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I never recongnize my hypos when I’m volunteering? Don’t known why?

Discussion in 'Jobs and Employment' started by Lulu9101112, Apr 26, 2021.

  1. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Most of the time outside of volunteering, i always recognise my hypos most of the time. However I’ve recently noticed I’ve been getting hypos before lunch break at my volunteering anywhere between 3.5-2.3, But weirdly I’ve never recognised the them, i volunteer at an animal park. So I dunno if I’m mistaking the symptoms for the weather or the work or if there’s another reason? Any ideas?. It’s hard to stop these hypos due to some jobs are harder then others and at an animal park you don’t always do the same jobs.

    Another thing is I get paranoid that my blood will get too low to to the point I won’t be able to sort it myself and even though the team is aware I’m diabetic, We have to keep our bags in the yards kitchen due to animals safety, we can’t carry anything on us or near the enclosures due to trip hazards and incase animals try to eat. (The only exception to this is keys to enclosures). I want to stop being paranoid about this but don’t know how to stop being paranoid.

    just wondering if any of you guys have had similar stuff like you don’t recognise hypos at work? Or that your not allowed to carry anything on you due to safety reasons. Any ideas what I could do about these things?
     
  2. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    You could carry enough hypo treatment to sort yourself out till you can get to your bag in a small sealed container?
    I was brought up with horses. Yep, they will sniff out anything loose in the pocket.
     
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  3. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    How far away are the yards from the kitchen? You really need some way to access sugar in a hurry.

    Would it be possible to have an extra snack before you go off to the enclosures if this is happening at a reasonably regular time?
     
  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Would you be allowed pants or a jacket with a pocket with a zipper to carry glucose and your meter?
    I think that would be very reasonable to ask, especially as there are no animals who will die from a stolen glucotab.

    I recognise feeling hypo's later when I'm very busy and active.
     
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  5. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Our yards kitchen, the distance really depends which animal your with, sometimes it takes 10-15 mins, other times 5 mins. Thing is the staff room (similar distance to the yard) also gets locked when the team aren’t on their breaks. We pretty much have a 30 min break at 10.15am and an hour lunch break around 12.30 thing is I have breakfast around. If I ate something ar 10am that would be too close to lunch as I leave 3 hours between lunch. If I don’t leave 3 hours between meals I end up going high and I don’t want that to happen either.

    Again it depends on the animal, meerkats wouldn’t care but ponies, donkeys, goats, squirrel monkeys, just a few of the animals there, would try to steal anything from your pockets


    Why would I carry in pants?. (Oops I forgot Americans call pants trousers, here in England pants mean something else) my trousers already have zip pockets. But it’s not just that they could die, some animals could choke if they were to steal and eat something or it would make them sick. (Yes it’s unlikely for them to die but it can still make animals choke or get sick)
     
  6. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    :hilarious::hilarious::hilarious:
    Yikes! Don't carry it in those pants! (Although I'm pretty sure even a squirrel monkey wouldn't be able to nick it from your knickers unnoticed :bag:)
    Being Dutch, it's hard to keep track of the differences in UK and US English, although I'm slowly getting better at it :)

    What about carrying your hypo treatment in a bag and just leave it outside the pen/cage you're currently working in? The worst thing that can happen is a stolen bag of jelly babies. A 15 minute walk really is too far for safety when you're having a hypo.
     
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  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Tell me about it.. But if they can't smell it or. You're not in the habit of offering animal treats out of your pocket.
    I don't know many evolved or dexterous enough to handle a zip.

    Yep you may get a little "roughed up" by a cheeky horse. Just firmly push back. ;)
     
  8. UK T1

    UK T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I'd agree with others and see if there was a system where you can leave something at the enclosure gate, so you're not actually taking it in with you, but also dont have a 5-10 min walk to access it. If you're 2.3 I wouldn't want to be walking 5 mins to be able to get hypo treatment. It could be something like glucose gels which are completely closed, so they're less likely to have a smell the animals get bothered by?

    Have you got access to a Libre? Sounds like this role is the ideal situation where you struggle to do finger prick tests and so would qualify for the sensors on prescription. You can then set a hypo alarm to go off a little higher when volunteering (I opt for around 5 if I'm going to be exercising so I can address/assess whether I need any glucose before my exercise is properly disrupted).

