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Corona virus

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Lynz84, Mar 1, 2020.

  1. emily deacon

    emily deacon Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    what sick day rules do you follow? i usually just adjust as i go and see how my sugars are
     
  2. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
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  3. emily deacon

    emily deacon Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  4. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    So I work for a multi-national company with customers all over the world, offices in several countries and manufacturing activities in 3 continents.

    Last week, executive management tell everyone in the UK that due to the Coronavirus, international business travel is banned unless it is 'business critical' and then only with the approval of executive management. Nothing wrong with that you might think and I'd agree.

    Today we learned that we are expecting a 'team' of people to visit the UK offices, and they are travelling from - wait for it - wait for it - YES, Korea! And they're only coming to look around our UK manufacturing facility, they aren't actually doing anything that can be even remotely thought of as business critical.

    The lunatics have taken over the asylum.
     
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  5. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hmm, simalar stuff was happening at a company I'm working for? (On & off a few months back.)
    Are there any moves to replace staff retiring/recently retired or just moved on elsewhere. With phrasing used when enquiring about the new vacant position like "we've no plans to expand at present." Perchance? ;)
     
  6. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    Well it's possible as we've had a recruitment freeze for months despite losing several (very angry) staff members but as far as I know they (the Koreans) aren't staying long - but we'll see.

    Coronavirus has pretty much shut down our factory in Beijing and the office in Shanghai so at the moment the UK factory is working hard to fill the gaps and we've re-hired most of the contractors that we sacked just before Christmas. It's a crazy world!
     
  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Let's just say the "visitors" we had at the time were very focused on certain aspects of production including the non designated use of certain quality control testing equipment on other components in the finished product?
    But that was prior to the virus hitting the news... I was asked some questions that made me go hmmmm.
    That & a new CEO whith a "ye hah" history of whipping into shape & selling on?

    I feel the plan was to orchestrate a move of production "elsewhere," leaving the "showroom" for this high end engineered product associated with the city it was originally born? ;) "Flying the flag." So to speak. A lot of the components are already made elsewhere..
     
  8. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sick day rules, which you may have realised by now are purely for the management of ketones...........

    you give your normal basal insulin, bolus insulin for any carbs you have, corrections for any high blood glucose and then every two to three hours additional bolus insulin for any ketones you might see.....the amount of insulin given depends on the ketone levels you observe....
     
  9. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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  10. Shannon27

    Shannon27 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    They closed a high school near me for ONE DAY after they got back from a ski trip around northern Italy :banghead: fair enough, its enough time that they could all get tested for it but i'd be burning my suitcase :doctor:
     
  11. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    I honestly think that this is panic at it's best - the flu does far worse damage yet as we've never had the chance to track a flu epidemic so we have no comparison tool it's only because this is a new strain that the focus is on this variant, the media have really played up on this, just keep calm, wash your hands and carry on as life intended.
     
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  12. Lynz84

    Lynz84 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for this Juicyj!
     
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  13. derivadow

    derivadow Type 1 · Active Member

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    To be honest I'm concerned probably in part because this does look it will be unprecedented and because there are a lot of unknowns and although for the vast majority of people who catch it their symptoms will be (very) minor for a minority their symptoms will be serious or possible fatal (mortality rate looks like it is somewhere between 0.5-2%).

    If it's helpful to know, here's what we know at the moment (or at least what I know we know):
    - it was identified in early December from a cluster of cases with pneumonia in Wuhan, China;
    - the natural reservoir species for the virus is bats but it came to humans via an, as yet unidentified, intermediate species (some have suggested it was the Pangolin but we don't know). NB there are reports it escaped from a lab we know this isn't true;
    - the virus is in the same family as the common cold, SARS and MERS but it is none of these it is an entirely novel pathogen (to humans);
    - the range of symptoms is large from none (you can be asymptomatic) to very mild to serious, and particularly early on those symptoms are non-specific;
    - you are infectious even early on and with mild symptoms;
    - the R0 (the expected number of cases directly generated by one case in a population) is thought to be about 3 i.e. each person will pass it on to 3 others (hence the exponential growth in the number of infected people);
    - as a rule of thumb the number of cases in a jurisdiction doubles every 7 days;
    - in the 0.5-2% of cases where it is fatal the time from infection to death is about 30 days;
    - the characteristics of the disease means that is it all but certain it will develop into an epidemic and the speed driven by the level of infectiousness is probably unprecedented (60 odd days ago nobody had seen this virus);
    - as of today there is no specific treatment i.e. the symptoms can be treated but not the specific infection and as yet there is no vaccination and there is no natural immunity. But there is a lot of research in this area so this will change.
    - transmission is via droplets - people cough into the hands and transfer those droplets to surfaces for others to touch/transfer to their hands and from their hands to their face. This is why hand washing is so important.

