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Covid and Work, Covid Advice and General Chat

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Max68, Jul 13, 2020.

  1. Max68

    Max68 · Well-Known Member

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    Well the ridiculous thing is to go digital the letter says

    "Use the camera app on your smartphone and hold over the QR code. This opens a secure Patient Communications Hub website that's unique to you, where you can select your preferred communications format by following the simple instructions."

    I don't have a smartphone, just an Android and there is no website/email link on the letter. I'm far from a technophobe but I'm baffled!!
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  2. Tannith

    Tannith · Well-Known Member

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    Me too. Even if I trusted it I haven't got a smartphone or a laptop, just a good old fashioned steam powered desktop computer.
     
  3. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Are there Android phones that aren't smartphones? If it has a touchscreen, camera and connects to the internet it's a smartphone.
    I suggest you download Google Lens which works very well as a QR code reader and has other very useful features.
     
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  4. Max68

    Max68 · Well-Known Member

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    Think I meant IPhone rather than Smartphone!

    Right have done it. My phone had Google Lens anyway but just hovering your camera (open of course) over the code doesn't work, for me anyway.

    What I had to do was take a photo of the code then open it in Google photos. Then there is a Google Lens icon I had to click and then it took me to the NHS site. There you have to place in your details but there is one snag and that is you are asked to put in your mobile but then a back up number which bizarrely has to be another mobile number!! I mean who has two mobile numbers?! I left that bit blank in the end and will cross that bridge when I come to it. They then send an email where you just click to confirm. Why they don't just include an online link I don't know, far easier.
     
  5. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it's what you meant but I open the Google Lens app (I have an icon on the home screen) and it activates the camera and I point it at a QR code. I have found Google Lens useful for identifying plants, finding where to buy things I have seen, bringing up QR code menus, all sorts of things.
     
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  6. Max68

    Max68 · Well-Known Member

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    If you point it at someone does it show if they have Covid?! That would be some App!! ;);)
     
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  7. JRT

    JRT · Well-Known Member

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    Worrying article in Guardian today about CQC inspections in care homes that had covid in building. Inspectors were moving between care homes with covid without being tested. Some inspectors got covid.
    The reasoning behind situation was that inspectors needed to inspect hygiene procedures in homes. Inspectors trained in infection control and had full access to relevant PPE. They were also socially distanced from staff and residents.
    This must enrage all those who have been unable to see loved ones in care homes.
    Of course there are many unknowns. You can only assume procedures were followed to the letter. I assume you cant say for certain infections acquired in care homes rather than their weekly shop etc.
    That said even pre covid inspectors were a discrete presence,they seem a sensible bunch who wouldnt put themselves or others at risk.
    If it was the case that they followed procedures fully and did acquire infection in home it highlights the need for rapid tests for visitors.
    On a personal level it supports my instincts that even with PPE and social distancing my work place was not a good place to be!
    Still,its a one of article that raises more questions than gives answers, especially with the advisability of Christmas get togethers.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  8. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Is there evidence to support that those inspectors who contracted COVID contracted it IN those care homes? Bearing in mind how prevalent COVID is and has been in some areas, I'm guessing they could also have been exposed elsewhere.

    Of course, I have no idea what the answer to that question is, but I'd be grateful if you would post a link to the article you cite for others to read too.
     
  9. JRT

    JRT · Well-Known Member

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    Inspectors moving between Covid-hit England care homes without tests

    Leaks reveal fears of increased infection risk for residents and inspectors

    Coronavirus – latest updates

    See all our coronavirus coverage

    [https://i]Robert Booth Social affairs correspondent

    Published:15:10 Fri 27 November 2020

    Follow Robert Booth

    Health inspectors in England have been moving between care homes with high levels of Covid-19 infection without being tested, raising fears they have put more residents at risk of catching the virus, leaks to the Guardian have revealed.
    In recent weeks all care home inspections carried out in the north of England have been of infected homes, including a facility where 38 of the 41 people receiving care and 30 staff – almost half of the workers – had tested positive, internal documents from the Care Quality Commission show.
    Over the last two months inspectors have been checking infection control procedures and care standards in up to 600 care homes, many of which were dealing with outbreaks of Covid-19, but the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has yet to provide testing. The CQC said on Friday it was expecting to start testing inspectors “in the coming weeks”.

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    Weekly Covid deaths in care homes have been rising. In the week to 20 November, 398 people were notified to the CQC as having died from Covid, up from 138 a month earlier. The death toll remains lower than at the peak of the pandemic, when more than 2,500 people were dying a week in late April.
    The situation has sparked “very real anxieties about contracting the disease” and spreading it between infected homes, the leaked memos reveal. One inspector described work to his managers as like “going into the eye of the storm”.
    In a memo to staff this month, the chief inspector of social care, Kate Terroni, wrote: “Many of you are undertaking two inspections a week, knowingly going to inspect services time and again where Covid is present … I can only imagine the trepidation you experience.”
    Some inspectors have been so worried that they have paid for private testing. Last month the CQC revealed six inspectors had tested positive for Covid-19.
    One inspector, who requested anonymity, told the Guardian: “People using services are at great risk during this time as inspectors are being sent out to services with a high number of Covid cases, sometimes a few times a week, without knowing if they are positive or negative. I think it is dangerous to the inspectors and the homes we are visiting.”
    UK care home bosses seek extra £500m for Christmas Covid measures
    The DHSC has argued that care home inspectors do not need routine testing as their jobs do not require close contact with residents. It has said inspectors are expected to follow proper infection control measures, including social distancing, use of PPE and hand-washing.

