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Did any of your parents have T2 & how did/do they fare ?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Ronancastled, Oct 22, 2021.

  1. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was adopted so I've no idea if I've a whole family with T2 or I am an outlier.
    I'd be interested to know how many of our cohort have T2 parents & how that generation dealt with it in "darker times". ?
     
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  2. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My mother had it, she changed her diet and is now in remission. Her diet is pretty high carb compared to me, which is very interesting.
     
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  3. lorib64

    lorib64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My mom has T2, also. She still eats sweets and takes medicine (I don't know what). She says her Dr is happy if A1C is under 7%. I will come back with conversion. She asks what my husband and I do. He eats low carb but not keto and has reversed it, I do keto and got off Januvia but still take metformin. We tell her but she doesn't want to do anything that is restrictive. She is 85 and looks healthy but she has T2, high BP and recently had a heart attack. Thankfully she recovered well.
     
  4. lorib64

    lorib64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can't see how to edit but 7% converts to 53 mmol/mol
     
  5. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    My father and his father before him

    My father progressed onto insulin, he had glaucoma, all sorts of laser treatments but went blind eventually. He had many ulcers and Charcot in both feet leading to significant misshaping and damage. Didn’t have amputation but had many periods of time in hospital due to the complications

    diet of multiple severe stroke, probably due to to diabetes

    but… never really changed his diet. Still hate huge amounts of carbs and chocolates etc. snacked in the evening, cheese and crackers were his go to

    I’m not sure what dietary advice he was given but yeah… didn’t follow and too stubborn to admit that he needed to change, and probably not helped by the Eatwell mantra
     
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  6. McHelen

    McHelen Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My mum is T2, takes metformin and ignores all the advice. She is 82, a celiac and survived breast cancer. Her feet have very little feeling now, so we have to be vigilant with foot care.
     
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  7. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    My gran had it, and I haven't been on speaking terms with dad for well over 12 years, so... I do remember that his new wife put him on a rice-crackers-only diet because he was developing a gut back then. (And we all know how great a pancreas does when swimming in abdominal fats. Rice was fuel to the fire, most likely.). So, I'm guessing he's headed down the same path as gran and I.

    I do remember how gran dealt with it: she let her one little pill a day do all the work. She did have a meter, and so did the lady across the street, who was diagnosed around the same time. They'd sit and have coffee together, with very sweet whipped cream on and with pastries, every single day, and take measurements. It was some sort of competition between them, but they didn't seem to know what the numbers actually meant. It was just a game they played while stuffing themselves. (They didn't eat, they stuffed. Eat till you feel sick, you know?). It ended with complications and death, and that was before the times of Dr. Google, so there was no other information available than what she was told by the medical pro's... And it's not likely she listened to them if they said anything she didn't like anyway. She never took it seriously, and I don't think she ever linked her rapidly failing heart to her out-of-control blood sugars.
     
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  8. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Neither parents have type 2.
     
    #8 ert, Oct 23, 2021 at 7:46 AM
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2021
  9. Widgets

    Widgets Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    My granddad had type-2. He was diagnosed in the late 1960s/early 1970s. When I was very young I remember him having a crate of fizzy drinks delivered by the "pop man" every week. There used to be a delivery service for fizzy drinks along the same lines as milk doorstep deliveries.

    I remember that he had to eat regularly and always with a slice or two of bread and margarine, no matter how much he'd eaten earlier. I assume that was what he had been told by the medics. He had very little feeling in his fingers and had both legs amputated before he died in 1984 or so.

    I dread to think what his numbers were and how much damage happened because he followed advice for those 15 or so years.
     
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    #9 Widgets, Oct 23, 2021 at 8:15 AM
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2021
  10. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't know of anyone in my family with diabetes. However, I got diagnosed at a routine test aged 67, so if relatives were the same it's possible they had it and never knew.
    Diets are handed down as well as genes. It's common to see husband and wife both obese, they share diet but don't share genes. Maybe handing down diet is, at least in part, why diabetes runs in families.
     
  11. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    The female side of my mother's family were obese. I think now that they were insulin resistant but didn't live long enough to be diagnosed T2.
     
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  12. OB87

    OB87 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No one in my family has type 2. I'm not sure why I diagnosed so young. My diet wasn't great but not any different to other people my age. My weight loss has greatly improved my blood sugars
     
  13. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    Neither of my parents had diabetes but my mother's sister is T2 as I do not have any knowledge of my who my paternal grandfather was I could have many relatives with diabetes who are unknown to me.

    My OH Judih's brother is T1 and two of her cousins are T1 also. My grandson's other granddad is T2 as was his other grandmother his paternal great grandfather was T1 his paternal great Grandmother was T2 grandson nor his father or uncle have diabetes.
     
  14. Erin

    Erin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, a few members of my family had a propensity for diabetes. I would not jump to conclusions about genetic causes for all, though.
     
  15. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    My mother had T2, and refused to stop eating sugary stuff let alone go low carb. She ended up with some sight loss and neuropathy bad enough that it that limited her mobility.
    She is the reason I struggle to get my emotional eating under control so I can stay low carb.
     
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  16. mo53

    mo53 Type 2 · Expert

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    My mother had type 2 and glaucoma. She developed a very large leg ulcer on her shin which would not heal. She did not control her diet and developed dementia. She had a meter but only used it when she was pressed by a family member. When I fall off the wagon of low carb it is memories of my Mum that make me climb back on!
     
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    #16 mo53, Oct 23, 2021 at 12:54 PM
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2021
  17. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Yep, my dad one day came back from our family GP around 25/30 years back & mentioned something along the lines of, "I got a touch of diabetes.."
    Like me, a slim active guy. (Even during his retirement, he carried on working.)
    I honestly don't think his managment was that great. (Metformin.)

    it all came to a head after a "mini stroke" (even after recovering from that, he returned back to work?) & then diagnosed with vascular demetia.. During this time, my mum became his full time carer with myself being closest offering support looking in & helping out with the "dad sitting." Around my work commitments.
    Oddly, his surgery had prescribed a meter & strips? At the time it was fancier than my meter.
    We revised his diet by (guess what.) cutting carbs. & he came off metformin.
    The progressive nature of vascular demetia took him around 8 years later, in the end.
     
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  18. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is a great question: my dad was diagnosed with T2in the mid 1990's, and it was part of my life from that point onwards: the obsession with numbers, the testing. When I was diagnosed with "pre-diabetes", I joined his nightmare: it's legitimately the closest bond we have.
     
  19. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    My father, my brother, my paternal auntie, several of my paternal cousins.
     
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  20. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    My mother had T2. She loved sweet sugary stuff. I don't know what meds she was given initially, but she ended up on insulin injections. She died after third stroke at 71.
     
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