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Feeling Annoyed

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by TraceyBills, Sep 20, 2016.

  1. TraceyBills

    TraceyBills Type 2 · Member

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    I have been newly diagnosed with with Type 2 diabetes. Yesterday I thought I was having an appointment with a diabetic nurse, which turned out to be one of the practice nurses. I came out of the appointment none the wiser of how to deal with diabetes, foods to avoid, etc. Don't get me wrong, I am not panicking about it as already having family members with diabetes I know the basics, but to be given no information whatsoever, I just find this pretty poor. So hopefully with the help of this website and help from the lovely people posting on here, I will be heading in the right direction to dealing with this.
     
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  2. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Hi @TraceyBills :)

    Let me firstly tag @daisy1 for you as she has some useful basic information.

    I don't think you're the first person to be disappointed with your practice nurse. Did you not even get some leaflets? Do you have to go back to the surgery again? Are you on any meds?

    Do feel free to,ask any questions you want here :)
     
  3. TraceyBills

    TraceyBills Type 2 · Member

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    Hi Azure,

    Thanks for the tag, will have a look. No leaflets at all. Have to go back in 3 months for blood test. No not on meds, so I do know it is diet controlled, but still pretty miffed, sure I'll get there though. :)
     
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  4. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. You are not alone in getting little practical advice so read around. The advice that new members get is very good. The fact that you are being given the opportunity to try to control with diet alone is promising but you have to find a diet and form of exercise that you can commit to for life. I found keeping a simple spreadsheet helped me but it is not for everyone, find what works for you and good luck.
     
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  5. bobrobert

    bobrobert Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You were a lucky person in not getting any information? It meant that you didn't get off to a bad start and a good start awaits you here!
     
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  6. lynn007

    lynn007 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If it wasn't for my cousin I be exactly the same because when I went the dietician even she wasted my time. Your on your own unless you look in google.
     
  7. TraceyBills

    TraceyBills Type 2 · Member

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    My mum lives in Spain, and when she was diagnosed out there, she was given loads of information, lists of best foods to eat and ones to avoid, etc. Here you get nothing.
     
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  8. mariavontrapp

    mariavontrapp Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I agree with bobrobert, it's better to get no information than wrong information. Put a bit of time into reading about diet, particularly reducing carbohydrates, and also I would recommend using a blood sugar monitor.
     
  9. TraceyBills

    TraceyBills Type 2 · Member

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    I am reading up on diet. Where do I get a blood monitor from?
     
  10. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Many Type 2s find it useful to
    Type 2s usually have to buy their own meter if they choose to use one, unless they're on particular meds.

    The SD Codefree meter is most popular due to the cheaper strips. The price of the strips is the issue so don't be misled by cheap meters as often the strips that they need to,use them are more expensive.
     
  11. brianronald

    brianronald Type 2 · Newbie

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    I feel your pain. I had the same experience only weeks ago. Still confused.
     
  12. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  13. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @TraceyBills - Hello and Welcome to the Forum. :). Don't be afraid to ask questions, we are here to help, support in whatever way we can. There will always be someone to answer your questions. :)
     
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  14. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @TraceyBills

    Hello Tracey and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information, as tagged above, which we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. It contains a lot of advice on diet and a link to the Low Carb Program which you might like to try. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 210,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  15. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi and welcome. Join the club! I had exactly the same treatment but from the practice diabetes GP. I was sent away for 3 months with a scrappy and absurd diet sheet despite very high blood sugar. For your next appointment do make sure you arrange for the blood test and urine sample around 2 weeks before the 3 month review (which you may also need to setup). This enables you to discuss results with the nurse. If your Hba1C is a bit on the high side you will be prescribed Metformin
     
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  16. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    By the time I got an appointment to see a diabetes nurse I had already figured out low carb high fat. She told me I should follow the standard "eat low fat and high carb" advice, and then my diabetes would get progressively worse, I'd be on more and more meds, I'd get diabetes related complications, and eventually I'd be on insulin. Now a couple of years later and my blood glucose levels are in the 'normal' range and she thinks my diet is unhealthy. So, I agree you are probably better off not getting the standard advice. You are better off getting advice from this forum from people who have managed to normalize their blood glucose levels.
     
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  17. MissMac

    MissMac · Well-Known Member

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    Just as everyone has said, it might well be your saving that you did not get any info as it would have been the big time damaging eatwell plate....that is known as the eat your way to certain hell plate in my house! Luckily I too found this site and quickly learnt about LCHF, it's only been a couple of months and it gets easier for sure! As for the meter, I got the SD codefree and though the price of the strips is going up they are still the cheapest out there.
    This forum is your bible...the advice and support is beyond anything you will have experienced before...so I won't say welcome as who wants to be here but ummm....how do! xxx
     
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  18. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    I'm so very pleased to read you're finding things are getting a bit easier these days, because, like so many of us, the initial diagnosis and initially conflicting information undermined your confidence.

    It's certainly not an easy time @TraceyBills , but take it steady and ask for support when you feel you need it. It's exactly what we all did. Welcome to the club nobody wants to join.
     
  19. _lyn_lyn_1963

    _lyn_lyn_1963 · Guest

    Hi I cut out all sugary foods and have reversed my pre diabetis numbers, just because family members have it don't except that as not to do anything, there is lots you can do to return your numbers to normal if you put in the effort and have the patience of a saint, learn lots on here a plan you own journey for you, you know what you eat and need to cut back on. Low carb and pure carb is sugar so there's a good start, it takes a few months of hard effort to get results there are no quick fixes put in the time and your body will repay you. Balls in your court.
     
  20. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Lyn, if I may comment on your post.

    Whilst a very good proportion of us on this site are able to significantly improve our lot, when it comes to our Diabetes, Pre-diabetes or whatever, it's a frustrating reality that some people just aren't significantly impacted by dietary aspects. On that basis, I always feel it doesn't seem quite fair to suggest everyone does very well without medication.

    For me, things worked out very well, but it's just not so for everyone. Sometimes there are other issues in play to complicate matters.

    @TraceyBills , I do wish you well. Hopefully you'll be part of the majority as you get your head around things.
     
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