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Has anyone ever done a DIY glucose tolerance test and is it possible to do so?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by gardengnome42, Jan 6, 2018.

  1. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I just wondered if it was a good idea or not. I believe Lucozade is what is used yet I understand Lucozade has changed its formula slightly and now contains less sugar. So what's the best thing to use and how accurate is it?
    My reason being that as a borderline diabetic I want to know where I am at, so to speak, before having another HbA1c test and possible finding myself on the register.
     
  2. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Quite a few of us have done a home OGGT. It is very difficult to use Lucozade these days, but very easy if you buy the ready mixed glucose called Rapilose.

    https://www.gpsupplies.com/rapilose-ogtt-glucose-solution-300ml-pack-of-1

    It contains exactly the right mixture, and is used by a lot of doctors.

    These are the instructions for use:
    http://penlanhealthcare.com/uploads/Rapilose-OGTT-Instructions-For-Use.pdf

    You need to be well prepared - as per instructions, and have a timer, your meter and loads of test strips in front of you, with something to record things on. To get the best advantage you need to test at least every 15 minutes from finishing the drink for 3 hours, and must sit still for the whole of that period.
     
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  3. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Bluetit, sounds a lot of faff, perhaps I won't go there!
     
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    I found it easy. I planned it for a Sunday morning when I knew I wouldn't be disturbed provided I had warned Mr. Blue. I had the drink sitting at my desk with my testing gear to hand, and played on my PC for 3 hours, checking emails, browsing and chatting on the forum and elsewhere, and generally having a pleasant relaxing time! You can cut the time down to 2 hours if you prefer. It was my choice to do 3 hours.
     
  5. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Is a home OGTT test very good only using finger pricks tests during or after it as we know they are not 100% accurate. I had to go to the hospital to have mine done to the department where they do blood tests. I had to fast for 12 hours before I went then at the hospital I had a blood test then the glucose drink then a wait of two hours another blood test then went home The first one was not conclusive so I had to have another one
     
  6. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    What kind of blood test did they give you?
    A finger prick or a full blood draw?
     
  7. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Full blood draw
     
  8. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Interesting but I trust my meter pretty much all the time so don't see why it would be any worse for a home OGTT.
    Obviously it won't be as accurate as a full blood test.
     
  9. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Just wondered why anyone already having diabetes do home OGGT tests what does that tell them
     
  10. AdamJames

    AdamJames Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Each individual measurement you take with your meter will be subject to an inaccuracy such that if you connect the dots directly on the graph, you are unlikely to get the true curve.

    E.g. on the up-slope, if you get unlucky, you may see something like:

    (Edit: spaces are lost when posting! I've had to use underscores to move the points to the right, ignore underscores!)

    ___________________*
    _____________*
    _________*
    ____*
    ______*
    __*
    **


    But you can be sure that's not what's happening for real, so you can draw a line through the noise to be more like:

    ___________________*
    _____________*
    _________*
    _____*
    __*
    *


    There will be enough samples to average out any inaccuracy.

    My guess is you can be sure that the shape of your 'cleaned up' curve will be accurate, then it's just a case that the whole graph may be slightly higher or lower than reality, but very informative either way.
     
    #10 AdamJames, Jan 6, 2018 at 6:48 PM
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2018
  11. AdamJames

    AdamJames Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you do, say, one every three months while embarking on a campaign of lifestyle change such as losing weight or starting to eat LCHF, you can compare one to the previous one to see if your curve has a lower peak and comes down quicker, both of which I'd take as a sign you are doing something right.

    What they won't show you is how much insulin was needed to deal with the glucose; two people with the same healthy looking curve could be producing very different amounts of insulin - the person who produces the least insulin probably having the healthiest metabolism.

    Either way, I'd say that if you can do something to lower the peak and reduce the duration, your metabolism is probably improving.
     
  12. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Well you all make it sound fairly straightforward if a little involved so perhaps I'll give it a go. I had an HbA1c taken in October and was told to go back in a year but feel sooner might be a better idea. Meanwhile I'd like to see for myself how things are going before committing myself to another official test at the surgery.
     
  13. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Because its more data. You can see how you react to various inputs to see how much better (if you are getting better) you are getting. That's why we record our blood sugars and weight and HbA1c or at least I do.
     
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  14. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    When OGTTs are done at the GP surgery they use finger prick tests.
     
  15. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Do many of you actually do a home OGTTT
    Presumably that is why when I had my OGTT I was sent to the hospital to have proper blood tests for it
     
  16. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    No idea why you were sent to the hospital. Probably just the protocol at your surgery.
     
  17. CherryAA

    CherryAA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    you can actually do an at home hba1c test if you like . I use these ad they are pretty close to the surgery result
    the outfit that sells them is called A1cNow
     
  18. zamalik

    zamalik Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Its quite old post, but was just wondering how sooner you should be doing an OGTT after diagnosis and lifestyle changes? Secondly, i was reading on NHS website, you need to start eating normally (including carbs) three days prior to testing because otherwise you will shoot up. Now that means you will have to deal with high sugar levels for 3 days of food and then a sudden rise on the day of test. Now my question is, is it worth the spikes? Happy to start a new thread mods?
     
  19. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Prof Taylor measured maximal insulin secretion rates back to normal at 12 months post remission in the follow up to his Direct Study.
    In his previous smaller study, Counterweight, he subjected his 11 "successsful" candidates to a 75g OGTT at 12 weeks & the results were pretty dismal.
    Recommendation is to eat 150g of carbs per day for 3 days prior to test.
    One off spikes, as you'll experience perparing & conducting this test, are unlikely to contribute to complications.
    The advantage is that it establishes a baseline for your insulin sectretion/sensitivity for you to track your progress in the future.
     
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  20. zamalik

    zamalik Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I still have another 9 months to go ....
     
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