1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Diabetes is serious take control now

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by fatbird, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. fatbird

    fatbird · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    239
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Without careful, continued management of the condition, a person with diabetes faces a reduced life expectancy of between 6 to 20 years15. Each year, the condition is associated with 75,000 deaths; this is 24,000 more deaths than would be expected in this group16. People with diabetes also run a greater risk of developing one or more severe health complications, which can greatly impact on their independence, quality of life and economic contribution.

    In the UK diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in working age people17,18, and a main contributor to kidney failure, amputations and cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke19. One in five children who have Type 1 diabetes will be at increased risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)20, a critical, life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention.

    Many of these complications are avoidable with good risk assessment and early diagnosis, patient education, support and good ongoing services. Estimates show that of more than 100 amputations carried out each week from diabetes complications21, up to 80 per cent are preventable22.

    Cancer, stroke and heart disease have been targeted by national programmes to raise awareness and drive improvement. Diabetes has not.

    Between 2006 and 2010, there has been an increase in unnecessary complications23.

    Retinopathy increased by 118 per cent
    Stroke increased by 87 per cent
    Kidney failure increased by 56 per cent
    Cardiac failure increased by 43 per cent
    Angina increased by 33 per cent
    Amputations increased by 26 per cent

    If NDA figures are reflected across the country among people with diabetes, then the number of people with these complications has increased at the above rates. Many of these complications need not happen.

    http://www.diabetes.org.uk/Documents/Re ... n-2012.pdf

    FB
     
  2. paul-1976

    paul-1976 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,695
    Likes Received:
    1,933
    Trophy Points:
    178
    EXACTLY!! This is not a condition that can be ignored or put off 'til next year-even if asymptomatic-high BG's are doing invisible damage behind the scenes and the first thing you know is when serious life changing complications have developed-this condition takes NO prisoners.

    Paul
     
  3. Carbdodger

    Carbdodger · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Can only agree! So why is it that so many on here want to take a break from looking after themselves because it is Xmas, a birthday, a bad day, name another reason. I'm not sure folks really get the fact that diabetes does kill. If you put off looking after it until tomorrow maybe you'll not see that tomorrow.
    There are enough low carb alternatives so that the high carb killers can take a back seat.
    I'm posting as a type 2.
    Cd
     
  4. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,423
    Likes Received:
    1,657
    Trophy Points:
    178
    So, its about time the NHS started doing some serious work about it rather than the pathetic way they treat it now. Not everybody can/will/want to know how they can decrease the problems. A lot of people simply trust that their GP practise are doing the right thing.
    e.g. here take these pills, eat a healthy diet and exercise. Without actually specifying what a healthy diet is.
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    2,283
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I have trouble remembering what I had for lunch yesterday, but I still remember what the doctor who oversaw my admittance to hospital said when I was diagnosed over 30 years ago; you have a choice - either you control diabetes or it will control you.

    Those increases are pretty amazing; what has happened since 2006 to cause that?

    Best

    Dillinger
     
  6. fatbird

    fatbird · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    239
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Diabetes never sleeps-it never has a day off. It is our enemy-but we can beat our enemy-with constant vigilance. A diabetic can live with the condition for 50-60-70 and more years-this has been proved. The key is running blood glucose numbers as close to non diabetic as possible. This has also been proved.

    For every percentage point drop in A1C blood test results (from 8.0 percent to 7.0 percent, for example), the risk of diabetic eye, nerve, and kidney disease is reduced by 40 percent. Lowering blood sugar reduces these microvascular complications in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Intensive blood sugar control in people with type 1 diabetes (average A1C of 7.4%) reduces the risk of any CVD event by 42 percent and the risk of heart attack, stroke, or death from CVD by 57 percent.

    Source: DCCT/EDIC, reported in December 22, 2005, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

    FB
     
  7. TuTusweet

    TuTusweet · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    28
    <<<So why is it that so many on here want to take a break from looking after themselves because it is Xmas, a birthday, a bad day, name another reason.>>>

    How about because if you spend every single day obsessing about spikes, pricking your finger ten times a day, swallowing the lucrative products of the pharmaceutical companies, worrying about blindness ,stroke ,amputations etc etc etc etc without having just one day off to indulge then life is probably not worth living.

    It may come as a shock but one day you will die. If it is not the worlds second most profitable medical industry diabetes (I read on some USA website ) that gets you it will be cancer, heart attack, a bus, a muslim fanatic, a herd of cows, a trigger happy copper, a pub sign falling on your head, or stress from failing to keep a sense of proportion and perspective in dealing with the problem.

    Life kills you eventually. I am taking the business seriously but at my age I am Bu**ered if I intend to become a raving hypochondriac. Sorry.
     
  8. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    Likes Received:
    2,283
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I'm old now - and there's the proof; I've just had my own post quoted back at me by a new member!!!

    viewtopic.php?f=19&t=8317

    I don't mind fatbird; I'm flattered but in the way someone would be flattered to be called 'very old and wise'... :shock:

    But all that jollity aside I was thinking about this as I came home tonight; unlike say arthritis or HIV or most other chronic disease diabetes is pretty unique in being so closely tied up with what we eat. I'm always shocked and amazed at how little proper information any of us gets from our HCPs. 'Balanced diet' rubbish aside; that phrase sounds sensible but tells you nothing you need to know about eating as a diabetic, the best people get is the preposterous 'healthy eating plate'.

