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Don't know what to think or do. Very confused.

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by bopeep12300, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. bopeep12300

    bopeep12300 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Been diagnosed type 2 approx 3 weeks now. On Metformin 2x500mg. My dn said I don't need to test my blood myself as I would never go high enough to have a hyper attack. She said I don't need to count carbs or anything just eat healthy. But she said that it was possible for me to go too low into hypo. I've noticed a few times if I've been busy & not ate for a few hrs, my tounge gets tingly & I feel bit dizzy. I've looked it up & it seems like my levels too low & I need to eat. So I do & after about 10mins or so I'm ok.
    I mentioned this today & she said that shouldn't happen because Metformin won't let you go too low. Now that's the opp of what she said before & now I'm totally confused. If I don't test then how do I know if I'm low or not? What should I eat & how often should I eat? My heads all over the place trying to figure this all out.
    I'd be so delighted if anyone would please take the time to advise me on this. Thank you.
     
  2. Madbazoo

    Madbazoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Daisy will be able to give you a lot of useful information and I am sure you will get that response very soon. Read it all and the continue to ask questions on here.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  3. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    If you have a meter, regularly check your bloods for going too low. It is possible to have hypos while on metformin. I know because I no longer take it as my bg level was getting too low too often. I have since stabilised.
    As long as you follow the advice that is given on this forum and try the right diet for you. You may reduce your metformin.
    Challenge your GP, see if you can see a diabetic nurse etc.
    Always eat small amounts often. that works for me.
     
  4. bopeep12300

    bopeep12300 Type 2 · Active Member

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    It was the diabetic nurse I saw. I don't have a meter as she said I didn't need it.
     
  5. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    get a free meter from here or facebook just so you can get an idea really. DSNs dont recommentd testing for a lot of type 2s but from what I've seen a high number do test so they have an idea whats happening.
     
  6. bopeep12300

    bopeep12300 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thanks. How do I get all the stuff for testing?
     
  7. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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    The SD Codefree bg meter is not available for free but many can buy it on eBay and Amazon as the distributor is the same. Its a fairly good meter and although it doesn't have all the bells and whistles that the more expensive meters have, its still very good and teststrips are under £7 inc postage for 50 so would suit most people's budgets.

    I think many type 2's would benefit from testing their bg levels while they alter their consumption of carbohydrate and then by doing so will be able to find out just how much carb they can eat without making their bg levels go too high. Usually though, once people adapt to eating less in carb and a bit more in the green type veg, most people find that their bodyweight reduces and by doing so, the pancreas doesn't struggle along with the many other internal organs within the human body.
     
  8. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    Hi bopeep :)

    I posted this info for you on one of your previous threads so I expect you have already seen it. I hope it helped you.
     
  9. bopeep12300

    bopeep12300 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thank you so much everyone. I really do appreciate every bit of advice. Thank you :)
     
  10. Kat100

    Kat100 · Guest

    Hi bopeep,
    Yes my gp confirmed that you can get hypo,s when on metformin as the blood sugar levels drop....

    I know when mine go low, just like you described....
    I have my review and hba1c soon so will see what happens..not all t2 ,s are encouraged to use a meter...I am very needle phobic and I don't test at the moment, but was informed by gp that there was no need to...

    I try to eat at regular times and try to remember to have snacks something I am not used to doing....
     
  11. bopeep12300

    bopeep12300 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Yesterday, 7:35 pm
    Hi bopeep,
    Yes my gp confirmed that you can get hypo,s when on metformin as the blood sugar levels drop....

    I know when mine go low, just like you described....
    I have my review and hba1c soon so will see what happens..not all t2 ,s are encouraged to use a meter...I am very needle phobic and I don't test at the moment, but was informed by gp that there was no need to...

    I try to eat at regular times and try to remember to have snacks something I am not used to doing....


    Thank you. That's very reassuring :)
     
  12. Joss52

    Joss52 · Member

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    It can be quite a traumatic experience when you are first diagnosed, and there can be so much information to deal with, which, if you are not careful, can be confusing and overwhelming.
    Metformin will help to reduce your blood sugar levels, but you need to play your part, too. The advice to eat a healthy diet (and exercise regularly) DOES help. My GP tested me every 3/6 months initially. In 7 years I've never tested myself.
    Try not to miss a meal. Sensible eating is really the key to dealing with this, and you should have a meeting with a dietician to give you further guidance.
    Like I said, it can be traumatic news, and you will hear and read all kinds of nonsense about diabetes treatment. Take it with a pinch of salt. Literature from Diabetes UK is really good, including recipe books from various chefs, such as Anthony Worral-Thompson. You will find your favourite recipes.
    Talk to your support team if you need help. Ask questions if you are confused.
    Good luck!
     
  13. fireblade

    fireblade Type 2 · Member

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    Oh dear..sounds all bad..but hey..me too and thousands of us..it really really isnt anything to worry about..eat healthy and ask your G.P to refer you on to a a course called Expert Diabetes. .fantastic course..puts your mind at ease and covers absoultly everything and more..

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  14. trevord

    trevord Type 2 · Member

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    Hi
    I was diagnosed a few months ago and was prescribed Metformin. It played havoc with my stomach so GP changed to Amarel.
    BUT I don't need to take any meds now.
    I had a meter prescribed and tested 6 times a day. Before and 2 hrs after each meal. I then went onto a Low Calorie, Low Fat and Low Carb diet. Basically eating nothing more than meats and veg plus lots of milk.
    My BG has stablised around 10.0 mg/l . If I am naughty and have carbs then I take a couple of CINNAMON tablets. If I do take an Amarel pill because of an abnormal reading then 3 hrs after I go Hypo. Always carry sugar lumps and Twix bar with me.
    Now I test only before meals and am very happy with the results, also the GP
    A side effect is that I have lost over 17 kilo. At over 117 kilo I really needed to. On this diet my weight is reducing now between 0.5 and 1 kilo a week. Really feeling better than I have for years.

    Meals
    Breakfast 2 Weetabix no sugar and plenty of Milk. Unsweetened Coffee
    Mid Morning Unsweetened de-caffeinated Coffee
    Lunch Plate of Assorted cooked meats / cocktail sausages / tomato or a Pot Noodle. Unsweetened Tea & Cereal Bar
    Mid Afternoon As Mid Morning
    Evening Cold Meat Salad. or Bolognaise mix with added veg / Stir Fry no rice/ Full English Breakfast etc etc

    Foods to avoid
    ANYTHING with flour, Rice or Pasta. Fats allowed but only in moderation, I like Cheese. Keep alcohol intake low When I have achieved my target weight I will relax the diet and slowly introduce more carbs into the diet, but carefully monitor the BG

    Best of Luck to all
     
  15. Richard871

    Richard871 Type 2 · Member

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    I had the same dismissive reply from my Dn but I wrote a letter to my gp asking for the prescription for test strips and got a meter when I explained that nice guidelines recommend for the education of type 2 diabetics that a meter is used and that if they wanted me to manage this effectively then there's no excuse not to prescribe them. I was diagnosed back in March and it can be scary as heck. You've done the right thing on coming here for help and advice but paramount is see your primary health carer be it your gp or Dn it doesn't hurt going to see them with a better idea of what to ask.

    Sent from my C6903 using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
  16. dalesman

    dalesman Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi, I was diagnosed with T2 6 months ago, I am on Metformin x 2 500 mgs a day and like you I was told that I didn't need to test, however I didn't think that was right, so I bought myself a Bayer Contour Next USB meter with all the bits and started testing myself daily, I took the evidence of my readings to my second meeting with the Diabetic Nurse who upon seeing the readings that I should be testing myself and agreed to put the test strips on repeat prescription... moral to the story,.... feel what your body is saying to you, and go with what you feel is the correct solution for you... I felt that I needed to know what my blood readings were so I could monitor them, it turns out i was right to test myself each morning before breakfast...my readings were all over the place, now because of the meter and how I use my diet, my readings are within the acceptable type 2 scale.. good luck :)
     
  17. Nanonet

    Nanonet Type 2 · Member

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    I am newly diagnosed 2 months ago now. was advised to cut out sugar, use reduced sugar etc., , which is awkward for me, as I havn't used sugar in my diet for over 40 years,(except what is naturally in food) plus a low fat, lactose free (for other medical conditions) So was wondering how to control the diet, as I was already eating a healthy diet. Found it all very confusing, until I found Diabetes. co. uk. I decided to take the advice , to get a monitor and am so glad I did, at first the readings were too high, now I find with the help of the monitor it showed me what foods were making it high, I now have a diet that keeps within the recommended the blood glucose levels . I also feel lot better. Still got a lot to learn. :D
    As I was already on a healthy diet, I was told that the next time I go to see the Diabetic Nurse, (beginning of January) I would be given tablets, this I am trying to avoid, I would sooner control by diet , if possible. So here's hoping that the next blood test results, will show I don't need tablets. (The reason I don't want tablets, is because I already have gastric problems, and I hear that the tablets for diabetes, can give one an upset tum, so Im trying to avoid them. We will see.
    Hugs Nanonet.
     
  18. DavidGould

    DavidGould · Newbie

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    First let me say that you should not get stressed at living with Diabetes...stress affects your levels. I am not sure about the advice you are getting. First yes you can get hypos when taking Metformin and I just wish Health Professionals could stop giving the wrong advice about this.
    Second about meters. Get one. You are having to plot a new course in life and need all the help you can get. No one can tell you how your individual body will react to any combinations of foods and drinks, stress and tiredness, illness or being fit. Only you can find these things out and the only way is by monitoring both before and after meals for the first months until you learn your bodies' reaction. Find out what meter is most used by your local practice (possibly One Touch who are superb by the way and have a help team of diabetics on the end of the telephone to help you)...so that you can get the lancets and test strips (should be free but I know some surgeries are being tight fisted over these essential items.
    Clearly you suspected that your so called 'Health Professional' was giving you a load of baloney because you came on here. I have been type 2 for nine years and believe strongly that the patent has to become an expert at managing their own condition. Mine has over time progressed even with very careful diet and I am now on both metformin and insulin. It is not the end of the world and I feel I am still managing my condition rather than the other way around.
    Diabetes UK also have some very useful helplines and will give you enormous support and they have me over the years. Good luck with learning about what your body will and will not take...it differs from person to person.
     
  19. Tom Cosens

    Tom Cosens · Member

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    At age 79 and after a major operation in Feb this year found I had D2 with a blood sugar of 30 ! Perscribed Gliclazide which is insulin based plus 4 x 500gm Metformin. Now off Gliclazide as readings too low. Ideal reading to look for is 4 - 7 . Hospital gave me a test kit and I get the strips on NHS. Reliably told that Metformin will not give you an hypo [below 4]. I also find myself tired with symptoms of a hypo plus no energy but put this down to a tight regime of no sugar based drinks or food. my weight has dropped from 90Kilo to 83Kilo. Exercise is also very important. Being on a non sugar regime can be very boring, no deserts; chocolates; cakes; alcohol and sugary drinks. It is amazing how much sugar is in various drinks and food, well worth reading the labels. Final advise, get yourself a BS test kit, preferably from Doctor then you will know difference between a low sugar level and just being exhausted.
     
  20. yorkie2210

    yorkie2210 · Newbie

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    I was told just the same as you but I got myself the Acu-chek Mobile for FREE - it came with 50 free test strips.
    I used this and found that I DID need to test myself and I DID need to watch my diet especially on my carbs. and NO carbs from 20.00 onwards in the evening.
    The AcuChek helped me get my regime sorted out in those early weeks - without it I would never have got it right.
    I keep my carbs to 15 gm per meal now and with onlt 500mg metformin per day (I split it into 2 x 250mg) I keep below 5.8 mmol which what I aim for.
    Haven't a clue what that will result in with my HbA1C but I don't really care as I know I have got my daily average down by over 15% anyway - I don't need to test daily now and I know what my diet has to be for my metabolism - I am not a machine like most GP's seem to think we are.
    Eating sensibly is not the solution any more - that is old protocol now and it is time GP's got more up to speed on this stuff.
     
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