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How many eggs can you eat?

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by chl0ejasmine, May 17, 2015.

  1. chl0ejasmine

    chl0ejasmine Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all

    I have type 1 diabetes and have recently been having omelettes for breakfast made with 2 eggs and filled with either cheese or bacon for example. Is it ok to be eating this many eggs?

    My body seems to be only able to tolerant porridge or granola on some days - sometimes my levels will be 8 or below having porridge or granola and other times higher and I don't like having that inconsistency.

    Thanks!
     
  2. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Constipation?
     
  3. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    I typically have a breakfast that contains at least three eggs. The most I've eaten in one sitting is six. The only thing you need to be aware of is that the body has a reaction to protein that requires you to dose insulin for it. Typically this requires a dose of 50% of your normal insulin carb ratio for the weight of protein, and then you are likely to need to do additional boluses a couple of hours later and then a couple of hours after that due to the way the body processes protein to create glucose.

    I'm not aware of any reason why you can't or shouldn't eat eggs as a T1 and as a T1 I can and do.
     
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  4. Ian DP

    Ian DP LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I have been having two eggs per day (sometimes more) for over a year now. No problems. No constipation.
    If I remember correctly, DR Trudi Deakin (Eat Fat book - NHS X-Pert Health) said she has three eggs per day.
     
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  5. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In one go i often eat 3 or 4 and I'm fine!
     
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  6. Catsymoo

    Catsymoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Eggs are brilliant for you. In type 1 diabetes, eating eggs for breakfast can help you lose weight as you won't need as much insulin. High protein diets help type 1s stay a healthy weight because we don't need as big of a dose, since eggs are really filling and have no carbs. I would say don't eat as much cheese. One of my favourite meals is to heat up some coconut oil in a frying pan, and add frozen vegetables. Let them thaw and then had 3-4 eggs and some spices. Low carb and great for you. :)

    I'm trying to lose weight since my 30/70 insulin dose is slowly going up and I've gained 2 stone. Protein is also a really slow release sugar and will keep your sugar levels more stable than cereal. Think of protein as a super low GI food. Eggs are not unhealthy like the media portrays. Body builders and health freaks swear by them.
     
  7. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Be careful with this one, as your mileage may vary. Protein acts in a couple of ways and can cause quite sharp increases in blood glucose levels. Eggs on their own, (e.g. boiled) do this to me.

    The two processes are a glucagon reaction on eating protein, which causes an immediate increase in BG, and gluconeogenesis, which is where your liver converts excess protein to glucose and is a slower increase in BG levels.

    And to be clear, Protein is not "a really slow release sugar". Excess protein is converted to glucose by the liver via Gluconeogenesis.

    Both these processes are controlled in a non-diabetic by the hormones Insulin and Amylin, which are generated by the beta cells and diabetics lack.
     
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  8. Catsymoo

    Catsymoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I know it isn't, but in simple terms without the technicalities, it can be thought of as a slow release. I would say with type 2s, limit the protein a lot more. But OP is type 1 and on insulin, so eggs should not effect OP's blood sugar as much. If I'm on a high and have to eat, I always personally cook up some eggs because they don't cause spikes for me.

    It's all about experimenting, since different foods do different things to different diabetics.
     
  9. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    That's the important bit...
     
  10. msmi1970

    msmi1970 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Chloe,

    What about eggs are you concerned about? Anything in particular?
     
  11. DAC1

    DAC1 Type 1 · Member

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    I've been Type 1 for 43 years and have never had any problems with eggs in whatever form. In fact, because they don't have carbs they're a great way of filling that hunger gap between meals without having to worry about either carbs or additional insulin. I usually have a couple of boiled eggs for breakfast with a slice of wholemeal toast or 2-3 eggs scrambled on toast (ideally with a little smoked salmon). Some of my Type 1 friends tell me that eggs give them the 'runs' and I have heard other non diabetics say the same. But....we're all different aren't we? They're also supposed to be very good for you although I forget the exact nutritional reasons why.
     
  12. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    I count an egg as 4g of carbs. Tolerate them with my stomach but levels raise if nit give a bolus for them.

    Din't tolerate anything such as cereals, porridge, bread, pasta etc..
     
  13. chl0ejasmine

    chl0ejasmine Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all thank you for the replies - I have been having omelettes every morning and just wanted to know if it was damaging to do this.

    I have a huge fear of carbohydrates (I'm seeing an eating disorder specialist to help me) and I get scared the insulin won't bring my levels to a stable level since I've had bad experiences with porridge before. I bought some rye bread to try encourage me but I'm just so scared carbs will make me fat or make me high!
     
  14. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    The thing is... Can you live on omelettes for breakfast for the rest of your life??

