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GPs/Diabetic Nurses Unilaterally Changing Patients' Blood Glucose Meters

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by DavidDK, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. DavidDK

    DavidDK Type 1 · Active Member

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    Have any UK users of this forum had their doctor or diabetes nurse change, without prior consultation, their blood glucose meter for a new blood glucose meter made by a manufacturer whose products you have never used before?

    if so, did your doctor or diabetes nurse provide an explanation why they were changing unilaterally your existing blood glucose meter for a new meter made by a manufacturer whose products you have never used before?

    If so, what reasons were given by your doctor or diabetes nurse for the change?

    I visited my pharmacist to pick up my prescription for test strips for my trusty blood glucose meter which I have been using quite happily for the last few years, to find that I have been prescribed, without my knowledge or consent, tests strips for an entirely new meter (which has not even been given to me yet).

    As far as I am aware, there is nothing wrong with my existing blood glucose meter. As far as I am aware, my existing meter meets current European Union blood glucose meter standards. In the past when there have been issues concerning the accuracy of earlier models of my existing blood glucose meter, the manufacturer of the product has been scrupulous in ensuring they have contacted me, they have paid for me to return the faulty product and provided me with a replacement or the latest device.

    My pharmacist has told me that the unit price of the test strips for the new blood glucose meter my doctor/diabetic nurse have decided unilaterally I must now use are less expensive......by roughly £2 per month.
     
  2. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My surgery changes all meters about 2 years ago - both my dad and I got letters explaining which meter we would be getting - a different one for T1 and T2 - the letter gave a few dates where we could go and collect the meters and offfered training on them if anyone wanted it. The letter also explained the reason why - cost - and the savings in that cost - you were offered the opportunity to argue your case for a different meter.

    All in all I thought my surgery handled it well and gave good reasons and info.

    Can you argue the case for keeping your meter? You may be successful if you put up a good case but it's happening everywhere across the board - good luck
     
  3. DavidDK

    DavidDK Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thanks for your reply Lovinglife

    I hadn't realised clinical commissioning groups have been implementing such measures to save money.

    It seems to me that this is a battle I am unlikely to win. I see from the internet that there are numerous varying accounts about whether the new meter I have been prescribed is as accurate relative to the meter I have been using these past years. However, at the end of the day, the price of the test strips for the new meter is significantly cheaper than my existing meter.

    I now have concerns that in future my attending clinicians will change my medication, which is relatively new and therefore relatively expensive, not for any clinical benefit to me, but in order to save money and balance budgets. That I do care about, particularly as my diabetes is now under control.
     
  4. coleyd

    coleyd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My nurse gave me a 2nd hand monitor n what looks like 50 strips a month prescription. I bought my own meter and if I need to but my own strips I will because it's not worth the stress to me. They all think I'm overreacting testing several times a day ... and I'm a new diabetic
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. coleyd

    coleyd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The 50 strips are never enough I test 6 or 7 times a day
     
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  6. BarbaraG

    BarbaraG Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If money isn't a barrier for you, you might enjoy the Freestyle Libre - it 'tests' automatically every 15 minutes and gives you a graph of the results. You see it every time you scan the sensor - I seem to be doing that 20-30 times per day as I observe the patterns in my BG.
     
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