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Feeling Annoyed

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by TraceyBills, Sep 20, 2016.

  1. Gren S

    Gren S Type 2 · Newbie

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    When so much money from the NHS budget is spent on Diabetes it a wonder that GP surgeries still use basically unqualified practice nurses to 'look after' newly diagnosed diabetics. We all have questions, fears and stresses that would be better handled by a trained diabetic nurse. In the long term, good quality advice at diagnosis would save time, stress and money.
     
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  2. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    I guess I am one of the fortunate ones in that my GP Surgery Practise is 1 of a group of 7 and we have a Diabetic Nurse and Practise Nurse in each Practise.
     
  3. Gren S

    Gren S Type 2 · Newbie

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    I also am very lucky in that my GP is a diabetes specalist and the practice als has a trained diabetic nurse but in talking to other diabetics locally, the picture elsewhere is patchy with some people having similar experiences to 'Feeling Annoyed'.
     
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  4. swirlygirly

    swirlygirly · Newbie

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    Sorry you had a such a pants appointment. In the interests of bonding; I was diagnosed with anaemia shortly after one of my diabetes reviews, to which the "diabetes specialist" at my doctors advised me to drink fresh orange juice as that helps the body to absorb iron...yeh...

    There is so much useful information on here though, I'm sure you'll find be able to find out all you need to know and more! It's a personal journey though, so don't be disheartened if something that works for one isnt as successful for you.
     
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  5. Beatners

    Beatners Type 2 · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed in May doctor just gave me prescription for tablets no diet advice was given ☹️
     
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  6. TraceyBills

    TraceyBills Type 2 · Member

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    Ok, so I'm looking at the blood sugar monitors, and there is one for reading in mmo/L and the other reading in mg/dL. I have no clue whatsoever what these are. Help!!!!
     
  7. delmcp

    delmcp Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    mmo/L is the UK standard unit of measurement and mg/dl is the US standard unit of measurement so choose the mmo/L if you are in the UK. I hope this helps.
     
  8. lynn007

    lynn007 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thats great they should do it here
     
  9. garyjakings

    garyjakings Prediabetes · Newbie

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    I feel like many others, newly diagnosed with Type 2 seen my GP, seen the practice nurse got an appointment for February 2017 for Diabetic clinic (What a joke.) waiting for an eye test. Came out with very little information, a very basic information sheet on food totally confused. I have always tried to eat fairly healthy do have the odd treat who don't, exercise is difficult due to preexisting health problems but do what i can. Thought i would be offered some extra help but feel like I'm on my own to deal with it myself.
     
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  10. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I came out of my GP's surgery totally brassed off! I was asked to go up for a review in a month's time - and my GP (who was supposed to be one of the doctors who dealt with diabetes) was asking me why I was there! I had to explain to her that I had tried the dreaded Metformin (which totally didn't agree with me). I was then asked what my average level was and she didn't even suggest testing my levels then! Beggars belief. Anyway she then said I should take double the dose of Gliclizade (up to 80mg twice a day from 40mg twice a day). She gave me no information as to diet and I'm still waiting for my appointment with the specialist diabetic clinic at the hospital. Shall we say frustrating? I think its very much hit and miss as to whether you get information or not, the best thing I think is to do some digging yourself and make yourself well informed. I've bought myself a monitor from Boots (cost me about £30), but worth it. Ask your GP to put your strips and lancets on your repeat prescription and make sure you get the form from the chemist to see about getting your free prescriptions - anyone with diabetes is exempt from paying but you need to get your certificate for this. (I have been exempt since I was 20 as I have an autoimmune disorder and an underactive thyroid - bah humbug - which unfortunately meant I was predisposed to getting diabetes!)

    My fasting levels are between 4.2 (not a good day!) and 5.9. Anything under 4.4 and I am rather wobbly to say the least. I have been watching my carbs and sugar intake (and isn't that a revelation how much sugar is in a Toffee Crisp - gasp!) and have lost over a stone in 5 weeks. Eggs are my best friend - a good source of minerals, protein and essential nutrients. I have been loosely following Atkins - which has some good points and I have been making the effort to do exercise - a brisk 30 minute walk once a day. It's all paying off and I do feel better (not to mention being able to fit into my smaller wardrobe!). If you have a stressful life, the exercise will also benefit as its a great stress reliever.

    I can only say, make yourself informed - you can only benefit from knowing what's going on with your own body.
     
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    #30 Nicksu, Sep 22, 2016 at 2:37 PM
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2016
  11. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @garyjakin - Hello. :) It was the very same when I was diagnosed 16 years ago, given an information leaflet and sent on my way. You have come to the right place on here, you will learn much more from the forum members. Don't be afraid to ask questions no matter how daft you may think they are.:)
     
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  12. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @garyjakings, part of the trouble is that what we have been told is a healthy diet, (low fat, 5 portions of fruit and veg etc) is based on some shaky science that was trumpeted loudly and so taken as being correct. The good news is that you can ignore the 'low fat' options because usually they have added sugars (just read the label and see how many things end with _ose). Your best friend will be a bg meter and a food diary to find out what causes a large rise. Some of us find that grain products are a problem, so bread, cakes, biscuits are off limits. Remember that excess stress, pain and illness may rise your bg. You may find that you lose weight initially if you don't want to lose more look for the 'healthy fat' foods - olives, avocado, fish. Treats come in tiny amounts, a couple of squares of good quality chocolate but taste all the better. It sounds restrictive but you rediscover cheeses, eggs, assorted salad ingredients etc
    You will find that by the time you reach New Year you will feel that you have taken control of your own health, know how your own body reacts to foods and exercise. You are not alone, ask questions on the forum and wherever you are, whatever time, there is usually someone else around who may be able to help. When you have to find out for yourself it is a steep curve but the learning is better and more thorough.
     
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