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Does anyone worry that some meds may hasten the requirement for insulin ?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Ronancastled, Sep 23, 2021.

  1. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for this doozy but I'm waiting on the Ryder Cup opening ceremony & I am on my second glass of a fine Malbec.

    I've avoided meds luckily so far but often consider the future & the long game.
    Met seems all good, my Endo even said he'd put it in the water supply if he could.
    I probably should be taking it but like the idea it's in reserve as the super sub if needed.

    I'm aware of the Flozins where you kidneys urinate out the glucose stopping it from re-entering the bloodstream.
    Then there's the Semaglutides like Ozempic that force your beta cells to produce more insulin.
    While I like the idea of these drugs my fear is that they will eventually result in secondary drug failure & speed up the progression to insulin.

    Not sure I have a question, just would like to know if my fears are unfounded ?
     
  2. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If I need meds, well, then I’ll take them. But I really want to avoid them as long as I have control. I do worry about the side effects of medications. Im hopeful that the drastic measures im doing now will help me remain in control into my later years.
     
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  3. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    I read somewhere that our bodies get used to the meds, so we need more and more of them..............of course, I cant find links now.
     
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  4. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I know this to be a fact, I have a wound similar to a ulcer on my leg that will not heal up properly over years, I have had a ship load of antibiotics prescribed with any success in this time. It turns out that I am now oral antibiotic intolerant (specialists words) and have to get hooked up to a infusion thingy to get liquid antibiotics into me.

    The infusion clears up the pseudomonas aeroginosa infection I get in the wound.

    Getting back on topic, I did take Metformin E/R for a couple of years till I got my bgl low enough to get off of them. I have noticed I have an upwards creep with my hba1c since, but I have had some weird stuff to drink for various scans at the hospital just lately.
     
  5. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If I need medication I will take it, but if I can achieve my goals without then I prefer to avoid any potential side effects by doing it with a 'way of eating' instead.
    Not everybody will agree, but I think that this is the only sensible action.
    As a doctor said, if a medication has no side effects, then it probably has no effects at all!
     
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  6. Drfarxan

    Drfarxan · Well-Known Member

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    For what i have read metformin seems to be a safe drug even though i am on remission i still take it. But the only med that seems to hasten the need for insulin is insulin!! its like people using steroids to get buff then end up not being able to make their own testosterone
     
  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    From what I understand from the body building "comunity."

    Anabolic steroid use over time can mess up metabolism & organs as a result . They turn to & obtain off script exogenous insulin in order to maitain the "buff" image for competitive reasons.. (Or the continuation of.) Of course this is a dangerous practice.
    I've certaily been gobsmacked at some of the "advice" on the subject matter out there..

    legitimately. Insulin dosage on the whole tends to just meet the requirements of the diabetic. It is what it is & varies from patient to patient?

    To my mind. Insulin after trying other meds is not a failure. It just means the patient may well have been prescribed the wrong meds in the first place? ;)
     
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  8. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Not all hormones are like that, Exogenous melatonin won’t nuke natural production. I think insulin is similar but I’m not entirely sure.
     
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  9. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Ronancastled please take care not to demonise insulin.
    It is a life saver for many of us on this forum - mostly, but not all, with Type 1.
    I appreciate you posted this in the type 2 sub forum but the thread appears in the recent posts lists which, for many, is all that is read.
    As @Jaylee mentioned, "Insulin .. is not a failure"
     
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  10. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    Impossible to answer without prior knowledge of existing endogenous insulin production. If you already produce too much then stimulating more with medication or adding exogenous will only ever drive the pathology in one direction.
     
  11. jaywak

    jaywak Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I just think of insulin as a direct replacement for something that is missing ! If you loose a limb you can get a prosthetic limb , If your kidneys fail you can get replacements even a heart replacement , so I have no insulin so I replace it with the nearest we can get to an exact replacement and it seems to work very well .
     
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    #11 jaywak, Sep 24, 2021 at 9:43 AM
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2021
  12. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Do note though that this was posted in the Type 2 section and the vast majority of T2's I believe do not underproduce insulin, in fact I think many probably overproduce (I could be wrong but I think I'm roughly right)


    Edit (after a bit): But yes insulin is most definitely a life saver for those of us do not not produce our own or those who do underproduce
     
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    #12 Rokaab, Sep 24, 2021 at 10:01 AM
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2021
  13. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

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    You are certainly right in my case.
     
  14. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    From a recent Government report:

    "And around 6.5% of hospital admissions are caused by adverse effects of medicines. This rises to up to 20% in the over-65 age group."

    I wonder how many don't get to hospital and just put up with it.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-58639253
     
  15. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    Insulin for my type 2 diabetic brother is proving to be a life saver.

    He has been on it for several months, after 10 years of gradually increasing other meds. He has also been dealing with depression for a very long time.

    He feels so much better on insulin that he is now able to begin to focus on his diet. This is improving his mental health, and has broken the downward spiral.

    Insulin has had benefits for him outside the usually perceived ones, and I think that needs to be taken into account when discussing this.
     
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  16. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    I don't see @Ronancastled as "demonising insulin."

    He appears to be asking if the above catagory of drugs highlighted have some sort of detrimental effect or possibly become ineffective on a patient, leading to insulin prescribed..?

    But you are quite correct when I say insulin is not a failure. Neither is any other drug. If that is what it takes...
     
  17. jonathan183

    jonathan183 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I believe type 2 is initiated by insulin being too high/high for too long - leading to insulin resistance, stimulating beta cells to produce more insulin will make the situation worse.
     
  18. jaywak

    jaywak Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think all drugs have a side effect we just have to way up the pros and cons , For me it was Turbanafine I probably haven't spelt that correctly but I was prescribed that for a fungal nail infection and became so ill with it and stopped taking it and I got better after a week and a few months later the nail infection naturally cured itself as well .
     
  19. Drfarxan

    Drfarxan · Well-Known Member

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    I would like to make something clear which i assume all the users here already understood.When i wrote my comment i was referring to type 2 diabetes who can still produce insulin. Insulin saves lives, it is also great as first treatment when i was first diagnosed my bp shot up to 300 mg/dl i could only bring it down with insulin.
    But in my opinion for type 2 diabetes who can still produce insulin insulin should be avoided as much as possible. My father survived for 30 years with diabetes,he also got it at an early age in his 30s. After starting to use insulin it started going down hill very fast. All the complications started like it was out of no where from retinopathy to diabetic renal diseases. Now was it because of insulin, age or other factors. Then i started following the lchf circles reading their article and watching their videos. It clicked that insulin might have had a part to play. That insulin might be responsible for organ damage for type 2 diabetes, that is people with insulin resistance in their tissues. He was gradually getting those complication but not at the rate of when he started using insulin.
     
    #19 Drfarxan, Sep 25, 2021 at 1:10 PM
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2021
  20. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    how old was your father when he started on insulin, and how long had he been diabetic at that point? Was he a type 2, a type 1, or LADA or MODY?
     
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