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Have you experienced a hypo in hospital?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by UserInvolvement, Aug 6, 2009.

  1. UserInvolvement

    UserInvolvement · Member

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    Have you experienced a hypo in hospital?

    We want to hear from you!


    Diabetes UK and the Joint British Diabetes Societies are holding a series of events to find out how people with diabetes would like healthcare professionals to manage a hypo in a hospital setting.

    The event will be held on Tuesday 25th August from 11am-3pm in central London. Lunch will be provided and all travel expenses will be reimbursed.

    If you are over 16, have had a hypo whilst in a hospital setting and would like to come along to the event, please call the User Involvement team on 0207 424 1008 or email: [email protected]
     
  2. supergob

    supergob Type 2 · Member

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    over two years ago I was diagnosed with prostrate problems and offered an operation called a prostatus. I saw the Consultant who talked me through the operation and said I would need to go in to Hospital on the Sunday and would not be operated on until my diabetes had stabilised. I was therefore surprised to be called in on the morning of the operation to be operated on immediately. I phoned his Secretary who was very unconcerned, so I said I would not be coming in. Later that day I received a call, saying there was a mix up and to attend on the Sunday as arranged. I then received a letter confirming it, but not to take any food or drink. I again telephoned the Secretary and after explaining that I was a diabetic, I was told to take my insulin as usual. At that time I was only taking Nova Rapid 50 CC's in the morning and 65 cc in the Evening.

    I took my medication and insulin then I rang the hospital to confirm they had a bed. I arrived at hospital at 9-35 am and was shown to a waiting room. My Wife and I sat there for four and a half hours. I began to feel the effects of a hypo and my Wife called a Nurse, we explained what was happening and that I needed sustenance and she set off to get me something to eat. We sat there for a further 15 Min's by this time my sugar was down to 2.6 and I was starting on a full Hypo. A nurse arrived and saw I was in some distress and finally took me in to the Ward, but nothing was done to help me. By this time my Wife was frantic as my sugar had dropped down to 1.8 and she administered an injection of Glucagen, which she carried in her bag. Soon the Ward Doctor arrived and I was placed on a Diabetic Pump. During the night, the pump malfunctioned and gave me a larger dose of insulin, this sent me into another hypo and Filipino Nurses were absolutely clueless, one attempted to set me up on a drip and broke the needle in my hand, while another was about to inject me with insulin, then another could not make out what glucogen was when I asked for it. Finally I was again linked up to another pump and things stabilised. That was at 3-30 am and I was taken to surgery, despite the two Hypo incidents. When I arrived, still attached to the pump, which was constantly beeping, the Surgeon refused to operate until it was removed. There was as a stand off for over 4 hours, until finally the pup was disconnected and I was given anesthetic in my back. I remained awake during the whole procedure. Before I left that ward I had another hypo and I discovered my insulin was left outside the fridge during the week I was in that hospital.

    I did complain to the Health Care Commissioner, but that is another story.
     
  3. ebony321

    ebony321 · Well-Known Member

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    When i was diagnosed i was sent stright to hospital with sugar over 24. they put my on fluids (as i was dehydrated from symptoms) and a sliding scale of insulin. i was left for my sugar to go so low i couldnt get out of bed. then a nurse came and took my sugar, and ran straight off to get a glucose drip. i wasnt explained what was happening and didnt even know what a hypo was. i'd been diagnosed about 3 hours before. i was then left from 4-11pm without any insulin, i was then hospitalized 5 months later with high sugar and ketones again. i was again put on a fluid drip and insulin sliding scale. i was left to go low again. but this time i had my own meter and insulin and glucose tablets. my sugar went down to 2.3 while i was asleep. having a hypo woke me up and i treated it myself. buzzed a nurse. who came hours later.
     
  4. chewy08

    chewy08 · Newbie

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    Hi

    I use two types of insulin, one of them humalog - for fast acting insulin, and a longer acting one which is lanctus.

    I normally inject 4 units of humalog and 40 of lanctus in the morning.

    One morning feeling very tired, i manged to mix up my injections, and injected 40 units of fast acting insulin.

    I panicked, phoned my gf and race round to hers in my car (bad idea i know). She phoned for an ambulance and i spoke to a lady on the nhs direct line for aslong as i could before passing out.

    On arrival the paramedic who was cleary having a bad day told my gf i should have driven to the hospital instead of wasting their time, calling them out.

    I thought that was lovely but it didnt end there. Once arriving in a&e i was shoved in a bed, and wacked on a gluecose drip, this was fine, only it ran out, luckily my gf was around to see my vitals significally drop to realise something wasnt right, and turn to see me passed out again and so called a nurse to help me.

    i was shoved on another gluecose drip which was replaced a couple of times in the following 8 or so hours, whcih was fine, until my body used up all the humalog and now the gluecose was having its effect with my levels continually going up, the nurses refused to let me inject again, and instead offerd me toast. My levels continued to rise until i took it upon myself to tell them i was going home in order to take control of my own sugar levels as they didnt seem to have a clue.

    Yes i know it was a silly mistake to inject the wrong amount, but if it wasnt for my gf at the time and me releasing myself from hospital things could have been a whole lot worse!!
     
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