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Help? :(

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by joshg123, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. joshg123

    joshg123 · Member

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    Okay this is going to sound really pathetic because I am a 17 year-old college student who is really struggling with diabetes, I mean Ive got better recently, i.e I am telling my friends I have an insulin pump. But I dont know what it is, I just cant find the motivation to do any of the care, so I just eat like a normal person and shove a random load of insulin in and thats rare in itself, I barely test my bloods at all because I usually can't be bothered, and my doctor said if I dont sort it out by my next appointment (march 27th) he'll take my pump away and then everything will just get worse again. I just dont know what to do. I just feel guilty every time I hear my pump and I feel depressed every time my mother asks me what my bgs are, and I just lie to her. I just dont know what to do anymore. I know it all sounds so melodramatic, I mean I have a pump and people would kill to have a pump and Im just awful at everything diabetes :shock: sorry guys,
     
  2. SamJB

    SamJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You obviously know you need to sort it out and asking on here is the first step, so well done. You probably also know that you are heading for blindness, stroke, heart disease, limb amputation, kidney problems if you don't sort it out. Use that as motivation, I do. Take steps today to sort it out, it will take a few weeks, but you can say today was the day when you started to control your diabetes.

    First things first, get into a routine by eating the same quantity of carbs for breakfast, lunch and dinner from day to day. Eat at the same times too. You might even want to eat exactly the same food until you figure things out. Write down your sugar levels for before meals and 2 hours after. That way, you should be able to spot any patterns and adjust your insulin accordingly.

    I can't help with a pump sorry as I'm on injections, but I'm sure someone will be along soon who does use one.

    Post your before and after meal readings on here and people can help. Good luck, you can do it!
     
  3. curly_caz5

    curly_caz5 · Member

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    Hey, am 22 and just getting my self together with my injections and bloods, i never took any bg and i just gave myself insulin when i wanted i have had it since i was 11,
    Dont feel alone i found it dead hard at college and school, i am now working and i feel a little more in control,
    I dont do this carb count am a little confused about that myself, but i eat what i want when i want, :) and doing well keeping my bg down,
    I dont know if ave helped but if u want any advice or that feel free to talk, :)

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  4. joshg123

    joshg123 · Member

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    Thank you guys, I know im heading towards that and it just doesnt motivate me, I mean I try, get motivated but it only lasts like 2 weeks, all my doese are right too because as soon as I start checking my bg they go right down to below 9 for ages until I lose the motivation again! I just dont know how to keep it up, im awful with routines, and then the fact im a full-time smoker as well pretty much seals the deal of amputaions. its so fustrating!
     
  5. Paulasensio

    Paulasensio · Member

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    I really really don't mean to patronise. I feel lucky I was diagnosed at 31 with a wife and kids - with not only the motivation to keep healthy and to be around for my children but also more awareness of how quick and delicate life is. Here is the patronising bit... sorry... but at 17 you feel invincible. It doesn't take long before you heap on damage when you don't look after yourself (couple of years tops?) and not only do you not want to do that but you want to slow that inevitable damage (your next 60 years is a good bit of time) right down so that you can even repair damage wherever possible. Yes you can have organ trouble, loss of limbs, blindness etc but within a few years of where you are now erectile disfunction. It's often the first thing to go and not funny in your early twent
    At my last hospital check-up my consultant was late because she had been dealing with a 24 year old woman who had used her diabetes to lose weight in her late teenage years. She was nearly blind, had a failing heart and was being given a year or two tops. We all know we have been dealt a pretty rough hand but unless you take control of it and control it every day with both desperate hands you will suffer - and not when you're old and broken anyway. I'm glad you are aware of what smoking does too - every fag you have imagine the same damage happening at an even faster rate - say double the time. I say that as a former smoker who was forced to give up when I was diagnosed. I know you know this but take it to the next level and FEAR it - be afraid - sorry but it is the only way.



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  6. Bombshell13

    Bombshell13 · Active Member

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    I think you have done really well to come on here and admit how you feel and maybe that's the first step in getting on track. I was 16 when diagnosed and had many ups and downs. I think the teenage years are the hardest of all! I'm 31 now and believe me it does get easier the older you get. Maybe try talking properly to someone close to you and explain how it's getting to you. Don't forget your not alone xxxxxx


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  7. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

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    thats got to be tough :( i know at your age i would have been exactly the same as you i didnt give a monkeys, i wish i could convey how differently you will one day feel about everything, and how precious life becomes, i am sitting here trying to think of something inspirational to say that may have worked for me (althought the erectile thing may have worked sheesh) but i cant so im just going to go for pleeeeeeease look after yourself, no one else can do it for you, good luck!
     
  8. joshg123

    joshg123 · Member

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    Hmm I know all of these problems will come,but Id never use it too loose weight (thankfully) but I do try and no worries I dont feel patronised, just from posting on this forum though ive started caring more and i've done my bgs today twice, which is alot for me, they were 6.5 this morning and now they're 11, im just hoping 3 years of bad care wont do too much damage:/ I know it most likely already has but im hoping to change that. and I know im not answering you all individually but I just want you all to know that you have all really helped, I just hope I can keep this up this time,. :(
     
  9. Paulasensio

    Paulasensio · Member

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    It's never too late! With scores like that today you're well on your way. A consultant diabetes specialist told me with good care you can even claw back some damage so it is well worth getting back on your saddle as soon as you can after a fall.

    We all drop our guard from time to time and we all make mistakes. Unlike so many you are on here and posting which means you care - not just about others but yourself. You have to be selfish and think about yourself as a diabetic or there will be little if you to go around.

