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Feel ashamed

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Robbieswan, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. lynnnora2

    lynnnora2 Type 2 · Member

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    What a lovely bunch of people on this site! I have never read so many supportive kind words. So happy to be a part of it.
     
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  2. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    There's nothing to be ashamed of being a diabetic. I am recently a diagnosed type 1 and I was devastated. My main issue was the needles and injecting, which is not that bad. I went to collect my prescription the other day and I felt a right hypochondriac as the bag of goodies that was passed to me was huge. This would have cost a fortune, but I look at it as that I have paid into the NHS for 25 years and by trying to control my condition I will hopefully be paying in for roughly another 25 years.

    I can relate to you punching the wall as just before I diagnosed I kept having mood swings. Unbeknown to me this was down to my blood sugars. I had a slight argument at home about skinny fries ( i wanted normal chips) and I got ready for work and left the house in a foul mood. When I got in the car I was still steaming and I punched my windscreen and broke it. That was an expensive tantrum. Since I have my sugars under control im less angry ( I say less, as I've always been a bit of a hot head).

    It's hard being a diabetic especially being newly diagnosed as your whole concept of food and drink has to change. I was on edge all the time when I was diagnosed but 4 months on I'm a lot better, but there are a lot of situations that I have not come across yet. I have tried to get as much info as I can to help me be prepared for anything that diabetes throws up.
     
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  3. Glenmac

    Glenmac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No need to feel anything but good about yourself,a lovely daughter to be proud of and a wife who kept us all in touch yesterday when we were all so anxious for you.Thankyou Beverley!This diabetes is a huge thing to take on board.I was blue lighted to hospital to then receive my diagnosis and the whole experience takes time for you and your family to recover.Just give yourself time.This is a time to be proud of our NHS and the staff who are part of it and just grateful they are there 'at point of need'.Take things slowly now sorting out your insulin.There are people on this site and your own medical people who will be there for you when needed.
     
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  4. MikeTurin

    MikeTurin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    After two years or so of diagnosis I have stopped to have mood swings and to be angry.
    I've found I have also an heart condition that is hereditary and the same my dad has and cause primary hypertensions and increased heart attack risks.
    I have an "embrace the sh*t" attitude like Marines :)
    People that judges em bas due diabetes and don't are willing to learn the explanation are firmly in the category jerks and treated and considered as they deserve. And life is too short to be angry.
    Absolutely true.

    About NHS the true thing is that the whole concept of public health is based on the fact that some people will need support, sometimes costly lifetime support, and everyone must contribute.
    Some people in NHS and goverment are thinking that ill people are a burden for NHS, but it's like that for a train company passengers are a burden because they are filling the trains and new coaches and engines are costly.
     
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    #44 MikeTurin, Oct 24, 2017 at 10:15 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2017
  5. engie1967

    engie1967 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Bless you. This TED talk was recommended to me, hope you find it interesting:
     
  6. Down-Jai 001

    Down-Jai 001 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    One way or the other,it takes time to manage your own condition:understand FOOD DIET AND EXERCISE and many more.
    I am so glad that the great comfort and support is here.
     
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  7. phdiabetic

    phdiabetic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's ok, everyone feels that way sometimes. Every day I wish my blood sugars would be ok for just a little bit so I could sleep or walk to class or just sit peacefully without worrying about dropping dead. But there are so many fun things I look forward to every day that it makes up for all the time I spend low/high/on a rollercoaster. On this forum we all understand what it's like to live with diabetes so keep posting and sharing your thoughts with us, it feels much better to know that you're not alone. You're doing the best you can with what you've got and so you're definitely not being a burden - you deserve access to things that will help you stay alive. Hope you're feeling better soon!
     
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