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How long does it take for a T1D to recover from an infection compared to those w/o T1D?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Tugba, Jul 29, 2020.

  1. Tugba

    Tugba · Active Member

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    Hello all,

    So last Thursday i was prescribed antibiotics due to an infection in my nose. I have completed the dose but am still getting blood sugars all over the place, fatigue, and a mild fever.

    I assume that even if the dose is finished that I haven’t actually recovered? And if so, should I contact my GP again for another dose?

    Thank you.
     
  2. MarkMunday

    MarkMunday Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Having T1 shouldn't slow recovery. Blood glucose control becomes difficult mostly because the immune system gets going, and that can continue after symptoms go away. But if there are still symptoms, you may want to discuss them with your doctor.
     
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  3. Marie 2

    Marie 2 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Infections like sinus infections can be stubborn. T1 or not. If you have poor glucose control infections can also be more stubborn. The first sign I ever have an infection is my blood sugar is higher but it usually drops pretty quickly once I start taking antibiotics, in my case it was a couple of tooth infections.

    But contact the doctor, you might need to be on them longer or switched to a different one.
     
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  4. In Response

    In Response · Well-Known Member

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    HI @Tugba
    I was diagnosed with T1 in my 30s (more than 10 years ago) and have not experienced any more illness or any illness lingering longer that it did before diabetes.
    The only difference is raised blood sugars.
    Unfortunately, raised blood sugars exaggerate any sniffs, aches, coughs, annoyances and any sniffs, aches, coughs and annoyances can raise blood sugars. This makes it doubly important to correct blood sugars when they get high during illness. And test way more than usual.

    If you are still unwell after your dose of antibiotic is over, I would suggest contacting your doctor again.
    It may just be a nasty infection - diabetes is not always the cause of illness and doesn't necessarily prolong it.
     
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  5. Tugba

    Tugba · Active Member

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    Thank you all for the responses above. I’ve always been told that diabetics recover slower from infections ‍♀️ i feel quite fatigued so might give it until Monday before I contact the dr again.

    High blood sugars were the sign i first noticed as well! Not often that my sugars are that high.
     
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