1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Disposal of used test strips

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by SophiaW, Oct 24, 2009.

  1. SophiaW

    SophiaW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,015
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Hi everyone. I'm curious to know how everyone disposes of their used test strips. I've always put them in the bin, not into the sharps bin. At school they have also been putting the used strips into the bin. However my son said that a few weeks ago he noticed a couple of used test strips lying on the ground outside the classroom at school near my daughter's (who is the diabetic) classroom. I can only think that perhaps the cleaner spilled the contents of the bin or something. However it worried me because these are medical waste aren't they, as they contain a small amount of blood? Should I be supplying the school with a sharps bin to put the test strips into?
     
  2. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,672
    Likes Received:
    3,675
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Personally I dispose of my strips in a sharps bin. When out I put them in an old strips tube kept in the case with my meter and dispose of them when I get home. Perhaps your daughter could do this. (label the one for used stips so that she doesn't get them muddled up)
     
  3. cugila

    cugila · Master

    Messages:
    10,272
    Likes Received:
    98
    Trophy Points:
    118
    I think Phoenix has the right idea here.

    I too always use a sharps bin. Anything with human blood on should always be disposed of carefully. I have an empty container too. Saves putting the onus on others for what is after all, my own personal clinical waste.
     
  4. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

    Messages:
    8,157
    Likes Received:
    340
    Trophy Points:
    103
    As far as I'm aware, anything with blood in is supposed to go into bleach. [to eliminate blood borne diseases.]
    Actually, I put mine into a tied poly bag and then the bin
     
  5. mca2

    mca2 Type 1 · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    The packets of test strips say they can be disposed of in the bin. I am a teacher at a primary school, so with similar concerns I use a sharps bin at school, which they dispose of when it gets full. At home I generally use the bin. However, I do use an optium meter, which has individually wrapped strips so make sure that the bloody end goes back into the wrapper before I do so.

    Mark
     
  6. acron^

    acron^ · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I do the same as Mark. When testing at work, I whack them back into the wrapper, ensuring the 'blood' end goes into the bottom. But then, I just throw them in the bin. I'm fairly confident they're not going to be fished out or dropped anywhere so I don't see the problem.
     
  7. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,222
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I chuck them in the bin!

    The actual design of a test strip means that it's impossible to recieve a 'finger prick' injury from a test strip unlike an needle or syringe... So you are left with a very very slim possibity of corss-contamination which in reality you would be more likely to win the lottery several times before contracting anything via cross-contamination form a test strip...

    If we turn our minds to what is thrown out in general household rubbish, dirty and bloodied tissues, along side dirty nappies used sanitory items the humble test strip is the least dangerous item!
     
  8. janabelle

    janabelle · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    816
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Spot on Jopar! Common sense prevails.
    Excellent post.
    Jus
     
  9. Shazza

    Shazza · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    i do the same as jopar havent been told to do otherwise and omg it must be horrendous what goes in bins
     
  10. SophiaW

    SophiaW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,015
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Thanks for the replies everyone. I think certainly for school I'll have the used test strips put into an old container and returned home for disposal.
     
  11. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    771
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Chuck 'em in the bin! Just like I would do with a used plaster?
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook