
     
  15. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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    Cheers everyone......

    The future I think will be in cgm as it could really improve the quality of life with diabetes so much regardless of pump or insulin pens. Pumps control bg from one direction and cgm and bg testing from the other direction and the 2 directions meet up in the middle :wink: :thumbup:
     
  16. Ambersilva

    Ambersilva Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have emailed Animas. They responded quickly and explained the procedure to follow in order to be supplied with equipment by them.

    I have one more question. I visit a record repository where it is necessary to walk through a barrier which scans for security tagged items in case of theft. As I write, I have remembered that this method is also used in most supermarkets and some shops. Does the transmitter on the sensor trigger a response from security barriers?
     
  17. ivinghoe

    ivinghoe Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In my limited knowledge of this its usually the case of what the scanner might do to your transmitter and handset rather than the cgm setting off any alarms as thecgm (and pumps) can be damaged by x-rays and very strong magnetic fields.
    I think you should perhaps ask animas that question directly and if possible ask the security staff too and also tell them you're wearing a medical device that maybe damaged
    I would expect it to be ok to pass through the scanners with no problems but I think its better to ask first.
     
  18. Ambersilva

    Ambersilva Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Alan,

    Thanks for your reply.

    While I am at the repository I sometimes need to pass through the scanners several times to get from one area to another. I shall pose the question to Animas.
     
  19. Lisbet

    Lisbet Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks so much for this exchange! Am in the process of getting a self-funded cgm and your various comments will save me lots of time and £s! My hospital says they can't support me and they've also refused a pump, so going it alone with the cgm in the hope that it will improve my control and help me managed my eating behaviour after 50 yrs of below average control! (The hospital thinks it's good, but they miss all of the hypos and hypers with my average HBA1c readings - plus they're strapped for cash of course and they think I should manage after 50 yrs experience...)
     
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