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    The CQC has been pressing the DHSC for testing for several months. One memo in October from CQC management to inspectors said: “People are still very anxious about crossing the threshold; about testing for inspectors and leaving gaps between inspections. Please be assured these subjects are discussed regularly with the DHSC.”
    Ian Trenholm, the chief executive of the CQC, said on Friday that the DHSC had finally approved the start of testing, which was expected to begin early next month. He said it would be “in addition to our existing protections, where all CQC staff engaging in inspection and registration visits must undertake a risk assessment prior to the visit”.
    He added: “They must use the PPE identified, have gone through training on its use, and have completed the infection prevention and control training. Where an inspector displays symptoms or a positive Covid-19 diagnosis, they are already required to self-isolate.”
    The DHSC confirmed weekly PCR testing will be rolled out to CQC inspectors over the coming weeks.

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  10. JRT

    JRT · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry,get the whole article above but copy and paste always seems unpredictable via phone.
    Yes,it pretty much poses more questions than it answers. How many inspectors? What precautions were taken? How can we be sure virus contracted in the care home? From my knowledge of care home inspections I would think that inspecting hygiene procedures would involve minimum contact with residents. I cant imagine inspectors taking such inspections without extreme caution, but who knows?
     
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  11. Max68

    Max68 · Well-Known Member

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  12. Hopeful34

    Hopeful34 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Am concerned to read this, as I know a care home in the North who had a recent CQC inspection, where at least one resident was asked a lot of questions face to face.
     
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  13. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    https://www.theguardian.com/society...en-covid-hit-england-care-homes-without-tests

    Oops sorry forgot my self-isolation from this thread.
     
  14. Max68

    Max68 · Well-Known Member

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    Well saw mum at the care home tonight and took the rapid test prior. Basically they ask if you want a nose or mouth swab. I chose mouth, and then it's a few minutes for the result. I thought it was taking a while so was getting a bit worried but it came back negative. The nurse calls over another member of staff to witness the result and a book is completed. Still decided to wear a mask, not sure why, probably habit, but got a nice welcome hug with mum which was much needed for both of us I think.
     
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  15. Cdean8780

    Cdean8780 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Update.

    I returned to work and was moved to similar job and I chose to move away from main hospital to a unit not physically connected to main hospital and which hasn't had many covid cases.

    I have been happy doing this and I am mentally OK now I think I researched to much around the first lockdown and mentally broke myself.

    Occupational health have screened me, they pushed for a risk assessment. Think they're opinion was for me to work on corridors but there's not just me vulnerable and we can't all go onto it and besides I am happy with where i am etc.

    Risk assessment was done basically not to work on a covid area or where a case is.

    My main problem has been people I have had to work with attitudes. Not only to diabetes but to diabetes and covid etc. And of course due to nature of my redeployment there is no official job so I get attitudes that I shouldn't be sown there
    I redeployed in the end to safer environment, similar job and safer location.

    Only problem has been my peers attitudes I have constantly had to justify myself, why I'm there, why I'm vulnerable to covid which not all believe cos its not cancer or shielded letter. Been told there's no hours down there so I shouldn't be there. Which type am I (all diabetes is vulnerable they think type 2 isn't and is nothing)

    Been going good but 2 out of 4 areas down here I've been told not to go on now due to my risk assessment. One of these areas a fellow diabetic has been moved off and told same(he had a permanent job on it). I get questioned why I can't go on it and get told I can by my peers. Management have said not so I don't why would I take the other guys place anyway
     
  16. Jbicheno

    Jbicheno Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think sometimes you have to stand your ground to get what you feel is acceptable in terms of risk in your workplace. My own experience remains the same. No new risk assessment, despite being requested by occupational health, still working in a crowded classroom. However, I am wearing an FFP2 face mask, I open the windows for ventilation (even in the cold weather). I socially distance as much as I can especially at break times, when I remove my mask to eat or drink, which involves me eating my lunch in my car on the two days I work after lunch. I’m forever washing and sanitising my hands. Nobody questions what I do, including the headteacher. It has helped my mental health going back to work now I have stopped worrying that I was going to be told to remove my mask.
    I think it is difficult for any type of manager to not allow you to take reasonable precautions in the workplace despite what they may want you to believe.
     
  17. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  18. Max68

    Max68 · Well-Known Member

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  19. Max68

    Max68 · Well-Known Member

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    Saw this posted on another site which I have to say did make me chuckle!

    “I’m not getting the vaccine, it’s a microchip so they know where we are”, says Jade with no qualifications in Microchips or medicine, on Facebook, via a smart phone, who uses Google Maps to get places then tags herself into the location with a selfie, listens to Spotify on said phone while walking there and sometimes jogs using Strava, gets localized offers from Groupon and Quidco and talks to Alexa without the slightest hint of irony....just convinced she’s right and the worlds best scientists and the NHS have made up an elaborate plot for most of the year with the sole aim of figuring out what night she goes to bingo and how often she pops into Tesco’s Express (where she uses her clubcard and credit card, the list could go on...)
     
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  20. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Well, about an hour ago I received a notification from my NHS track and trace app informing me that I have been in contact with someone who has coronavirus 19 and to self isolate for 8 days. At least I can knit and read my books. Daughter will go shopping for me, so that's good. So, it's either from the school or Morrisons, my local supermarket.
    I feel ok and have been telephoning my county council absence line,( btw both numbers ran out just as I was going to leave a message !!) so I have been texting and emailing too.
    I will have to call again first thing in the morning, so no lay in for me.
     
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