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Diabetes Burnout.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by catherinecherub, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

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  2. Cowboyjim

    Cowboyjim · Well-Known Member

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    Good stuff. Think I am doing most of those, my wife helps a lot even tho I insist we don't have individual meals... just one in four in a family with the lurgi still hard work.
    Not sure how I would cope if I worked in an office etc every day. Working at home is a great help with routine etc. 8)
     
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  3. twisted imaginings

    twisted imaginings · Newbie

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    I think this is exactly where I am at the moment, nothing seems to work...my dipstix always show a high reading and I really don't care any more - the other night, the exact words I used, were " oh well, if it kills me, it kills me". I haven't been diagnosed for long - only since last November, but I've had enough :cry:
     
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  4. Cowboyjim

    Cowboyjim · Well-Known Member

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    I think that most of us likely go through this period of frustration if not worse. And I still have times when I feel like giving up. But with support and little victories progress will come... Though it is also like a religion where you think everyone else are "unbelievers" full of the wrong stereotype impressions of what DM is and yet still ready to dispense advice and experiences.... yawn... it is or can be a lonelier life... the answer is simple tho. Persistence.
    I was impatient for progress maybe even a solution and got very cross. But I have never given up. It is I think appropriate to get a new balance. Try to look at it longer term. You WILL succeed but it may take a year before you really can look back and wonder why you got the way you are now.
    I call it the tyranny of numbers. Stupid digits on a tiny screen ruling our lives and bring joy or misery. This is of course nonsense. It is in our heads, it is a state of mind. And therein lies the answer to your frustration. Keep trying and maybe different tacks are needed. Maybe you simply need to get organised and do a table and keep filling it in day by day for a month say and be detached a bit more. Go back and revise based on the trends that will appear... it probably needs a different menu or a change in relative amounts. And you can always put what you do up here for feedback.
    All the best... ! 8)
     
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  5. twisted imaginings

    twisted imaginings · Newbie

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    thanks for your reply cowboy jim - I appreciate it and will definitely look into the chart...there is just so much going on right now in my life and it just feels like an uphill struggle every day :?
     
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  6. Cowboyjim

    Cowboyjim · Well-Known Member

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    DM is all about priorities... but it casts a long shadow... it can be beaten into submission... let yourself off the hook for a bit, it will repay you, days go by and things change. 8)
     
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  7. Scoop4

    Scoop4 · Well-Known Member

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    Just remember you are not the only one to go through this and the things you have thought and felt shave a lot of others. Just to say I have sat and cried saying all I want i want is a moments peace when I have gone 24 hours in a hypo state. But I am still here after 17 years and I am still fighting. Don't left your head win.
     
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  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    yep well said Scoop... it is just a case of fighting on with any chronic illness really. I'm currently dealing with diabetes and some severe stomach/oesophagus problem and this year in particular has been real hard as it's probably the first time my mental state has really been affected a great deal. I'm usually a strong person... but now into my 5th year of so many symptoms and lack of sleep... and trying to manage diabetes has almost done my head in. :cry: I just want out sometimes.... but there is no out really is there... so fighting is what it takes. Diabetes in itself is enough to deal with... having other stuff on top of it makes it harder.
     
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  9. Brit90

    Brit90 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I am a head of you there, I've been on a destructive course for more than 3 years now... nothing changes.

    I don't even live in England anymore, so I don't have access to any help. It will kill me, I know... but being depressed you can never see the brighter side of life, especially when you are alone.

    I hope you get through it, because I don't hold much hope for me.

