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Depression and Diabetes Q&A

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Administrator, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. Administrator

    Administrator Family member · Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Administrator

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    On Thursday 23rd April, Dav Panesar – an expert in the field of Mindfulness based therapies - will be answering any questions from patients and carers of the diabetes community from 7pm-8pm. Users will have the choice of sending in their questions in advance on this forum but we also welcome you to join in the live Q&A over on our Twitter and Facebook pages.

    As part of Depression Awareness Week (20-26 April), Dav will be looking at techniques and tools that the diabetes community can use to deal with depression, anxiety and diabetes related emotional distress including burnout.

    As a teacher, facilitator, researcher and consultant with over 20 years of teaching experience, Dav is skilled in incorporating mindfulness within the businesses, education and health sector. His focus and research has been on the application of Mindfulness based approaches for those suffering from diseases such as cancer and diabetes, in addition to mental health including stress, anxiety and depression.

    Research shows that people with diabetes are three times more likely to suffer depression than the general population and are 29% more likely to have depression compared with people without diabetes - this rises to 53% for those with Type 1 diabetes.

    Please post your questions here, and we'll put them to Dav on the day of the Q&A - this thread will be updated with replies to your questions after the Q&A has ended. Alternatively, you can follow along live on Twitter or Facebook.
     
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  2. neverforever

    neverforever Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi
    I would be interested to know Davs opinion as to why there is an apparent increase in depression among diabetics. Would he consider this to be due to physiological problems or the general struggle to accept lifestyle changes etc? Thank you.
     
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  3. Sandraj1908

    Sandraj1908 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I am interested to find out how to deal with low white blood cell count reducing my immune system ontop of the problems diabetes has with infections etc and a B12 deficiency due to metformin which can and has increased the level of my depression which I have due to diabetes and what the best route would be to take to remedy the B12 and improve my mood. I have been feeling like this for the past 9 months and would like to get off the hamster wheel and get back to some sort of normality so any advice would be great. Thank you in advance
     
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  4. fleurtess

    fleurtess Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I don't have time to think about myself. I look after my dear husband who has Alzheimers. Why are Drs ignoring older patients who are diabetic. I am just supposed to cope with it and everything else too.
     
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  5. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    As a non diabetic with a wife that has T2, I would like to know, a symptom of high blood glucose levels and also low blood glucose levels can give give you depression. My wife has been close to depression and has virtually withdrawn from social activity. Whereas myself with RH, because of the constant hypos I had depression but as soon as my levels normalised, it went away quite quickly?

    Can he explain why?
     
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  6. Keturah

    Keturah Type 1 · Member

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    I've been T1 for coming up 20 years and have never been told or talked to about depression by diabetic Drs or nurses. I wish I'd been told sooner, this is the first time I've heard anything about it.
     
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  7. fleurtess

    fleurtess Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You and me both. Although I only became T1 at 65 3 years ago and my Dr has never spoken to me about depression and diabetes
     
  8. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    I would like to know if Dav thinks that vitamin d deficiency should be tested in all diabetics as Vit D certainly lifts my mood.. And research suggests that diabetics lack vitamin D.

    Is Dav aware of Vit D tests not being carried out now despite a diabetic consultant requesting it based on orthapaedic evidence & recommendations?

    What are Dav's thoughts on this?

    I certainly personally believe Vit D is the sunshine drug and helped me out of depression when I was amongst the 53% for a very long time...
     
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    #8 donnellysdogs, Apr 21, 2015 at 9:47 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 21, 2015
  9. trudds

    trudds Type 1 · Member

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    I have had T1for 22 years and had depression pretty much all this time. When I have talked to my Dr or consultant and said I believed there was a link It was dismissed. I have been through CBT taken plenty of different medication. I am now finding my own way which is a struggle, the one thing I have found that has helped is being open about my mental health issues with everybody around you, even if the Dr's won't recognise that there is a link. My question is how can we change our professionals way of thinking if they will not accept that there is a link and what we are telling them?
     
  10. trudds

    trudds Type 1 · Member

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    I was tested for vit d and I must say it really did lift my mood, but when I went to see another Dr for a repeat I was told it is summer I should be ok now, however 2 months later my low mood came back
     
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  11. fleurtess

    fleurtess Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I am seeing my Dr tomorrow and am going to ask for a vitD blood test. Thank you for the information
     
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  12. mrspuddleduck

    mrspuddleduck · Guest

    Thanks interesting. I have had severe chronic vit D deficiency for years, and also have Pernicious anaemia. Never had a doctor link either to diabetes. Have been told that the pernicious anaemia might make me feel 'abit low' but no link to depression either.
     
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  13. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Please let me know if you get a test. Mine was refused by the Laboratory as it quoted it not being done at all now due to the osteoporisis research....
     