    I was diagnosed type 2 initially and went 1 1/2 years being given the wrong treatment. I didn't go through the traditional hospital emergency but rather went through what they call a 'honeymoon period'. 5 years on and with tight control I have some slight background retinopathy. I can live with that.

    Good luck with the struggle and quit those fags ;)
     
  10. joshg123

    joshg123 · Member

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    I hope, un-doing some damage would be great! and yes, I know you have to be selfish, But im never selfish so I struggle! and oh my thats awful! sorry to hear that, you must of been very ill? and I really want to quit smoking But I love it too much, and will power is a b***h :| thank you so much though!
     
  11. Finzi

    Finzi · Well-Known Member

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    Josh - I'm not Type 1 so can't help out with the practical sides of things like dosing, but I just wanted to say that you mustn't think that it's too late because you've not shone at diabetes control for three yeas. Anything at all you can do to improve things from now on is worthwhile. Three years isn't really that long in the lifetime of a diabetic. And I think from reading stories on here that poor control in your teenage years is really really common. My son is 17 - he'd be an absolutely rubbish diabetic, I know he would! Same with the smoking - even if you can't give up, try to cut down a little bit, because every little bit helps.



    Type 2 on Metformin, diagnosed Jan 2013, ultra low carber, Hba1C at diagnosis 8% (64), average BS now between 5 and 6 mmol.
     
  12. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    Ok as others have said visualise this, at 40 looking back and seeing how you are now and having the chance to change things now ? You haven't been singled out, this is just the cards you have been dealt, start to think differently and take control, you are not alone but you have the chance of a healthy life if you can start to manage your bs. Also who cares what your mates think - true mates will care about you and want you to be healthy. You sound pretty switched on so start pushing you doctors to get on courses for better management and DAFNE,do yourself a favour and start taking better care of yourself, good luck.
     
  13. Slesser1

    Slesser1 · Member

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    Good on you for admitting your lack in caring for your diabetes. Dont be too hard on yourself tho, cos youve asked for help, so you must be ready. I hope you keep it up sorting yourself out, but if you find yourself slipping back into old habits, come back and ask for some support and incentives. Just one more thing that might or might not apply to you. For a long time, I was like you, and nothing could make me care. My doctor told me that because my diabetes wasnt under control, I was suffering depression, which is why I didnt feel worth caring about. Short dose of anti depressants helped. Good luck x

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  14. cbd5

    cbd5 · Newbie

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    I'm type one, around your age and also on a pump. Have you been taught how to carbohydrate count? It is essential! Also, have a look at blood meters. Find one that is going to make you test. I have a Contour Link meter, which automatically tells my pump what my blood glucose is, allowing me to correct for this. Which pump do you have? I also have a accuchek meter, where the strips are inside the meter and the pricker is attached, it's good for when I go out so I don't have to carry loads. Most of all, you need to look up type one diabetes and the complications. Spend an hour staring at the amputated feet, the gangrene and the kidney failure. Diabetes is a killer :( I'm lucky that I've had amazing support and got it when I was young, so easily formed habits of blood checking. Feel free to email me if you need any help, any advise, or just need someone to talk to about diabetes and life.
     
  15. QuirkyBit

    QuirkyBit Type 1 · Member

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    I remember feeling the same at your age. I'm 26 now and only in the last few years have I really actively started working towards getting the best BG levels and HBA1c. It's hard because you don't have a routine at that age and there can be a lot of peer pressure from friends to be "normal". As soon as you start getting good results something in your routine changes and messes it up again.

    You mentioned that you feel down and get depressed about it. Is this something you have mentioned to your doctor? I have felt depressed about it for a while on and off. Your doctor should not just dismiss it as their is a known link with diabetes. Ultimately feeling better about yourself and being able to handle your condition psychologically will give you better control of your diabetes.

    Also, smoking probably isn't doing you any favours with your doctor (or your health, but thats obvious). They might be more receptive to you if you kick the habit.
     
  16. czj

    czj Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi joshg123. Sorry to hear that you are having a hard time. I am replying as your experience reminds me of my teenage years. Everything resolved itself for me, and I am sure it will for you.

    I was diagnosed at the age of 11, back in 1969. The technology was very different, so it was a glass syringe I faced rather than the pump. First year was fine, though the mechanics of the syringe, needles and multiple insulins was a bit of a hassle. But then, from about the age of 12 to 17 I had a needle phobia. I’d sit there for half an hour, trying to inject. By the time I could bring myself to do it, the insulin, which by now had settled out, would more likely explode over than me than be injected.

    I was rushed to hospital 4 times with high blood sugars. No doctor ever asked me a thing about what was going on. I loved listening to them speculate - favourite theory was that my hormones were disrupted due to puberty. That experience gave me a healthy scepticism of Doctors’ opinions.

    I was terribly depressed during these years. Then I left home and went to university, and my behaviour changed overnight. The phobia became a real hindrance in my life, and I just had to ditch it. But even now I avoid the pen (unwieldy, intimidating object) and stick with the dinkiest of syringes.

    I bet one day your life will have a big change and not managing your diabetes will suddenly become a liability. Maybe a new job or a new relationship, whatever, but something will trigger a change in you, and with no trouble, you’ll just start to control your diabetes.

    Other than that, I’d suggest you ditch the pump. It doesn’t seem to suit you, and losing it is unlikely to “make everything worse as your doctor claims. (Better still, ditch the Doctor, who recognises it doesn’t suit you but is sticking to his “pull your socks up” script.)

    Good luck for the appointment on the 27th.
     
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