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Hi all, new to this diabetes club

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Allanmax, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. Allanmax

    Allanmax Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi my name is Allan, I was diagnosed type 2 couple of weeks ago. At present I'm getting the letters and appointments through for all the information and help that luckily is available through the NHS. Wow very impressed. Still finding the reality of looking at the back of foodstuffs in the supermarket for the good and bad bits all very confusing, but I'll get there in the end. Still a bit shell shocked tbh. Anyway I'm sure Reading everything on this forum is going to help guide me through. In the meantime I'll sit back and read everything I can to help myself. Anyway just a quick hi from me.
     
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  2. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Hi and welcome to the club,

    You seem to have the right attitude to beat this disease into remission.

    Tagging @daisy1 for her informative introductory post.

    Good luck on your journey - and don't forget to ask a lot of questions.
     
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  3. Allanmax

    Allanmax Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi and thanks. When I was diagnosed, at aged 59. from that day just over two weeks ago I've cut out everything that I thought I was doing wrong. No chocolate (my biggest failing). Sugar in tea and coffee, crisps and sugary snacks. I've been vegetarian for over thirty years so the jump isn't really that big. I'm going to miss the fruit quantity more then anything I think. Oh well its a kick up the back side I needed to get healthier so I'm going to take it with both hand's. I'm also looking to get a little slimmer too which is always nice. Get back into my jeans that are lounging in the back of my wardrobe. My biggest help has been my wife, she's been a rock when I've been down. It's been more of a shock to think I'm not immortal after all. Lol. I'm still finding it hard because I thought my lifestyle was pretty good with not eating meat, lots of salad with quorn, not drinking hardly, maybe 4-5 units a week, (down to 0 now and don't miss it) never smoked, and thought I did enough through walking the dogs. Obviously not. On the plus I've lost weight already. Down from 96kilos six weeks ago to 91.7 at the last weigh in. At 5ft 8 need a little more. Had a cat scan and the results came back all clear so it must be the sugary stuff that wasn't helping. This forum is going to help enormously.
     
  4. Sam50

    Sam50 Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    hi @Allanmax and welcome to the forum, I am sure that you will find it an invaluable source of support and advice.

    I would strongly advise that you buy yourself a blood glucose testing monitor so that you can test yourself before and after eating to see how different foods affect you. Lots on the market, my Hubby uses the Codefree one which you can buy on Amazon. Many people on here follow a Low Carb method of eating which helps many people gain control over their blood sugar.

    All carbs turn to sugar during digestion so you have to limit the bread, cereals, potato, rice, grains , starchy veggies as well as the obvious sugary foods. Lots you can eat though-suggest you take a look at www.dietdoctor.co.uk for suggestions.

    Good luck xx
     
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  5. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Hello and welcome to the forum.
     
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  6. Allanmax

    Allanmax Type 2 · Active Member

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    Thank you everybody. Lots of info is what's required by us newbe's and this forums been great already. Alot more than I got off my doctor. It was you have type 2 diabetes, take these tablets, stop eating rubbish and there's the door. Well thanks for that. Hello google. This is the best thing I've found. You have all been through how I'm feeling right now and the relief of finding a helping hand. Thanks.
     
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  7. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    Welcome to the forums @Allanmax ,

    As you have already discovered, there's a great bunch of helpful people here so I hope you can tap into their knowledge.

    Have a good read of the forums and also take a look at the information pages on the front end of the website, they are rammed with good stuff.

    Good luck.
     
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  8. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi, and welcome! You weren't eating rubbish, but all the sugar in the fruit you ate, probably ended up stored as fat. (Especially crowded onto your liver and pancreas). My husband and I used to eat the same, but I packed on 35 excess kilo's. He's still so skinny, that if you turn him sideways, he disappears. Basically, it's genetics. Fruit is generally healthy, what with the vitamins and all. Just not for people like us. (Berries seem to be okay though, in moderation..! Strawberries with cream...) If you're willing to switch one lifestyle for another, going low carb/high fat could make all the difference in the world. You obviously have the willpower for it. (Check dietdoctor.com for recipies. They have loads.) Be sure to get a meter so you're not flying blind, and keep reading here. Oh, and as for chocolate... If you get the really bitter stuff, and don't scarf it down all in one go, it's still on the menu. ;) (I usually have a walnut or coconut oil to go with it to take the edge off. Going to try keto cocoa/coco fat bombs soon!). Good luck!
     
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  9. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Allanmax

    Hello Allanmax and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  10. NewTD2

    NewTD2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hope this helps mate
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb
     
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  11. Mick1959

    Mick1959 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Allanmax

    Welcome to the club, you have been giving lots of good advice above, and in these early days, like any club, getting used to the rules is very confusing.

    But ask plenty of questions, even if you think you should know the answer, it is the way I am learning
     
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  12. Allanmax

    Allanmax Type 2 · Active Member

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    Wow this is great. A big thank you to everybody. I feel more empowered already. Quite looking forward to to reading all the links, as they say information is king.
     
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  13. jayney27

    jayney27 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome
    You have already discovered that we are a friendly group of people and as you said we have all been where you are, like you my diagnosis was a massive shock. That said I found this wonderful place and quickly switched to follow what seemed to be a proven way forward for many here, low carb high fat diet. It has worked for me, levels down to pre diabetic at my first check up and now 4 stone lighter, lots of energy and improved fitness, oh and I still enjoy chocolate, the very dark stuff and I think I’m an exception to the rule I actually like it.
    Good luck on your new journey.
     
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    #13 jayney27, Apr 19, 2018 at 7:12 PM
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
  14. PenguinMum

    PenguinMum Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi Allan. My thoughts are identical to Jayneys above. I am 4 months diagnosed and have got my first quarterly BG review down significantly. It is a great way to eat and If you test your blood before/2 hours after meals you will soon learn what doesnt suit you. It really can vary from person to person. Wishing you all the best.
     
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  15. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Master

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    Hi Allan, I think you have loads of info to be going on with, but just wanted to say welcome to the best corner of the internet for us Type 2s! :)
     
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  16. Tippy.tosca

    Tippy.tosca Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hello and welcome this is an amazing place I was so lucky to have found it while looking for advice the day I was diagnosed last November.
    I was so scared and in shock I guess at the time still am.
    There's some great people on here listen to them I did they won't steer you wrong.
    Good luck on your journey like me I daresay you will learn something new every day.
    Take care Julie
     
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