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Diabetics and pension

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Griffithsr13, Jul 19, 2017.

  1. Griffithsr13

    Griffithsr13 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Can anyone explain to me why diabetic sufferers can not retire earlier. With the age of the state pension raising again. I have looked on a web site that says that diabetic men live on average to the age of 66. Which is lower than the age of retirement. However we still have to pay in to a fund we may never be able to take out our pension.
    Maybe I'm just being stupid but it was just a thought.

    So should people with diabetes be able to retire earlier in order to enjoy retirement and claim some of the money we have payied in.

    Anybody got any thoughts???
     
  2. ally1

    ally1 Type 2 · Expert

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    Am t2.
    I know a man who is t1 and is 69 and in good health.
    My next door neighbour is 81 and t1 and he is in great shape.
    I understand where you are coming from, but anybody female or male can get any kind of illness or have a long term condition and can die way before they are of retirement age. They would have been paying towards their pensions
     
  3. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    Well if diabetes is very well managed we may also live longer , I think anyway that society and health care is not doing the best job in learning people to take a true control over their condition . If done early in diabetes devellopment there actually usually are ways to take total control in type 2 and maybe in a lesser degree type 1 , But of cause it comes with a lot of effort and willingness to take control and do as much as one is able to of different acts to be in control. Like meassuring ones blood glucose Daily and continuingly , by changing food style radically , by moving ones body daily in an adequate amount in ways that suits the person and actually understanding that till now there is only the cure of taking control and changing lifestyle as Much as nessesary . Of cause many also have other issues conserning health and it can be more than one can bear , thats the sadder side of This condition that it is a condition that takes a lot of effort continuingly and daily like forever and the rest of ones life . It is only a belief I have But I think there will be found a cure in not a very distant future maybe mainly because the cost for society will be so devastating with This rapid raise in the numbers of people becomming diabetic in a younger and younger age and also realising that pollution is also contributing to the raise of diabetes
     
    #3 Freema, Jul 19, 2017 at 10:05 PM
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2017
  4. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    By the way I can recomend building more musclemass , I Think that has helped me to be able to cope with quite a lot more carbs Daily in my meals without raising my numbers much if at all
     
  5. Griffithsr13

    Griffithsr13 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Thanks for the reply's

    I need to start controlling my diabetes better. I do really well for a while then just seem to fall off the wagon again.

    I find it so difficult to keep on track and I've been type 1 for 25 years.
    Dread to think of the damage I've done already but no matter what I try I just don't seem to have the willpower to keep on top of it.
    It's lead me in to depression and when I have bad days I just seem to lose the will and end up eating chocolate, cakes , biscuits etc.
    Has anyone else found this and do you have any tips for me???
     
  6. chris lowe

    chris lowe · Guest

    A ex colleague & good friend just recovered from bowel cancer, now got 3 months after brain tumour was discovered . Not even got to pensionable age yet, so he's not getting any pension. Thing is we don't know what the future holds. My brother worked in a strenuous manual job until he was 65 and only retired because he had to. Everyone is an individual & I tend to take statistics, especially when it comes to health, with a hefty dose of scepticism
     
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  7. Cumberland

    Cumberland Type 1 · Master

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    Raising the state pension age is disgusting

    I won't get it until I'm 67 if I live that long

    I have Diabetes, and other long term conditions

    I think those folk who want to work on into their 70s should be able to do so after having obtained a fit note from their GP and those who want to stop work a few years earlier on health issues should be allowed to do so after getting signed off by their GP

    My health fluctuates good days and bad, born with pancreas divisum I've not been blessed with good health my entire life

    Austerity I don't believe we are all in this together it's a load of bollox
     
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  8. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Raising the pension/retirement age is fairly straight forward: people are living longer and there isn't enough money to continue supporting the program long-term unless something gives.

    The concept worked when the life expectancy was 10+ years lower, the economy was growing at a more aggressive rate, and healthcare was much more simplistic (read as *cheaper*).

    Higher and longer costs that aren't being offset by investment growth equate to an underfunded pension system.

    I live in the US where our system is different but fundamentally the same. My wife and I are 30 and 29 years old. Combined, we will pay a little over $18,000 in social security (our country's pension) tax. The system is expected to run out of money somewhere around 2033 (when we are 46 and 45 years old), yet full retirement age is set at 67.

    Effectively: we pay $18k/year into a system that is set to run out of money 20+ years before we retire. It's hard to argue that that's not messed up.
     
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