  14. colin5678

    colin5678 Type 1 · Member

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    HI. Been Type 1 for 20 years, now aged 58 and diagnosed with depression and PTSD(ex forces) at the beginning of the year.Getting CBT but only because an A&E doctor noticed and referred me.When I see my specialist nurse I have to fill a form in about my feelings. Ticked the boxes saying feeling low but nothing changed. Guess unless your feeling suicidal nothing is done.
     
  15. fleurtess

    fleurtess Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I saw a locum Dr Who seemed to know about diabetes and complications like depression, painful feet and toes. I've had a blood test for vitamin D, B12 and thyroid too. He said it sounds like I have developed neuropathy even though my levels are well controlled. He asked me what my levels were this morning when I told him 5.8 he was very pleased. Pity he is a locum. I will get blood results back in a week
     
  16. Administrator

    Administrator Family member · Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Dav Panesar replied:
    Unfortunately, many of these professionals have been schooled into thinking that the mind and body are NOT connected. Nothing could be further from the truth, our mind is directly connected to our body. Anyone who has experienced fear or anger knows the changes that place in the body, with increase blood pressure, faster heart rate, perspiration, faster breathing and a host of changes within our body such as release of cortisol, adrenaline, in addition to the 20 or so cocktail of chemicals and hormones.

    It is not depression which creates negative thought patterns, but negative thought which give rise to symptoms such as anxiety, fear, resentment, anger, hopelessness, loss of sleep, loss of appetite etc. All of these are the result of feeling under “threat”, which triggers the bodys flight-fight-freeze response system.

    The flight-fight-freeze system activates the body to respond to this “threat” by releasing adrenaline, cortisol and epinephrine. Cortisol is shown to affect the metabolic system and play a role in depression and hypertension. Stress hormones act by mobilizing energy from storage to muscles, increasing heart rate, blood pressure and breathing rate and shutting down metabolic processes such as digestion, reproduction, growth and immunity.

    Mindfulness practice helps to de-activate the “threat” or “flight-fight-freeze system”, helping the body to restore its homeostasis.

    As more evidence comes to light demonstrating the mind-body connection and the influence of right-mindfulness intervention in cultivating a healthy mental state and its impact on disease and illness will influence professionals in their understanding of psycho-physiology and its treatment.

    Dav Panesar replied:
    Hi Sandraj, from a mindfulness perspective: Our mental states have a direct impact on our body, including its physiology, immunity and biochemistry. Many studies in the fields of positive psychology have shown that certain mental states, such as gratitude, compassion and optimism significantly improve immune system function. On the other hand, stress, anxiety and depression have shown to impair the body’s immune system.

    Mindfulness practice provided through an experienced teacher will inevitably lead you to experience states of peace and calmness. It is from this point, that through right-mindfulness practice and guidance, one is able to cultivate self-compassion, compassion, gratitude and optimism over a period of time. All the while deepening their experience of peace, contentment and learning to switch off their “flight-fight-freeze system” which impacts our immune system. It would help to first switch-off the "threat" system, which is experienced as anxiety, stress and depression. In terms of B12 and other dietary requirements, one would need to consult their GP. However, it helps to begin with yourself and cultivate the conditions to allow the body to retire its homeostatic balance.

    Dav Panesar replied:
    Several factors are associated with increased risk of depression. Vitamin D deficiency has been proposed as one such risk. To better understand the relationship between vitamin D and depression a recent study posed 3 questions:

    1. Is vitamin D deficiency a risk factor for depression?
    2. Does vitamin D deficiency cause depression?
    3. Does vitamin D supplementation relieve depression symptoms?

    Their findings were
    The evidence for a cross-sectional association between vitamin D deficiency and depression is weak.
    • Cohort studies of vitamin D deficiency showed an increased risk of depression at follow-up.
    • Oral supplements of vitamin D showed no effect on depression symptoms.
    • The quality of evidence for vitamin D and depression is poor.
    • Well-designed, large clinical trials are needed to understand the effects of vitamin D on depression.

    My own thoughts are that a healthy diet devoid of processed food combined with sustained activity and mindfulness helps the body restore its internal biochemical balance, reducing the damaging impact of stress or threat based hormones such as cortisol and their unhealthy impact on the body's physiology.

    Dav Panesar replied:
    Hi Fleurtess, both mindfulness and transcendental meditation have been shown to be of great value to carers of patients. The stress of caring gives rise to many other problems, mindfulness helps reduce the harmful impact of stress, anxiety, anger and fear.

    Dav Panesar replied:
    Hi Neverforever, depression can have multiple triggers, however, chronic stress, processed food and a non-active life style are all major factors in depression. It is important to recognise how our mental habits of rumination, continuously replaying thoughts which make one feel threatened or under stress will contribute to the onset of depression. Mindfulness works because it teaches us to maintain our focus on the present moment, here and now, rather than have it fused with the content of our mind, or our thoughts.
     
  17. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Totally agree with all aspects of mindfulness... A counsellor talked to me about mindfulness and I've mentioned it on various posts a while back.

    Totally agree with not eating processed foods too.
     
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