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I Don’t want a low carb Christmas

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by davd, Nov 22, 2020.

  1. davd

    davd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I know some people will say I can have a fairly low carb Christmas, but for just a few days I would love to be able to eat what I used to love eating at Christmas such as mince pies, Christmas cake, roast spuds, parsnips, chocolates, everything that I know I shouldn’t eat as a diabetic.
    I was diagnosed in April with an HbA1c of 90 but managed to get down to 40 in September.
    So for a few days if I high carb what long term damage would it cause if any .
    I sometimes go on a cruise , not for the foreseeable future due to covid, and that would be the same as a lot of eating is done on a cruise ship.
    So the question is can I spike my blood sugar levels for a week and then go back to low carb without causing any long term effects on my diabetic health .
    I think a lot of other diabetics would also like to know.
    I am a bit reluctant to relax my diet but if it is safe I would risk it.
     
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  2. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    I know it sounds like a cop out, but the answer has to be maybe, or maybe not.

    Theoretically, provided it's a day or two, you should be fine, except you might experience hangovers, just as you might with other forms of unusual over indulgence.

    Your question is one that's asked every year, without exception. Some manage to do exactly as they say they will. Some find they don't find their old eating style so enjoyable any more, and some find that a few spuds, or a piece of Christmas cake, or a few beers turns into several weeks and months of over-indulgence.

    Don't forget carbs can be addictive and for some, trying them out just reawakens their cravings.

    Only you know what sort of character you are, and whether you have the self-control and "off" switch required for your proposed course of action.
     
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  3. ianpspurs

    ianpspurs Type 2 · Master

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    The obvious answer is you can relax your LC any time and for any length of time you want. Leaving the reservation is never safe so I would be sure I left for a good reason and the quality of food was high enough to justify it. Some "swaps" just spoil a good meal, no substitute for roast King Edwards or proper Yorkshire pudding with top end beef. Christmas needs a carefully calculated wander away. Much of the sweet stuff isn't quality and could be drip fed and tested before and after. How far off the reservation and for how long is personal choice. The longer and farther you stray the harder it will be to return and the more damage you are likely to do. All my opinion and I know 4/5 of 5/8 of didly squat.
     
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    #3 ianpspurs, Nov 22, 2020 at 8:46 PM
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2020
  4. KennyA

    KennyA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion - maybe. Last Christmas I did have some Christmas pudding - never again. The huge sugar load made me feel really unwell. So while I might have a roast potato, and live with the short-term BG rise, I know I can't handle the sweet stuff at all, or eat many carbs.
     
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  5. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A couple of Christmases ago, after having had no sugar for years, I ate some fudge. An almost instantaneous feeling of euphoria flooded over me and actually brought a tear to my eye. Minutes later I felt ghastly and terribly sick. Since then I've just doubled down on extra steak and eggs. Sugar is poison in my mind, but we must all make our own choices.
     
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  6. Lilylala

    Lilylala · Well-Known Member

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    You could eat what you want but be aware of after effects of over indulgent
    from my self experience even a afternoon cake for myself can cause feeling sick , tied , a overwhelming feeling of not feeling not well

    So you can
    medicated to accommodate the extras
    every thing in moderation
    then back to realty
    back to your normal diet
     
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  7. Krystyna23040

    Krystyna23040 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    That is exactly what happened to me after a year of very strict low carb eating - except I didn't just feel terribly sick I was terribly sick. It was supposed to be a special treat on a very special occasion and I was so looking forward to having my previously favourite desert.

    It definitely put me off straying off low carb ever again. I suppose it was a form of aversion therapy
     
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  8. davd

    davd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Wow thanks everyone for replying ,
    I have only been diagnosed type 2 since April this year but with ignoring advice from nurse and taking advice from here I have cut carbs not Keto but to about 70 carbs a day and got level down .
    I am reluctant to give up my diet but temptation and still missing certain foods may cause me to reluctantly to eat what is about over the festive period.
    I didn’t think I had the will power to go low carb , been a smoker not able to give up after 50 years, but I have managed to low carb for 7 months and feel great loosing over 2 stones in weight and when my finger test goes above 6.5 I feel guilty.
    But back to my question it seems that a temporary lapse may not cause long term damage if it only temporary.
     