    The answer is simple though and many of us know it; carbs. They are not our friends; they are the problem and they are the things we need to steer well clear of.

    Best

    Dillinger
     
  9. Beachbag

    Beachbag Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    1,256
    Trophy Points:
    158
    I'm also posting as a Type2,insulin dependent.
    IMHO.... Yes, we need to take good care of ourselves, keep our BGs within range etc, but surely to goodness ONE day, or two if you count a birthday as well, isn't going to hasten ones death!
    In my book Obsession is the name of a perfume, not a way to live or control Diabetes. Sorry if I've offended anyone. It's not intended.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  10. TuTusweet

    TuTusweet · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Exactly what I said at 9.23 above. Hear Hear.
     
  11. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,215
    Likes Received:
    12,468
    Trophy Points:
    298
    No matter what you do, you have to be happy....

    Treats over Xmas, birthdays, special occasions and being to give diabetes a relaxed day, is so much better than living with it and being obsessed on Christmas Day that it ruins your day....

    It is a long term shortener of our life expectancy for sure. But tbh, I don't want to live a long life. I love living now, yes... But in a OAP home, having dementia, and no family or after stroke etc.... No thanks....

    I never thought I would get to 50..if I get to 55 with my legs on and no further complications or illnesses I will be happy, but...any I do not want to live a long life to be honest, it doesn't bother me....

    I live my life in moderation, but with good friends and a good mum and stepdad with huge amounts of laughter and fun nowadays. I do excess on occasions, but do I let it worry me or bother me? -no.

    Do I worry about whether any of my past has given me my future? -NO.... I CANNOT GO BACK AND UNDO THE PAST.....I accept I have not been perfect, never will be.... But I am now very happy and content. Not perfect health, but I am NOT GOING TO LET IMPERFECT PHYSICAL HEALTH UNBALANCE MY ENTAL HEALTH AND WORRY ME IN TO AN EARLY GRAVE.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  12. Mongoose39uk

    Mongoose39uk Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    223
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I agree. I have a life and I will live it diabetes is just a part of it.
     
  13. mrman

    mrman Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,420
    Likes Received:
    2,674
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Yes, it is serious, fully agree. Can I take a day off, I wish. I will enjoy the festivities but just means that I have to inject more insulin, go for after meal walks nice to do mind, always enjoy that when I.got the timee to do it. Will my levels be good, well, they Were last year. i simply live life as non diabetic except testing and injecting lol. Much the same as the general population will be hitting the gym harder come january

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  14. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,215
    Likes Received:
    12,468
    Trophy Points:
    298
    To me.... F you can't give yourself a day off occasionally the that is totally sad..

    Diabetes as an illnesses is growing hugely amongst the worlds population and type 2 is the greatest if worked out in terms of percentages, a greater percentage increase for type 2's than type1's.

    However ...the increase in the amputations, kidney disease etc has to be seen in percentage term increases... Not as a count of persons ....

    Until the increase in the diagnosis of diabetes is established... Anybody's dream of eliminating diabetes and the follow on complications and shortening of life stands little chance of improvement...




    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  15. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,215
    Likes Received:
    12,468
    Trophy Points:
    298
    The term day off to me isn't actually that.... As that is impossible....

    However.....perhaps I should rephrase if as a time of coping with "relaxing the rules"....
    For example... Over Christmas and special occasions, I literally put my pump on working overtime.... I do allow myself literally what I want....

    Yes, I a type 1, I am lucky to give double doses at least of insulin to do so... But I certainly don't worry about how many carbs, drinks or anything that I eat on Christmas Day.... It's not a day off from diabetes.... But heck, yes, it is certainly a day off from the moderation that is in my life for the vast majority of time in the last 30 years.

    Do I fret that a day or two enjoyment of food is going to decrease my life expectancy by a little bit...no...



    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  16. mrman

    mrman Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,420
    Likes Received:
    2,674
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  17. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,342
    Likes Received:
    8,380
    Trophy Points:
    178
    personally, if i ever have a meal off, i dont enjoy it anyway, i am happier being good, so by being good xmas day im making me happy :thumbup: i could pretend to enjoy not eating the way i do but id be pretending anyway so.... maybe one day ill feel different but for now ill stick ith the plan :) im not saying anyone should though, i dont think a day off would hurt anyone
     
  18. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,585
    Likes Received:
    3,769
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I'm in control.
    Very well in control.
    But it's not the sole focus of my life. I control diabetes, it doesn't control me, and by that I mean I haven't swopped tablets for a dread of food.
    I have good bs, I have a good Hba1c, but I eat a healthy balanced diet. I'm not obsessive about carbs, I'm happy about what I eat, I don't know what "carb cravings are", I just eat a reasonable amount. I can eat some carbs, if there is no other food, I will eat carbs. I'll work it off, but I won't refuse to eat. I used to eat far too much, and that was down to me. I now eat a lot less.
    Now if I work hard, or play hard, I'll eat more, but I'm far more in control over what I eat, and how much.
    I also compare my bs against other non diabetic people in my family, and surprisingly, they rise after eating as well.
     
  19. Carbdodger

    Carbdodger · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    *sighs*
    Would you suggest to an ex-smoker they have aday off from not smoking? Or that a recovering drug addict has a break from being clean for a day?
    Cd
     
  20. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,342
    Likes Received:
    8,380
    Trophy Points:
    178

    thats a good point :thumbup: and thats how i feel i am too
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook