1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2022 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Flu jabs & blood tests

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Sara J, Oct 9, 2014.

  1. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Does it grate you too when, someone has a blood test, inoculation of some sort.
    And they whinge how they hate needles!!

    Do you also want too throw your sharps bin at them & say " kop that "!!!
    It's not a term of aggression but, more frustrating
     
  2. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,107
    Likes Received:
    4,851
    Trophy Points:
    178
    It does a little bit but then people are strange. One of the nurses told me that a patient sued them because they had a sticking plaster applied to them and then claimed to be allergic to them.

    I had my 6 monthly blood test on Tuesday and the nurse, who I have known for 25 years was visibly shaking. It takes a toughie diabetic to allow her to continue in that condition. All I had to do was synchronise with her and we succeeded nicely.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  3. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Thanks for that

    I had too have aload of bloods done few months back.
    3 vials for diabetic clinic 3 vials for haematology.
    The nurse was tapping my veins for about 2 minutes, which made me nervous.
    On the 4 th vial, I said too her. I don't feel right, I then fainted sitting down.
    The nurse continued taking my blood while another nurse held onto me.
    I came round sweating profusely.
    Guess what ?? Hypo !!
    Oh my days !!
     
  4. zand

    zand Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,551
    Likes Received:
    16,409
    Trophy Points:
    298
    lol my blood refuses to come out, it takes forever to do blood tests......now if I sued for every bruise......:);)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    21,807
    Likes Received:
    35,058
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Good grief!

    I get a rash from plaster sticky stuff.

    So I weigh the pros and cons;
    • one square inch of rash on the inside of my elbow, lasting 2 days
    • or risk of one tiny drop of blood inside my sleeve
    • Lengthy court case, cost of legal representation and paying costs when the judge dismisses due to entire ridiculousness of case.
    As you can tell, it's a terrible and agonising decision that takes me half a millisecond to resolve.

    Edited to add: sorry @Sara J , I was so stunned by the Squire's post I forgot to say welcome! :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. minidvr

    minidvr Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    173
    Trophy Points:
    73
    Having blood taken can be a trial. My veins seem to have vanished as I have gotten older. So, it can be a trial while they try to find one. On one occasion, a doctor tried both arms and the back of both hands until I said, enough was enough and got referred to the blood service at the local hospital. I waited a day or so to at least to give the bruises some time to wear down a bit.

    My spouse was in hospital last year. The nurses at the hospital were trying to get canulers into her to allow blood tests and also to dispense medication. They made a real mess of it and they had to bring in a specialist nurse to A&E to put them in. After five days in she had one in each arm and one each in the back of each hand and very colourful it was. We complained to the hopsital about their inability to do this, basic nursing task to be told that nurses are not expected to take blood routinely and that it's a specialist skill??? They had to be trained separately from their normal role for it. What we couldn't understand was why people working in A&E didn't have this specialist training? Surely, this is one of the first things they do for most people who come in there?
     
  7. satindoll

    satindoll Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,084
    Likes Received:
    10,417
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi Sara J welcome, short answer yes, when I was younger I used to do Plasma For Rhesus contributions every six weeks at the local hospital as I have rare antibodies (anti little c) which are used for Rhesus problems in babies and mums, and because of that my elbow veins are shot, so now they use butterfly needles in my ankles, not as painful as it sounds, but sometimes the hole can leak and it can be funny seeing peoples faces as I drip blood across the floor as I walk.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. minidvr

    minidvr Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    173
    Trophy Points:
    73
    Having blood taken can be a trial. My veins seem to have vanished as I have gotten older. So, it can be a trial while they try to find one. On one occasion, a doctor tried both arms and the back of both hands until I said, enough was enough and got referred to the blood service at the local hospital. I waited a day or so to at least to give the bruises some time to wear down a bit.

    My spouse was in hospital last year. The nurses at the hospital were trying to get canulers into her to allow blood tests and also to dispense medication. They made a real mess of it and they had to bring in a specialist nurse to A&E to put them in. After five days in she had one in each arm and one each in the back of each hand and very colourful it was. We complained to the hopsital about their inability to do this, basic nursing task to be told that nurses are not expected to take blood routinely and that it's a specialist skill??? They had to be trained separately from their normal role for it. What we couldn't understand was why people working in A&E didn't have this specialist training? Surely, this is one of the first things they do for most people who come in there?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    @minidvr.
    That's shocking too hear !! Can kind of relate with my late father in law & non existent veins.
    You'd of thought though that nurses were trained in taking blood.
    It's not as if it's a rare thing too do !!
     
  10. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    @minidvr.
    That's shocking too hear !! Can kind of relate with my late father in law & non existent veins.
    You'd of thought though that nurses were trained in taking blood.
    It's not as if it's a rare thing too do !!
     
  11. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
     
  12. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    @satindoll
    Didn't know they could take blood from your ankles !!
    You made me laugh there. I love making people feel squeamish like that
     
  13. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,618
    Likes Received:
    19,625
    Trophy Points:
    278

    Well Sara, I'm a type 1 so have to inject multiple times a day and I hate it when anyone comes near me with a needle, needle phobia is a real condition and many people struggle even just to take life-saving drugs such as insulin, so sorry I don't share your frustration and feel sorry for those who have genuine fear of needles.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    @noblehead
    Fair play too you. I'm type 1 also. Hid in the toilets at school for the rubella & flu jab. Then diagnosed at 12.
    Not a fan of jabs either but, hey we had too get over it & on with it !!
     
  15. satindoll

    satindoll Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,084
    Likes Received:
    10,417
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Strangely its the jabs that dentist give in the gums that I hate, just the sight of that long needle coming towards my mouth gives me the heebie geebies, and my son hates to see me give myself my jabs and will run a mile if I go anywhere near him with a needle in my hand, so what will happen if he ever needs a jab I dread to think he already takes valium for a visit to the dentist.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  16. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Agree with you on the dentist score. No it's not easy for our kids either.

    Think I should've maybe put more thought into my thread.
    I was meaning more of the whinging side than the fear !!
     
  17. Sara J

    Sara J Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Agree with you on the dentist score. No it's not easy for our kids either.

    Think I should've maybe put more thought into my thread.
    I was meaning more of the whinging side than the fear !!
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook