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Foods allowed on my G.I. Diet.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by catherinecherub, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Below is a list of foods that I can eat following a low G.I. diet.

    Before low carbers hold their hands up in horror and protest that they cannot, I would say that it has worked succesfully for me for six and a half years and since diagnosis, my HBA1's have never been above 6.6. and the last eight have been in the low 5's. My last one in June was 5.1. I had four stone to lose at diagnosis and that went within six months.

    BEANS.

    Baked beans, (low fat)
    All beans (tinned or dried).
    Black eyed peas
    Chickpeas.
    Soya beans.
    Split peas.

    BEVERAGES.

    Bottled water.
    Tonic water.
    Decaff coffee with skimmed milk.
    Diet soft drinks, (Caffeine free).
    Light instant chocolate.
    Milk, (skimmed).
    Tea with skimmed milk.

    BREADS.

    1005 Stoneground.
    Wholegrain high fibre, 2 1/2 - 3g. of fibre per slice(Only use 1 slice per serving.)
    Bergen or Vogel Soya and Linseed.

    CEREALS.

    All bran.
    Bran buds.
    High fibre Bran/Alpen.
    Oat bran.
    Large flaked porridge oats.

    CEREAL GRAINS.

    Barley.
    Buckweet.
    Bulgar.
    Rice, (basmati, wild, brown,long grain)
    Wheat grain.

    CONDIMENTS/SEASONING.

    Garlic.
    Herbs and spices.
    Hummus.
    Fat free mayonnaise.
    Fat free sald cream.
    Mustard.
    Soy sauce, (low sodium).
    Teriyaki sauce.
    Vinegar.
    Worcestershire sauce.

    DAIRY.

    Buttermilk.
    Cheese, (fat free).
    Cottage cheese, (low fat or fat free).
    Yoghurt, (fat and sugar free).
    Low fat no added sugar Ice Cream.(Walls to good to be true).
    Skimmed milk.

    FATS AND OILS.

    Almonds.
    Canola oil/rapeseed oil.
    Flax seed oil.
    Hazlenuts.
    Macadamia nuts.
    Olive oil.

    FRESH FRUITS.

    Apples.
    Blackberries.
    Blueberries.
    Cherries.
    Grapefruit. (not if on statins).
    Grapes.
    Lemons.
    Oranges.
    Peaches.
    Plums.
    Pears.
    Raspberries.
    Strawberries.

    OTHER FRUIT.

    Apple sauce, (sugar free).
    Frozen berries.
    Mandarin oranges (tinned in fruit juice).
    Peaches in juice or water.Drain off the juice.
    Pears in juice or water. Drain off the juice.

    THERE ARE NO SUITABLE FRUIT JUICES.

    MEAT,POULTRY, EGGS FISH and SOYA.

    All seafood fresh, frozen or tinned.
    Back bacon.
    Omega 3 eggs.
    Lean cuts of beef.
    Skinless chicken.
    Extra lean minced beef.
    Lean deli ham.
    Quorn.
    Sashimi.
    Soy/whey protein powder.
    Tofu.
    Skinless turkey.
    Veal.

    PASTA.
    Wholemeal varieties only.

    SOUPS.

    All homemade varieties with low G.I. ingredients.
    Chunky bean and vegetable tinned soup.

    SUGARS AND SWEETENERS.

    Aspartame.
    Hermesetas Gold.
    Splenda.
    Stevia.

    VEGETABLES.

    Asparagus.
    Aubergines.
    Beans, (green and runner).
    Bell peppers.
    Broccoli.
    Brussel sprouts.
    Cabbage.
    Carrots.
    Olives.
    Onions.
    Peas.
    Pickles.
    Potatoes, (small portion of boiled new).
    Spinach.
    Swiss chard.
    Sugar snaps.
    Radishes.
    Tomatoes.

    You will still have to test in the early stages as no two people's blood sugars seem to respond the same to an identical meal.
    Over time, I have been able to include other foods as long as the overall value of the meal is low G.I. A must is to have a banced meal and use all the food groups.
    Another must for starting low G.I. is to buy a copy of Rick Gallop's The Low G.I. Diet as he explains the mechanism behind the diet and do's and don'ts plus why portion control is essential. There are also recipes within the book and exercise tips. This book was recommended by all the professionals that I saw.

    I have composed this post so that you will see what is working for me. Unlike some members of this forum, I cannot tell you what will work for you. It may be worth giving it a try.

    Bon appetit.
     
  2. dragongirl

    dragongirl · Well-Known Member

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    Are you type 1 or 2 and are you on meds or not? Just curious!
     
  3. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Hi dragon,
    I am a Type 2 on diet alone. Should have put that in.
     
  4. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thats pretty much the foods that I eat, cereal I only eat occationally as my carb tollerence is worse in the mornings for some reason, so my breakfasts now are usually 1/2 a grapefruit.

    I shall look out for the book you mention catherinecherub, thanks :)
     
  5. Romola

    Romola · Well-Known Member

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    It works for me too Mr Bonkers :)

    I also enjoy taramasalata, and I drink tomato juice instead of fruit juice.
    As you say, portion control is essential.



    No diabetes meds.
     
  6. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    Good to see you Catherine.
    :D :D
    I eat pretty much from that list. The biggest difference is that I can't get the same types of breads but have found through testing which ones are and are not lower GI.
    I'm type 1.5 so have to take insulin.
    Between pregnancy and diabetes (almost 30 years) I struggled to keep my weight in check. Once I'd got back to a normal weight after diagnosis (I was too thin by then), it's remained stable. (many people on insulin gain weight)
     
  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    Catherinecherub

    Quite a extensive list of foods. I have been on a low-gi diet for the last few weeks, but combined with a reduction in carbs to approx 100g daily. I have included wholegrain high fibre breads, all-bran cereal with berries and natural yogurt, sweet potatoes and have started eating beans, lentils and linseeds. I eat this in conjunction with good lean meat, poultry and oilly fish.

    So far, so good. Feel better for my change in diet, the low-gi foods have not raised my bloods above 7-8 post meals, and pre-meal 5-6. Lost about 3Ib which I gained on the low-carb/high-fat diet, and believe reduced carbs and low-gi diet is the way forward in diabetes care. The diet is rich in nutrition and one which I would endorse.

    Nigel
     
  8. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    There's a lot there i couldn't handle, but some I can
    Hana
     
  9. mullaneder

    mullaneder · Well-Known Member

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    well done catherine :D great post,

    dermot
     
  10. cjohnson

    cjohnson · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Catherine

    That is really useful information. I have read the books on low GI etc. but to have it simply listed like this is great, I have printed a copy out to keep handy.

    Thanks
    Chris J 8)
     
  11. ally5555

    ally5555 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Chris

    have you loked at the book by Nigel Denby - he is a Dietitian and must admit I recommend the book to patients.

    Great post catherine .
     
  12. cjohnson

    cjohnson · Well-Known Member

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    Ally

    No I haven't but I will look out for it. Thanks :D

    Chris
     
  13. Jo123

    Jo123 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks catherine that's is a really useful list.
    I want to try to a few low gi foods into my evening meal. Now I have to buy my own test strips as I am not diabetic but only have impaired fasting glucose so I am very frugal with them!
    So what I have done once is try a very small portion of chilli con carne (with kidney beans) served with a salad instead of rice and tested after an hour - result 7.2. Which obviously is not what I want as I aim to keep my 1 hr PP at 7 or below. But do you think this is the best method of testing at just the one hour mark bearing in mind I am paying for my strips. I am keeping my lunch and breakfast low carb as I can't afford to test then. Did try 2 oatcakes a few months ago with cheese and salad and again my 1hr pp was 7.5 so I think I need to focus on my evening meal.
    I have actually got a couple of gi diet books so I am aware of the theory, but I would like to introduce a few more foods into my diet so I was glad to read your post Catherine, Thanks.
     
  14. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Hi jo123,
    Two things spring to mind from reading your post.

    If you didn't know what your level was prior to your meal then it is impossible to know how much it has risen.

    If you are combining low carb and low G.I. throughout the day then it would be difficult as they are not the same strategy so I really do not know if this is a good idea. Low carb is usually high fat and more protein than low G.I. I know that there are variations that some people use with regard to low carbing but the principle is not the same as low G.I. I don't think low carbers would eat beans and lentils or bread rice, pasta and cereals. I think you would have to opt for one or the other. Everyone is different in their response to foods. You will have to test more until you get it right.
    With a shortage of strips you will have to vary when you test and make sure that the other two meals, i,e, breakfast and lunch are ideal levels. Do you ever test when you get up?
    Your choice of two oatcakes, cheese and salad has often been mentioned as something that low carbers can eat.
    I have to say that I find it quite confusing that you are using both methods.


    Catherine.
     
  15. Jo123

    Jo123 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Catherine,
    Thank you for your reply.
    Yes I have tested first thing and have managed to get that down so tend not to test most mornings unless I have eaten something with higher carbs the night before.
    You are right, I should test before the meal to see how much it goes up, I did at the beginning but stopped doing so when I found the levels were acceptable to save strips.

