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daft question but can you put cinnamon and grated apple in porridge?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by captainpixie, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've had a look over the web but I don't think I'm phrasing it right and I can't find the answer anywhere :( it's one of my fav things to have in porridge and I'm hoping I don't have to give that up!
     
  2. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    Surely the cinnamon and apple can't be a problem can they?

    I would suspect that the porridge is the only problem. I just checked the box which is (still) in the cupboard and it is two thirds carbs.
     
  3. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    really, I thought that was ok to have! :( (I dont have the off the shelf stuff, we just by the oats with nothing added to it, it's a scott thing, Mum would go nuts otherwise as she's a Scott)
     
  4. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A lot of diabetics add cinnamon to their porridge. I don't know if it helps reduce BG levels as some claim but there's no harm in it. Apples are low GI, in the range 25 to 45 so as long as you don't over do it, I can't see there being a problem. The amount of porridge oats and the amount/type of milk are still the biggest determining factors.
     
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  5. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've always used skimmed milk if that helps and I don't have a massive bowl full (i'm going to have to use math aren't I? weighing things and scales.....I'm done for lol)
     
  6. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    I know a lot of people have porridge but I suspect they watch the quantity. Myself, I have Weetabix but this is just before my morning walk which helps a lot.

    Oddly, your reply above has only one sentence in it but when I quote it there are more.
     
  7. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Best to use your monitor if you test after 2 hours after having eaten your normal amount and it is too high cut down the amount until you are happy with the result it may tell you not to eat oats at all or you may cope with a medium amount
    CAROL
     
  8. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    oh I edited it lol!
     
  9. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I dont have a monitor or really know what I'm doing to be frank. my GP just told me NO SUGER until I go on a one day course thingy to learn how to do this (am Type 2) I'm just trying to follow what he's told me so far.I don't even know if I'll have to monitor it myself or not.

    My BS was 8. something (his words not mine) he said we'd pretty much caught this right at the beginning, he thinks i've only been diabetic for about 2 1/2 - 3 months and thats a good thing he says.
     
  10. ElyDave

    ElyDave Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    From a T1 perspective, Absobloominlutely - although the Scots may protest.

    A favourite breakfast of mine is porridge made with water, big jumbo oat flakes. chopped nuts and either berries or diced apple with a bit of cinnamon.

    As long as I dose approppriately it's fine, I even find my BG lower after a bowl of porridge than before.
     
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  11. Johnroy

    Johnroy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have with my wife each morning porridge with two spoons sheeps yoghurt either half an apple or banana between us and possibly a couple of frozen blueberries. Cinnamon sounds good and a possible option. This doesn't seem to raise my bg to much. But each person is different, here testing before and after is helpful. As a type two my doctors have taken a decision to fund strips to type twos. Though I understand not all doctors take that attitude. I was not given a meter until September and it has been invaluable to see what food has an effect on my levels. After nearly three years of not knowing what was going on in my body. You will read in this forum from many others how empowering it is.
     
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  12. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Probably a good idea not to have the porridge at all until such times that you can test to see what effect it has on your bg.

    Cinnamon supposedly helps to lower postprandial bg and there's been threads on the subject before, personally I find the taste overpowering.... so no-way would I put it in my morning porridge.
     
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  13. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    i have no idea what to eat and what not to eat to be honest. all I was told was no sugar. I looked at everything we had and everything had sugar in it and i freaked out until My Mum told me naturally occurring sugar was fine to a point ect,ect (she works on a diabetic ward as a HCA) I'm just really confused!

    the only time I like cinnamon is in porridge with freshly grated apple, yum :)
     
  14. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've pretty much cut out everything I would normally eat out of my diet. i'm trying to stick to things I know are good for me, I've cut out sauces that come from jars and any and all processed foods. but I frankly just want to know what I'm doing and it's driving me up the wall. there's too information out there for me to process as well and stuff I don't understand or even know if it applies to me, it's frustrating!

    I dont want to start asking questions to things that don't apply to me because that won't help! it may even make it worse :/
     
  15. Weird Science

    Weird Science Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have porridge every morning for the past few years without any problem, full fat milk as well ( semi or skimmed is yuck ) I could not go without my porridge, I have the jumbo rolled oats by Jordan, but have started to have this as my lunch as I am having kale & spinach smoothies for BF.
    As for what you can or cannot eat, like everyone has said trial and error, test, eat, test. 8 years on and I'm still learning, I think we are all in it for the long haul, your meter is your best friend!!


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  16. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Many GPs seem to tell us we do not need to test but when you think about it logically how can you know how your body reacts to certain foods unless you test your bloods after eating ?I suggest getting a cheap meter and strips codefree has the cheapest strips and test before and 2 hours after meals and see how you are going on
    CAROL
     
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  17. xyzzy

    xyzzy Other · Well-Known Member

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    Don't worry it is pretty straightforward.

    1) Try and get a BG meter if the doc won't give you one get one yourself the best value for money is an SD CodeFree that you can get from healthcare co uk on eBay. Once you have a meter your target (as set by national guidelines) is to be under 8 two hours after a meal and between 4 & 7 at all other times.

    2) Cut out sugar then reduce the starch in your diet i.e rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, cereals (including porridge) and other flour based things. Starch makes BG's rise nearly as bad as sugar (but you don't get told that DOH!). Eat more green veg, eggs, cheese and meat etc. You can use the meter to tell you how much starch you need to eliminate but try halving what you normally consume and taking it from there is usually a good guess. You can swap to brown versions of starchy foods they'll still make your bg's rise if you eat too much but they are generally not as bad as white versions.

    3) Ask loads of questions on this forum
     
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    #17 xyzzy, Jan 17, 2014 at 4:40 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 17, 2014
  18. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    I'm not a type 2 so wouldn't advise on diet Captainpixie, if you look at the information that Daisy (forum moderator) gives out in her introductory post it will give you a good idea of what to cut out until such times that you find your own way.

    Good luck and hope things make more sense soon!
     
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  19. popsy

    popsy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can't even look at porridge let alone eat it. It sends my BG way up, my doctor was surprised, she said "But we recommend it because it's low GI" which of course it is. I was devastated, I loved my porridge with just water and a few sultanas but all of that's a no-no now...except water of course ;) If it turns out you can have porridge, I can't see any harm at all in cinnamon and a very wee bit of grated apple. I can't have apple either, at least not much. :(

    I don't think you can do better than the advice from xyzzy and you can't go past a BG meter. I wouldn't have a clue about anything without mine. Try to get one if it's humanly possible :)

    Good Luck!
     
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  20. captainpixie

    captainpixie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    thanks guy's. I have a funny feeling I'm going to be doing a lot of reading the next few days! make's a change from book reading, mind you I could use the brak, I'm halfway thru Dragons of Pern right now and it's giving me a heck of a headache keeping up with the time lines :)
     
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