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  9. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    That's the key.. depends on what your food addictions were before going low carb.
    As @DCUKMod says above if you can do a couple of days then go back to how you eat now you will likely be fine but if you awaken the monsters within that you have managed to silence then you could be in trouble. I have seen many many people go for a "cheat meal " or a "cheat week" and then come back 3 or 6 months later saying why oh why did I do that.
    Only you know what your addictions were and how well you can control them. Maybe avoid the worst of them and indulge n a few "treats" or better still just carry on low carbing and forget the junk you used to eat?
     
  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    We have been going to our daughter's for Christmas Day, as our son in law is from the USA so they would otherwise be alone. I make the Yorkshire puddings to a slightly lower carb recipe I have developed, but I really do not want the potatoes, as there are so many other veges. They do not have Christmas pudding so as to make it possible to eat later (the turkey is lunch) so I make a low carb trifle, almond flour sponge, sugar free jelly, some berries, real custard, whipped cream, desiccated coconut.
    I have had four low carb Christmases now and really have not felt the slightest deprivation. I did check one year and my BG levels was well below 7mmol/l after lunch so I went ahead and had the 'high tea' option.
    I do suspect that many people could be served a low carb Christmas dinner and never even notice that anything is 'not a treat'.
     
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  11. loiphamp

    loiphamp Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    stay out of carbs,4 yrs low carbs now i can eat anything i like (ice cream,pasta,,pizza...etc)anything .i'm 60 yrs old now
     
  12. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This! I bought a deth by chocolate cake for my birthday, never again lol.
     
  13. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    It's your choice is the simple answer. But, for what it's worth, the thought of eating the higher carb and/or sweeter foods is always much more enjoyable than the reality for me. I love the immediate taste, I hate the after-effects. Pre-diabetes I would eat a Twix most days and really missed it when I went very low carb. It was the first thing I tried when I was put on insulin and had learned to carb count. I spat it out and had to get something else to cover the insulin. That's how dramatically my taste buds had changed.

    Whilst I eat more carbs now than I did when I was in my misdiagnosed T2 days, I prefer to eat what I enjoy now, and not worry about the diabetes side of life.

    I'm also someone who has long enjoyed a solitary Christmas, which makes my food a lot easier than within a group situation where I'm often deemed "fussy"!
     
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  14. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had this dilemma last year. I was really stressed about it. We changed Christmas from a roast to seafood- In Australia so summer. We had lobster with a cheese sauce- very low carb, salmon etc. Seafood is a real treat for me so I enjoyed it. For dessert we did something similar to @Resurgam with diet jelly custard and cream- so low carb I could eat all I wanted.

    If you go off I think you back to carbs it may be harder to go back on. There is a lot of low carb stuff- I stick to less than 20 grams a day so 70 feels like a big number to be able to get quite a few substitutions that will work.

    Ultimately your decision but for me the danger is seeing low carb as a diet not a way of life. For me this is my life. My next challenge is a work function at a dumpling house that is sort of compulsory - not really sure what I am going to do- nothing really low carb- sigh.

    Good luck and hope to see you here after Christmas
     
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  15. RFSMarch

    RFSMarch Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Since my last remaining parent passed away 3 years ago my cousins kindly invite me over even and we have what we lovingly call a “Mauritian” Christmas which tends to be snacks from the parents’ homeland and roast for dinner.
    I allow myself the indulgence of the snacks, a couple of roasty spuds and plenty of chicken and veg.

    I drive home that night and can spend Boxing Day back in my low carb hole.

    My cousins are both diabetic themselves so make some adaptations...
     
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  16. TeddyTottie

    TeddyTottie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Please don’t reluctantly eat anything! There is really no need to fall off the low carb wagon over xmas if you don’t want to - there are usually plenty of low-carb treats kicking around - lovely roast meat, luxury cold cuts, sausages, bacon, assorted cheeses, prawns, smoked salmon.... whisky (other spirits are available, I believe!), wine... Just assemble yourself a tasty mixed plateful. And you could always make something keto and sweet (I make a keto ‘fudge’ which is really a fat bomb - no cooking just a bit of melting in the microwave - and mostly cocoa butter, but yummy) to eat when everyone else is rolling out the Quality Street :yuck:.