    I am only eating low carb because it is the only thing at the moment that I have found to get my bg levels normal. But low gi doesn't seem massively different only with the additon of low gi carbs. I don't eat excessive amounts of protein and mostly healthy fats (nuts, olive oil etc) with the odd bit of cheese. I just would like to add a bit more variety to my diet and to eat what the rest of the family eat mostly.

    I actually used to use the GI diet to keep my weight the same and not gain it before my diagnosis of impaired fasting bg, so I did enjoy eating this way.
     
  16. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Hi jo123.
    Glad you understood my post.

    With G.I. it is important to use portion control and you need some guide for this. The book I recommended is ideal, don't know if the one Ally mentioned has this.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do. Perhaps you could ask your G.P. for some strips to get you on the right track and use the argument that you don't want to end up with diabetes and so it would be cheaper in the long run. :?:

    Regards,
    Catherine.
     
  17. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Catherine,

    With respect, I think that you are wrong to say that you can't low carb, whilst eating a low-gi diet. Given that the GDA of carbs recommendation is 250g daily, spread mainly over three meal-times, it would be normal for most people to consume 50g or more at each sitting, obviously more carbs are eaten with their evening meal. Therefore, should one decrease this amount to 20-30g of carbs for each meal, then they are technically low-carbing. I myself would prefer to call this a reduced carb/low-gi diet, as I am currently consuming approx 80-100g a day.

    I would use the term low-carbers to some of the many individuals who contribute to the forum, eating 50g or less of carbs a day. Many choose to reduce their carb intake to gain better bg's, pre and post meal times, whilst reducing their insulin/meds, when they find a exceptable level and ratio of carbs/meds to maintain optimum bg's, when this is achieved they have reached their goal.

    I eat beans, pasta and cereal products whilst sticking to below the 100g level I have set, and do not eat a high fat diet/ protein diet, as you may suggest. One thing is for certain, we are all united in the believe that carb reduction improves diabetes control. All the best!

    Nigel
     
  18. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Hi Nigel
    Whilst I agree that all diabetics have to lower their carb intake, there are different degrees.

    I eat approx. 120g of carbs per day and no way would a staunch low carber call me one of their own.
    There have been arguments galore on this forum about what low carbing is and it is not something I really care about. Titles like, "Why low carb has to be high fat" etc. really don't bother me. I would not post in the low carb forum because I would not be welcome. People posting on the non low carb forum eat varying amounts of carbs and that is the place where I would feel most welcome.

    We all have to find what works for us personally and I know that what I am doing works for me. I cannot say what works for someone else.

    I do not want to be defined by the amount of carbs that I eat, I have a personality, friends and a loving family and that is what defines me.

    I am glad that you have found what works for you Nigel, seems really healthy. I really did not think that there was anything in my post that might be controversial. I have been shot down in flames on this forum in the past for thinking that lowering my carb intake meant low carbing.


    All the best,
    Regards,
    Catherine.
     
  19. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    I eat a lot of the list, and items that aren't on the list as well...

    Noblehead

    what youve got tot remeber with the recommended carb amount per day.. this is an adverage reccomadation which means that it relates to an adverage, sized person, of adverage weight of adverage age who has adverage activity! And how many of us are Joe Adverage???

    I eat all sorts, and follow no particular diet, but my adverage carb count is quite low, it's not something that I aim to achieve, it's just the way it works with my eating habits... When I first started insulin 21 years ago, There was little choice but to have carbs and insulin balanced throughout the day... There first suggested and sorted out 180g of carbs per day but after a week and my complaint I was struggling to eat the amount way to much there were more than happy to reduce this to 150g then to 120g which suited me...

    when working out the best carb intake, we've got to remember our height, weight, sex and activity and mobility all have to be taken into consideration as well as the effects/impact on our blood glucose
     
  20. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Catherine,

    Controversial is not what I am trying to imply. I was merely stating that a reduction in carbs can also work equally well with a low-gi, low-fat/protein diet. Should you read my post again, and many others I have written, you will find that we are both singing from the same hymn sheet. I also hate being categorized, and do not want to be known as a low/medium or high carber, but sometimes it is neccesary to stipulate ones consumption when answering a question/query, or as part of a discussion. Hence why I use the term 'reduced' for convenience. I have stated, and I shall say so again, that a carb reduced diet in combination with low-gi foods has profound benefits in diabetes control. This is my personal view!

    jopar,

    You are bang on the nail!

    Regards

    Nigel
     
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