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Had my latest check-up today.

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Useless Pretty Boy, Sep 18, 2009.

  1. Useless Pretty Boy

    Useless Pretty Boy · Well-Known Member

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    An HbA1c of 5.8... exactly the same as my last one, nine months ago. And apparently the lowest that Glasgow's Gartnavel clinic has ever seen.

    "Borderline miraculous" was the phrase used.

    Yes, I'm gloating. But I'm happy! :D
     
  2. SophiaW

    SophiaW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well done, that's a nice reading to get. The lowest my daughter has got to is 7 but we're hoping now with the basal bolus regime we've switched to that will improve.
     
  3. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Congratulations!
    now you need to educate your care team to show them how their other patients can achieve the miracle
    hana
     
  4. LittleSue

    LittleSue Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well done. I'm aiming for 6, but some way to go yet.

    Had my check up today too. The junior doctor seemed to be running through a checklist of things I didn't need to change, but she said things as if we'd previously talked about making changes, which we hadn't. Eg saying "no, we don't need to change your type of insulin", "no, I don't t hink you should increase your dose", "no, we don't need to change your regime". Phew, since this is the best control I've ever had. I refuse to be un-DAFNE'd! I guess they have a mental checklist to follow, but it came across as puzzlement cos she couldn't tell me to "stop smoking", "change that dose" or "increase that snack" :lol: A touch more gratifying when the consultant agreed :D
     
  5. Shazza

    Shazza · Well-Known Member

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    Son hasnt had one of these tests yet he is due to go to clinic in Oct what kind of results should I expect? I havent a clue!
     
  6. LittleSue

    LittleSue Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Clinic visits usually involve either blood tests being done at the time, or (better) they may be done in advance so the doctor has the results to discuss with you at the appointment. HbA1c (average bs over approx the past 2 months) is a key result. Usually also tests are done for liver and kidney function, cholesterol and thyroid function - though I'm not sure if these apply to youngsters. A urine sample will probably be checked and he'll be weighed and measured. He'll probably have his injection sites looked at and of course his bs diary will be examined. You and he will have the chance to raise any issues or ask any questions that are bothering you or anything you don't understand. Usually its a mixture of encouragement, suggesting any improvements that need to be made, and making sure he understands the importance of taking his insulin, not skipping meals, not scoffing sweets etc that aren't programmed into his regime.

    Usually overall these reviews have a positive tone, but I have one word of caution. If things aren't going well, "the experts" sometimes assume the patient is not bothering to take care of themselves. If they can't fix it, the patient must be lying! So if at any time your son is doing everything right and still having problems, back him up and make sure the doctors/nurses realise there really is something that needs sorting out. I have bitter memories of how soul-destroying it can be to go to clinic begging for help and just get told to pull your finger out and lectured about complications. Wouldn't wish that on anybody.
     
  7. Useless Pretty Boy

    Useless Pretty Boy · Well-Known Member

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    See, to be honest, I'm not entirely sure what it is I do which is so special. I just go through the motions and it turns out pretty well. :mrgreen: I just stay sensible about what I eat, exercise a decent amount and make sure to check my levels frequently. It doesn't seem that tough to me.

    And a first clinic check is a bit of a scary time. You feel as if you're doing everything wrong and that you're never going to be able to get on top of things. But things get better and you're not expected to hit home runs as soon as you start. So if it all seems terrifying and overwhelming when you first start dealing with it, don't worry - it'll get better.
     
  8. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    what I mean is that many medics set such lax targets, that patients think high numbers are OK. they key to it all is in the eating plan. that's what it takes.
     
  9. Useless Pretty Boy

    Useless Pretty Boy · Well-Known Member

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    Ah, I see what you mean. No, couldn't possibly do that... I might risk losing my top spot! :wink:

    To be honest though, I don't believe that it's a doctor's place to impose things like that. It's hardly a secret what happens if you have bad control. It's one of those things most people have to work out and commit to themselves. That kind of dedication to keeping yourself well has to come from within. Having a hard-ass doctor on your case won't produce the same results.

    I found out completely independently of my doctor that such tight control wasn't difficult. In all honesty, it was my fiancée who got my head around it. And that's really the only way to go about it. You've got to decide to do it, you can't have it decided for you.
     
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