    Sometimes, just sometimes, I feel like yes the light at the end of the tunnel is here, then it fades away to blackness
     
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  10. RoyG

    RoyG · Well-Known Member

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    Brit90 you have to get off that train wreck, The fact is you do have access to some help right here. I would really suggest you see a Doctor with regards your Depression friend, as you may need a little help to pull out of it, Sadly no one can make you change track just advise.
    But why waste all this time making things worse when you could be making life better. Keep focusing on that light and heading towards it, Trust me you will get to it, but you have to want to. I have had my share of life's trials and misery, having a motorcycle accident at 21 and nearly dying spending over a month in hospital and not enjoying life for 18 months. the marriage break ups; and a few more, thinking how can it ever get better, and now type 2 Diabetes told not long ago. But things do and will get better if you want them to, I know they will if you let them, and just help yourself to some extent. As for me I just get some information in my head and march towards the better options out there. we cannot change what we have, and we, (your not alone) have to deal with it. I see the road as twisting with a few stops along the way, not the greatest thing in the world to have Diabetes but most certainly not the worst. Chin up and go for it.
     
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  11. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    For anyone going through tough times regarding their diabetes management and from reading on the forum how some younger type 1 members really, really struggle, this is a must read for all.Remember you are not alone.

    Connecting people with diabetes

    Putting the Brakes on Diabetes Burnout


    Helen Edwards; Founder and Director Diabetes Counselling Onlinewww.diabetescounselling.com.au
    Diabetes burn out is a common problem for many people, but what is it? Basically this occurs when you grow very tired of managing your diabetes. You might experience feelings of exhaustion and instead of sticking to your regular blood glucose checks, medications, exercise, insulin and other self care tasks, you only do them partially or possibly neglect them altogether for a period of time. It is more than just having a bad day. You just can’t seem to muster the motivation to keep on managing and the guilt and stress about what this is doing to your body just builds up…..adding to your distress.

    The challenge for people living with diabetes and this includes family members and caregivers, is to walk the fine line between stress and worry about diabetes, with feeling comfortable about where diabetes sits in your life. You need to try and have perspective about what your goals are and what you can realistically manage at this moment. When you balance this you are able to better manage under times of stress and prevent burn out. One of the biggest things that can help is to have good support. This includes from family, friends, other people with diabetes and your health care team. Exercise and relaxation strategies really help. Learning mindfulness, which teaches you to worry less and be present in your daily life helps to reduce anxiety and distress. Being able to feel in control and have a tool kit for what to do when things feel like they may be getting out of control in any aspect of your life really makes a difference. Diabetes is not just about your blood glucose and stress and problems in other areas of life will have an impact on you control. So it is important to make sure you stay healthy in all areas of your life and keep on top of stress.

    Diabetes is different to other chronic disease as it requires self management by you on a daily even hourly basis, with guidance from your health care team. It can be easy to become overwhelmed by all the tasks you need to do and the day to day effort needed to manage. Burn out is particularly likely if you work really hard at managing your diabetes but the results are not what you would like. It is also more likely when you have pressure or stress in other areas of your life that you feel you can not control. Diabetes burn out can last a short time, be ongoing, or can come and go. Studies have shown that a majority of people living with diabetes do experience worries, fears and negative feelings at some stage. Some high risk times where you may experience burn out due to added stress or changes in your life include:

    1. If you are not meeting diabetes targets, frustration with lack of movement towards your health goals
    2. Experiencing family/relationship problems, breakdown or violence
    3. Transition or times of change in your life
    4. Loss of someone you care about or other grief/loss
    5. Experiencing poverty or homelessness
    6. Drug and alcohol problems
    7. Problems with work and financial stress
    8. Other physical or mental health problems – such as another chronic disease, depression, mental illness, eating disorders
    9. Pregnancy – planning pregnancy and trying to conceive, during pregnancy and parenting when you have diabetes yourself
    10. Growing older and dealing with changes to your body, your health and your diabetes
    11. Diagnosis of diabetes complications
    The recent 2011 study Diabetes MILES which surveyed over 3000 adults with diabetes in Australia found that overall, people were least satisfied with their health, as compared to other aspects of their life. Adults with type 2 diabetes who were using insulin had lower levels of satisfaction across all life areas (e.g. health, relationships, safety, standard of living) as compared to adults with type 1 diabetes or with those who had type 2 diabetes but were not using insulin. Adults with type 2 diabetes who were using insulin were also more likely to experience moderate to severe symptoms of depression and anxiety than other respondents. Moderate to severe depressive symptoms affected 35% of adults with type 2 on insulin, as compared to 22% of those with type 1 and 23% of those with type 2 who were not using insulin. Moderate to severe anxiety symptoms also affected 19% of adults with type 2 who were using insulin, as compared to 15% of those with type 1 and 14% of those with type 2 non-insulin-managed diabetes. Adults with type 1 diabetes were more likely to experience severe diabetes-related distress than other respondents. 28% of adults with type 1 diabetes experienced severe distress, as compared to 22% of people with type 2 insulin-managed and 17% of type 2 non insulin-managed diabetes. The most commonly reported problem area for respondents (consistent across diabetes types and treatment regimens) was worrying about the future and the development of diabetes related complications.

    Rates of diabetes related distress are high yet people are often scared to ask for help, particularly if they have not been managing well. It is important that you DO ask for help and remember there is no such thing as a silly question! Most of us get tired of doing everyday tasks and diabetes sure adds to those! Few people can maintain all the tasks of diabetes care week-in, week-out AND keep blood glucose and HbA1c’s in the narrow target range all the time. Without realistic expectations and practical strategies for managing the thoughts, feelings and emotional side of diabetes, the risk of burnout is higher. The way we think and talk about diabetes has a major impact on how we feel and manage diabetes. Using words like “ high and low” blood glucose instead of “good and bad” can help and so does using CHECK instead of the word TEST when talking about blood glucose monitoring. The reality is most people have an immediate reaction to a high or low BGL. That is normal and fine, but once you have this reaction move on to looking at the number and working out how to manage this and prevent it in the future if possible.

    Seven Steps to dealing with Burn out

    1. Consider what particular areas of diabetes are causing you problems – usually it is not all of it! Then develop steps for sorting these areas. Get help if needed.
    2. What else is happening in your life that might be conflicting with diabetes care, or making it harder?
    3. How might you address these things?
    4. What are your expectations for your diabetes management? Do you need to lower or increase your expectations?
    5. What sorts of thoughts and feelings are you having about diabetes/
    6. How are you managing these and are these strategies working? What have you tried?
    7. Do you have any support? Is it the right support? Is it enough support? If not, how can you get this?
    Support is vital. Make sure you get this from a variety of sources:

    • Health Care Team
    • Family and friends
    • People with diabetes
    • Online and in person
    • Books, magazines and other sources of information
    • Counselling and other specialists
    • Take time out from diabetes and other stress – try to be a “human being” not always a “human doing”!
    Diabetes might thrive on maths – to be corrected and added up BUT You are not a maths problem! See yourself as a sunset – not something to be solved, but appreciated –your achievements, attempts at change, dreams and goals – sit back and appreciate them from time to time and remember there is more to life than diabetes.
     
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    #11 Robinredbreast, Mar 21, 2015 at 3:22 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 14, 2015
  12. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This is brilliant. Diabetes can be such a devastating illness. Not just for the person with it but also the sufferers loved ones and kin. It can destroy relationships !

    I had an Aunt who had Type 1 diabetes for a nunmber of years and she was a truly laid back lovely human being. She suffered severe burnout about ten years ago. She just lost the motivation to live and ended up having a breakdown and was sectioned under the mental health act.
    I have no idea where she is now, the entire family moved on and informed no one. All very sad.

    It wasn't until 10 or so years ago that I realised this existed, I saw a leaflet at my diabetes clinic and it summarised everything written in the above post.

    I suffer with GAD (Generalised Anxiety Disorder) and this can add to my diabetes worries. Any other long term (or indeed short term) illness can add or be a trigger for burnout.
    It's quite a vicious cycle when your actually in it as you lose heart and perspective. You begin to mistreat your diabetes and then as complications start taking effect or getting worse the motivation to get on top of things just dissipates and bad control escalates and so on and so on.