    On the other hand, if you fancy a bit of indulgence and think you will enjoy and it won’t be a gateway drug to more carbs, then I suppose the odd day probably won’t hurt. But I don’t think there are any studies of long-term effects of occasional carb-fests!
     
  17. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Ah, Christmas.... I usually have a say in what gets served up, and not being British, mince pies and such aren't exactly the standard here anyway. It'll all be rather different this year, but it'll probably be all meat all the time these holidays. Venison, as a special treat, as well as salmon and steak. So I stick with lots of meat, fish, deviled eggs and whatnot, obviously. I love gingerbread spices so I've been putting those in my coffee. There are workarounds if you want them. And if you don't? Then you don't. It's YOUR choice. Just be aware that carbs are indeed addictive, and you might get cravings again you'd have to fight through into January, feel ill for a bit... I know if I spike, I'm knackered and confused, wobbly and whatnot, and I don't want to spend the holidays like that. But that might not happen to you at all...! You'd have to try it to find out. (Maybe on a day where it doesn't matter if you're knocked over by a feather, rather than the holidays themselves). We're all different, so that makes it a hard one to answer. If you have a backbone of steel and know you can keep it as a one-off... It's not going to give you diabetic neuropathy, kidney damage, blindness or retinopathy if you just have a few days off from being a diet-controlled diabetic. A lot of us relax our diet over the holidays, and then I also mean holidays in the sense of being on vacation somewhere... Though with a cruise's buffet I'd be all over the meat and fish and ignore the rest. Well, maybe steal a bite of my husband's chocolate cake dessert or something... It really is up to you.

    But like I said, if this is something you want to be doing semi-regularly, for cruises and celebrations... Check how you are with stuff like that first. Whether you have difficulty getting back on the wagon and whether you feel tired and ill if you fall of the wagon more than a little.

    And above all else... If you do drop off, make sure it's worth it. The meal'd better be a really, really fabulous one. ;) Don't waste it on bland crisps. ;)
     
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  18. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah, now this is a hard one isn't it because at Xmas you are probably thinking about all the things you (think) you are missing, the mince pies, the roast spuds and all the rest. My take is that this is only nostalgia kicking in and making you crave the normality of it all. I would say instead of going all in and losing control just think to yourself well you MAY indulge a little bit more in some areas, ie, you might have 1 roast spud but loads of turkey and a gazillion sausages in bacon to make up the rest, you may have a mince pie, but only one, followed by a 10 minute walk, etc. In between all that, just stick to what you normally have and maybe get some dark chocolate/low carb mince pies whilst accepting there is NO low carb alternative for a roast potato in my opinion. I find that way, you (possibly) won't feel deprived and when you know you COULD have something normally off limits, you probably won't go overboard. I realise of course that if you are the type that is likely to lose control (understandable with cravings and 'addiction) then in answer to your question, you may well feel ill after a sudden indulgence over 2/3 days but you will be able to get back on track as you did when you started off. Approach Xmas casually, don't worry too much, accept your carbs will rise (hopefully not too much) and get right back on the bandwagon asap. Some people think it's an all or nothing situation and I guess that depends on personality, but I suspect you will find that those items you crave are nowhere near as tasty now as you thought they'd be. x
     
  19. PenguinMum

    PenguinMum Type 2 · Expert

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    This will be my third diabetic Christmas. As long as I can stay well away from the Quality Street its fine. We have brunch of smoked salmon, prawns and crab and then a big roast dinner around 5pm. I allow myself one roast potato and a helping of bread and herby stuffing for one day only. So it works out a rare for me two meals a day. Drinking champagne between brunch and dinner really helps. I also think it helps to make a personal plan and stick to it. Btw you have done AMAZING to bring your levels down so much so quickly, be very proud.
     
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  20. davd

    davd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks I have been moderately low carbing about 70gms a day so not keto but in the last week I have been struggling to get it below 6 , my metformin has been cut from 1000 to 500 slow release a day , so I don’t know if that will be cause as I was getting low 5s a couple of weeks ago.
    I think I will do my best not to eat bad this Christmas just get a bigger Turkey to nibble.
     
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