    What happens if you went on holiday to an all inclusive hotel when omelettes weren't available? What would you do if you were taken in to hospital at sny point where omlettes may not be available?

    You need to be confident at eating anything and being able to adjust your levels of insulin...

    An eating disorder specialist will be able to help but you need to be able to see life as a whole lifestyle and not for the next few weeks or months etc. that isn't easy for anybody with an eating disorder.

    Eggs are recommended nowadays and many people eat them everyday but I think in your scenario with a lifetime ahead that you need help to overcome the fear of carbs.

    This may well be strange for a specialist to understand as a lot of persons with eating disorders have a fear of fat.. Because fat has been atated as the "devil" for years... So dealing with a person acoiding carbs may be more difficult for a specialist to comprehend.
     
  15. chl0ejasmine

    chl0ejasmine Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @donnellysdogs Thank you for your response - yes these are questions my parents and I have asked as I do struggle mentally with being able to eat carbs and will not go somewhere if the option is not there. I've been through many assessments to get to this specialist so hopefully they will understand. I just can't seem to mentally tackle eating carbs, and it's a double whammy when on a diabetes side, I'm scared my levels will go high if I eat carbs as this means insulin and this for me means weight gain.
     
  16. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    You do not have to eat massive carbs as a T1. There is no problem with having egg omlettes everyday providing your levels are reasonable.

    I eat very few carbs for a T1. Somewhere between 12-50 with milk in coffees on top.

    I am a size 8/10. T1 30+ tears and healthy. Carbs as in bread, pasta n rice crucify my stomach. So I tend to eat meat n veg or fish n salads. On odd occasions I will eat out the same as anybody else though... I just don't have tge rice, potaoes or other stuff that friends n family do.

    I ask about eating disorder as I have a young friend that has been in an eating disorder clinic for 6 months!!! And the food there was so heavily carb loaded. Her aversion was to fat... And although now discharged she does still have the aversion to fat.

    To me you need a balance of food.... Carbs from veg (in a salad) - there are still some.. Mine are about 9g per salad.

    I understand where you come from with carbs totally. I was advised to eat porridge and or toast for breakfast. I hate breakfast.. I tried and it really did nothing for me. It made my levels harder to balance...I have one meal, one pud, nuts, 2sq dark choc a day. I ensure I eat enough using myfitnesspal.

    I do make exceptions though....when I go to Waitrose with my hubby for a free coffee, occasionslly as I do have a yumyum. That is my husbands treat. So I join him. Its the only time and the only carby food my stomach can tolerate. If I go to Waitrose alone for a coffee then I don't yumyum.

    Carbs may not make your levels go high.. Not if you know and have confidence with your bolus insulin.

    Incidentally, and only because I care... Not for a lecture.. Do you test your bloods regularly?
    Were you scared by burses or GPs when diagnosed that tou would get complications? Just wondering why you worry so much about highs after food?
     
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  17. chl0ejasmine

    chl0ejasmine Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your detailed response I appreciate the advice and care. I do test regularly - a minimum of 4 times a day. I think I'm mainly scared because I don't want to have to give myself more insulin if I'm high because I think that will make me gain weight. I used to eat granola or porridge or bread every day for breakfast but the fear has just intensified, I can't really get my head round it myself.
     
  18. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    You've actually given me a huge chuckle!!!

    I was advised to eat toast or porridge for breakfast... Its the only time in my life when I put weight on!!! I never feel hungry though so have different reasons than you not to eat breakfast. At least you are eating eggs!!

    Seems like there is probably two issues here though... Giving more insulin as well as thoughts on weight gain?
    Do you associate insulin as actually causing weight gain or the extra food?

    What happens when your levels go low and you may need quick acting sweets or drink... Do you associate that with weight gain?

    Sorry for asking so many questions. I care, its not being nosey for nosey sake!!!
     
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  19. chl0ejasmine

    chl0ejasmine Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Haha it's okay I was worried no one would reply and try help or understand so it's nice someone has! I associate the insulin with causing weight gain - if I have a hypo I will have just 1 glucose tube as I can see the calories on it being very little, in the past I've just had coffee to bring it up because I didn't want to eat! But for the most part it's the insulin I associate with weight gain.
     
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  20. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    No, chuckle.. I can have some understanding of your thoughts. I can empathise with you as I have same feelings ish when I saw weight going on from porridge n toast!! I put it to carbs rather than insulin.

    Is it just breakfast or other meals you struggle with carbs with? Do you bolus for any meals?

    Sorry.. I feel like your mother or an interfering Aunty!!

    I care because I know I have seen the food and menu's that are given to anybody that goes in to eating disorder units and from the tortuous times my young friend has had. Also because I empathise with you as I know what its like to be told you should eat this or that... So I hope you don't feel that I am nagging you.
     
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