    It is paramount to seek advice and help from expertise outside the diabetes arena. I attended CBT for my chronic GAD and have tools today that I use when I start losing the motivation to accomplish things through fear and I also have support for other areas that I can sometime struggle with such as being in recovery from alcohol dependence. I now have this Forum for the diabetes.

    Everything is down to good diabetes control and the motivation to get on top of things when things start to get on top of you.

    The key to motivation for me is to look at how far I have come rather than how far I have to go and this I believe to be a good mantra regarding this illness.

    Positivity and the willingness to accept support when struggling is a must. I can not afford to get sucked into a depressive cycle that could eventually lead to mental breakdown, loss of limbs, kidney and heart failure or blindness. Actually, just reminding myself of those things I find quite motivating.

    Important to keep it in the day and not to look too far ahead. Keep it in the "now"

    I am writing this and it is "now"
    This time next week and in a months time it will be "now"
    This time in 10 years time it will be "now"
    And when I am lying on my death bed it will still be "now"

    As it will always be "now" "now" is the only thing I need learn to respond to !

    KevFitz
     
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    #12 kevinfitzgerald, Mar 21, 2015 at 4:46 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 21, 2015
  13. Zoexena41

    Zoexena41 Type 2 · Newbie

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    This was great to read. I was diagnosed over a year ago and have been in denial and didn't and still don't take my diabetes very seriously. I struggle to find foods I like to eat, my job is hectic and I struggle to eat on a regular basis. Over the past few months I have noticed that if I don't eat I get very shaky and nearly faint and have to grab anything to eat. I get tired really easily, although suffer from insomnia, feel at times that this is a sentence. I have done many hours research over past week and have got it clear in my mind to start looking after myself and my diabetes and will try and take one day at a time
     
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  14. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    So pleased it has helped and as you say, just one day at a time. :)
     
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  15. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    A massive welcome Zoexena.

    Yes one day at a time.

    Do good today and we can forget yesterday and look forward to tomorrow ! :)
     
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  16. Claire-Marie

    Claire-Marie Type 1 · Member

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    I am 48 years young and have been T1 for 35 years and always managed it very well. However I recently had a massive heart attack, followed by stents and a triple by pass op. Since the heart attack my Diabetes has become so difficult to manage. I am on so much medication for the heart and have also recently had an ICD implanted and Central Sleep Apnoea diagnosed. My heart now being in heart failure and I need a heart transplant. I just find it really difficult to find the enthusiasm to bother with any of it anymore. I had such good control before the heart attack, but I feel what difference did it make. Consultants have said there is nothing I could have done differently. I'm just finding coping with all of it too much. I'm def having a burn out ! x
     
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    #16 Claire-Marie, Apr 3, 2015 at 5:14 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 3, 2015
  17. Moniker

    Moniker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That sounds so tough. It's not surprising that you are fed up. I hope things get easier for you.
     
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  18. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hello Claire -marie, so sorry to hear of your heart problems, this must be devastating for you. Having type 1 for 35 years is quite a feat it's self and managing very well too.
    I can try to understand how you must be feeling, if you need to have a chat or a moan this is place to be as members are so supportive and helpful. Do you have a partner, hubby or children for support ?
    If you would like to pm me any time, for anything, then please do.

    Take care and wishing you all the best for a positive and a more healthier future.

    RRB x
     
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  19. Living-by-the-beach

    Living-by-the-beach Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Claire-Marie

    I will pray for you. Its not easy I know this all too well. Yet I will pray for you..

    JM
     
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  20. WeeWillie

    WeeWillie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good impressive post Robinredbreast, thank you, it offers much to reflect on and has given me plenty of food for thought.

    The other member's replies are also rather impressive. Excellent post all round.

    Regards.

    willie.
     
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