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First Time Posting / Back Injury

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by The Kerryman, Jan 22, 2013.

  1. The Kerryman

    The Kerryman · Member

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    First time posting on the Forum.
    I have been diagnosed as Type 2 for over 10 years. 52 year old male, 2 1/2 stone overweight , having already lost 2 1/2 to date.
    After a number of months with stomach problems I spent Christmas Eve and Day vomiting.
    Here's the fun part!
    In doing so I ended up with a bulging disc, pressure on a nerve and continued pain in a hip flexor.
    As soon as I can lie face down without pain I will be going for a MRI scan.

    My Hba1c was already high, at over 8 ( in old money). My morning reading is seldom in single figures, usually 10 to 12, but my ability to take any activity is very limited.
    I can painfully get in to the swimming pool and walk up and down a few times but that is it.
    My doctor and physio have prescribed gentle stretches, which I do 4 times a day, painfully.

    I do not want to end up with blood sugar problems to add to the physical issues and would welcome any advice, recommendations and ideas from anyone who has found themselves in a similar situation.
    many thanks.
     
  2. Tracey69

    Tracey69 · Well-Known Member

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    HI
    I have had back pain for several years, i was even on morphim=ne for a couple of years. I have had several MRI which said i had wear and tare, but i saw another pain specialist and he had come here from Australia and he looked into my Facet joints.
    I have had L5 to L2 injected a couple of years ago and only now i am getting problems again.
    If you do what the physio says it may wise even if you can only do a couple each time.
    Stress can upset sugar levels, and pain in some cases. To keep your sugar levels low try to carb count, try to keep a healthy diet, not always possible i know.
    Sorry it doesn't seem much help but i sympothise with you.
    Take care.
    Tracey
     
  3. The Kerryman

    The Kerryman · Member

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    Thank you Tracey, my blood sugar is high now due to inactivity. The low carb diet is good advice, thank you.
    Hope your back pain improves and thank you for your reply.
     
  4. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have lumbar spinal stenosis (Google it) for which I take 20mg Nortryptilene at night. The stenosis is caused by overgrowth of the facet joints which can trap nerves and result in my right thigh muscle in permanent cramp and me walking about bent double, when if flares. I've also got at least one bulging disc.

    The Nortryptilene is an opioid usually used in much higher doses for depression, but it also relieves nerve pain. No other painkiller touches it; I was on 2 Tramadol 4 times daily with no effect whatsoever! Worth asking your GP if you can try it.

    As for diet - look at Viv's Modified Atkins Diet, which is a Sticky Thread on the Low Carb section. It works; I've lost 4 stone so far, and I can't exercise. You don't have to go as low as 25g carb daily if you don't want; get a carb counter book and add in extra carbs to the level you require - maybe 100g daily? you can always go lower if you need to. Try to get your carbs from veg and a little fruit if possible.

    It's a good basic diet, and you can easily build on it. You won't go hungry as you can eat as much as you like of allowed foods, unless an amount is given. If you go for more carbs, cut the fat intake bit. Carbs plus fat = weight gain - at least for me! Fat without carbs = weight loss. :D

    Hope this helps. Let us know how you get on.

    Viv 8)
     
  5. The Kerryman

    The Kerryman · Member

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    Viv, I really appreciate your sharing and your information on the diet.
    I need to really look into this as even before the injury my weight loss had plateaued.
    I was getting quite concerned as my bloods had been rising daily and despite some basic modification there did not seem to be any stop to it.
    Great help, thanks :D :D
     
  6. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    Hi Kerryman and welcome to the forum :)

    Here is the information we give to new members which you will find helpful, in addition to Viv's Diet. Carry on asking questions and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find well over 30,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes ... rains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips
    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  7. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I forgot to add, Kerryman, that when the stenosis flares (ie, when the nerve is trapped/pinched) the worst pain is in my right hip. It feels as if someone has stuck a red-hot skewer into the joint and is keeping a lighted Bunsen burner under the other end.

    Outside the flares, I have constant lower back pain caused by the muscles cramping. I can't walk or stand for long; I use an exercise bike whenever I can afford to go to the gym, but I'm not allowed to use any other apparatus.

    It's worth asking about lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). I had it for 25 years, gradually getting worse, until a really bad episode had me in hysterics all over my GP (works a treat :wink: ). He suggested LSS, prescribed the Nortryptiline, and sent me to the Spinal Rehabilitation Unit. I saw the Senior Physiotherapist, who listened to me very carefully, made me walk up and down the corridor (I throw my right leg slightly out because of it) and said he didn't really need to examine me - my history was classic! However, he sent me for an MRI scan, and there it was - overgrowth of the facet joints leading to narrowing of the nerve channels and pressure on the nerves to the leg(s). It can also affect the nerves to the bladder and cause incontinence. Sometimes I get numbness and tingling at the front of the lower leg, which is also a classic symptom.

    It can be operated on to remove the excess bone on the facet joints and open up the nerve channels, but they prefer to leave it as long as possible as there are obviously risks with any operation on the spine.

    Now I know what the problem is I feel so much better about it, and about myself. I thought it was all caused by me being very obese, but the physio says not - and I don't get any lessening of the pain when I lose weight, though that obviously makes movement easier.

    Let us know when you get that MRI scan. :D

    Viv 8)
     
  8. Tracey69

    Tracey69 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi The Kerryman,
    How are you doing with your back problems. I am hoping you have managed to get an MRI done now.
    How is the sugar levels doing?
    I am a waiting to go back into have injections in my Facet joints as i am suffering from quite a lot of pain down the left hand side, into my groin and down my leg.
    But i am more interested on how you are getting on as pain is a terrible thing.
    Hope your well.
    Take care
    Tracey
     
  9. the Boissetarian

    the Boissetarian · Member

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    just joined Forums and saw your post and all the replies. Also have back problems but not as severe as yours and others - slipped on water on tiled floor in 2007 and crushed 3 vertebrae - one in the lower back. Was sedentary for a long time and started to put on weight. DIagnosed diabetic2 in 2009; since when have undergone double right knee replacement op 1n 2010 and between the two have not had a lot of excercise over last few years so weight has increased again. Also GP put me on glicalzide - brand name DIamacron - you may not know this name - I live in France now. Which I have now found out can cause weight gain, hence a further increase in weight A week ago I weighed 95kg, am 71 and 165cm tall so BMI levels were very high. Have tried Atkins diet in the past and lost weight, but put it back when I stopped as could not keep up maintenance diet

    I did not think I ate unhealthily until I started to count calories. I downloade MyFitnessPal app on to iPad - very very easy to use and keep track of calories eaten each day - programme records progress which is encouraging to see. Now limit myself to 1330 calories per day, which is plenty. But have also found the 5:2 diet - 5 days eating normally and 2 non-consecutive days eating just 500 calories. Weighed myself today, after just under a week on this "diet" and now weith 92.7kg. Am very happy.

    I agree keeping track of calories is of prime importance - I should also mention that my BS levels are now significantly reduced too. We use mg/dl measurements here so actual figures probably not mean anything to you.

    I would thoroughly recommend this form of maintaining weight and BS levels. More info can be found on http://www.thefastdiet.co.uk. I told my GP before starting but he did not seem very impressed but did not tell me not too. I am hoping to surprise him with the results. I am continuing for a month at the same time keeping a record of what I eat, BS levels, weight etc so that I can present him with the evidence.

    We have now ordered a treadmill so I will start gentle walking each day in the comfort of our home - it is too hot in the summer to walk outdoors here and in the winter I do not feel like going out. So hope to get fitter, loose more weight and control the BS levels

    Thanks too to Daisy 1 - the info you posted was interesting and useful

    regards
    the Boisetarian :thumbup:
     
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