    Although the spread is inevitable the impact can be affected by our actions now. The initial response was to seek to contain it (that is no longer possible) we are now trying to both dampen the severity and delay the epidemic because in doing so we: increase the time for researchers to develop specific treatments and vaccinations; push the peak away for the winter flu peak and dampen the peak (spread it out) so the health service can better cope.

    All this is changing very quickly so apologies if I'm out of date.
     
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  14. diabetic12yrs

    diabetic12yrs Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's not helping that there are deaths of people who were diabetic.
     
  15. diabetic12yrs

    diabetic12yrs Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    And that terrifies me
     
  16. diabetic12yrs

    diabetic12yrs Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No I wasn't joking
     
  17. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Sure it's a corona virus, but it's more along the lines of Sars and Mers viruses. The problem is it spreads easily and the reason so many are getting it is it's considered a "novel" virus, no one has immunity to it because they've never been exposed to this particular virus before. But your age (older) seems to play an important part in how sick you potentially can get and if you have bad BG levels..

    The first clip is very explanatory about the virus, it's a few days old so the numbers are wrong now. The second one is an interview with Gary Scheiner which most of us are familiar with.



    Stacey Simms talks to CDE Gary Scheiner, who lives with type 1 diabetes.
    https://diabetes-connections.com/the-coronavirus-and-diabetes-what-we-need-to-know/
     
  18. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I am working today and it involves promoting brands, today is hot X buns, here is a brief from my company regarding the Corona Virus, so not sure if customers will be sampling the product today:

    Coronavirus

    The Coronavirus is in the same family as influenza and therefore is only transmitted through human to human, or animal to human contact.

    The most common symptoms are: fever, tiredness, dry cough

    Some patients may have: aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat, diarrhoea

    To ensure the risk of catching the virus remains low, all colleagues should follow the standard guidance for personal hygiene, as recommended by the World Health Organisation, in the following way:

    • Wash hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand cleanser - before, during and after you prepare food, before eating, after toilet use, when hands are visibly dirty

    • Maintain at least 1 meter distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing

    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth

    • When coughing and sneezing, cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue – throw tissue away immediately and wash hands

    As a result of this we have taken steps to amend the sampling briefs for this weekend, please ensure you download the updated brief from NI (the portal) and ensure you are familiar yourself with the below changes to process: • We are now going to change to sampling on demand, this means samples should not be left on the stand and should be covered at all times. The updated brief will give you specific instruction for each brand on how to keep the samples covered and stored correctly. • Wash hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand cleanser – before you start preparing samples, before eating, after toilet use & when hands are visibly dirty. Please ensure you thoroughly wash your hands again during your break and after your sampling shift. Also, throughout the day at any point, if you feel you/the sampling stand may have been exposed to a cough/sneeze please ensure you wash your hands immediately and thoroughly clean the stand before resuming with sampling. • Using the antibacterial wipes provided, regularly clean the sampling stand throughout the day.



    In additional to this, we have also set up a Hand Sanitiser Claim Survey on NI (the portal) to allow you to purchase and expense Hand Sanitiser up to the value of £5.00. For now, this has been set up for everyone booked to work between 5th March 2020 and 5th April 2020. To be effective, hand sanitiser needs to have a strength of at least 60 percent alcohol.



    Further Information & advice and updates can be found along with the latest guidance and information at the following websites:

    • National Government (in the uk https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-informationfor-the-public )

    • National Health Service & World Health Organisation
     
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  19. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Master

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    All, a number of posts have been deleted for derailment and bickering.

    Please respect the thread topic which is about (fear of) Coronavirus in the context of type 1 diabetes.
     
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