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Feelings

Discussion in 'Parents' started by pj09, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. pj09

    pj09 · Member

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    I've just been diagnosed with type 1 and I hate having to do my insulin jabs. :cry:
    I feel really upset/angry that I have to do it. Does anyone else feel like this? Do you ever stop feeling like this?

    PJ
     
  2. Jen&Khaleb

    Jen&Khaleb · Well-Known Member

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    You might get lots of replies from parents in this part of the forum. As a mum, I can say that the health and wellbeing of my child outweighs any feelings I might have about being angry/upset at diabetes and I'm sure those that love you would feel the same way. When my son was first diagnosed it was very upsetting and challenging. Parents often express feeling guilty for their child having diabetes. We also all feel a lot of grief for the life before diabetes and the difficulties that can be faced managing a relentless condition. I think there are always times when diabetes can produce many emotions but the big picture is to have good control and keep doing all the things you did before and take advantage of all the opportunities that come your way. Everything takes a bit more planning and sometimes a bit extra time but the reward is a long and healthy life that you can be proud to have achieved. Having a good attitude will make all the difference to how well you cope every day. You have diabetes, You don't have to like it but you do have to do all the right things that comes with it. Keep smiling :)
     
  3. pj09

    pj09 · Member

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    Thanks for replying that has really helped me.

    PJ :D
     
  4. wsmum

    wsmum · Well-Known Member

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    Another mum here ... my son has been T1 for just over 6 months now and he says he's used to injecting now - really doesn't mind it any more. He's less keen on the finger pricking but even that has got better with time. Hope you feel a bit better about it all soon :)
     
  5. pj09

    pj09 · Member

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    Thanks. I am more keen on my finger prick then my insulin jabs. :D PJ
     
  6. SandraR

    SandraR · Active Member

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    Hi

    My son was diagnosed in towards the end of Yr 6, so within a few months he was not only learning to cope with the condition, but preparing to move to secondary school too.

    Looking back, I would say it took a long while for him to adjust to his condition. He was very angry and frightened to begin with. He got cross with school teachers and tended to have panic attacks when his blood sugars went low.

    I certainly noticed that my son's emotions were all over the place for many months after diagnosis - he just wasn't the same person he had been before. Unfortunately, erratic blood sugars do affect moods, so there is both the emotional impact of the diagnosis and the effect of the sugars too - Double-whammy!

    However, by the end of the year, things were beginning to look better and he felt much more confident that people at school understood his needs and would support him. He began to enjoy school again . It took even longer for him to be confident about being in places other than school or home and even now, this is still a work-in-progress situation as he spends more time out with his friends.

    It is almost 4 years since my son was diagnosed and he is back to being the happy and relaxed person he used to be. He no longer resents his diabetes (well, not often anyway!) and although he wishes it were otherwise, he does completely accept the changes. It made a big difference when my son switched from injections to an insulin pump too because that made his daily life much more normal and flexible.

    If your diagnosis was weeks or months ago, probably people around you think that it's old news and no longer a drama. Personally, I would say it could remain a big deal for you for some time to come and that different people take their own time to recover from the trauma - so just don't expect too much of yourself too soon. Typically, after any life-changing trauma, there is a phase of shock, a phase of denial (anger) and there should eventually a phase of acceptance. Some people might need expert help if they get stuck in the shock/denial phases and just can't move on towards acceptance.
     
  7. SiobhanWright<3!

    SiobhanWright<3! · Member

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    hey PJ :) ! you should soon get used to doing your jags, it will become second nature. there will always be times where you get a little annoyed (i do too!) but you must make sure you always do them or you will get very ill..i sound like my mum hehe! feel free to talk to me if you like, hope this made you feel a little better, byee!
     
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