    How much warning do you get about your rota of enclosures? Can you spot a pattern of hypos with certain animals (or jobs) where you can preemptively snack before going there? I'd sooner be a bit high and correct after I'd finished that enclosure than hypo, but I hate hypos with a passion!
     
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  9. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Can you take less fast-acting insulin for breakfast so that your blood glucose does not go so low before lunchtime? If I'm active after a meal, I change my dose to accommodate this.
     
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  10. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    , I’m half Dutch, but I don’t remember them calling trousers pants. We’re not allowed to leave things outside due to health and safety reasons especially as a lot of visitors are young kids and they could trip over. Even with wheel barrows we have to leave them inside the enclosure not outside.

    ^ health and safety reasons anything left outside is trip hazard we can’t leave anything on the path. We also don’t have a rota, we know from a board in the yards kitchen which jobs need doing.


    I’ve tried that but it either ends up getting high or I still have the lows
     
  11. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My view is that no matter what the 'rules' are, the LAST thing they would want is the poster collapsing on the floor, unconscious, near any animals. The chaos of an ambulance being called and a 'situation' declared would be far more problematic than allowing @Lulu9101112 to carry her glucose tablets. Besides which (if in the UK) they have to make reasonable adjustments under the disability Act. It's not easy to make a fuss at work (volunteer or not) but it really is a question of seriously harming yourself if you are going hypo and nothing is being done about it or even harming others if you are in a position where you are not able to carry out your responsibilities because you are hypo. There seems to be a lot of 'I can't this because of that' going on but the fact is you HAVE to address it or the only alternative would be to leave the job, not an option you would wish I'm sure and any employer would have to explain why they were unable to accommodate you. x
     
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  12. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    I'd call it a 'broek'. Or in the case of pants, an 'onderbroek' :)

    And I agree with the others not carrying hypo treatment on you is an unacceptable safety hazard. Especially as you obviously can't even carry a phone to call for help.
    You need to have a talk at work and explain you need a safe way of carrying glucose and your meter on you at all times because not doing so may end in ambulances or whatnot.
    Personally, I'd phrase it you want to work it out together so not to endanger visitors or animals but also not risking your health or life. Have you thought about a sturdy utility belt or decent work trousers as a solution?
    You might find they'll be happy to accomodate you, they surely don't want their workers keeling over because they wouldn't allow one small life saving adjustment.
     
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  13. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    I don't want to scare you (much) but hypos are very very serious. Go low enough and you will become irrational and delusional before passing out. Not sure how well the animals in your enclosure will react to that. Also, repeated hypos will reduce your hypos awareness. The absolute last thing you want as a T1 is to lose hypo awareness. (Say goodbye to your driving license and your independence). You can possibly regain hypo awareness by aiming for a blood sugar between 6 and 12 for a few months, so consider how high your blood sugar will go if you snack at 10am or reduce insulin.

    T1 is often a compromise between living your life and having perfect bg. But hypos are incredibly dangerous and losing hypo awareness is one of the worst things that can happen to a T1. You need fast access to your glucose.

    Good luck. Time to talk to your colleagues, I think.
     
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  14. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    To add to the other great suggestions if you are in the UK and are eligible the libre 2 system would be helpful to put your mind at ease if you are anxious (can feel like a low) or just concentrating hard on the job. It beeps to alert you to a steep decline in your blood sugars.
    I am afraid you will need to carry a sealed tube of something sweet in a bum bag or that zipped pocket as worry about this seems to be on your mind. Or tolerate a higher bg after breakfast until the hard work you're doing brings it down into your preferred range.
    Sounds like a great job though and it would be a shame to let hypo fear ruin it.
     
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  15. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Going high is the better option than hypoing, managing your symptoms, and losing your hypo awareness. After your blood sugar spikes, does your blood sugar come down 5 hours afterwards? That's what the injected insulin curve follows. You have to ignore the spike if you are eating normally and your does is correct if your blood sugars return to your premeal levels 5 hours later. If you are still hypoing after reducing your breakfast insulin, you need to reduce it again. For me, I always half my fast-acting if I'm active afterwards which my consultant suggested. You need to find what works for you.
     
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    #15 ert, Apr 27, 2021 at 12:12 PM
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2021
  16. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Good point, anyway i've found a solution for now.


    i prefer just injection as i personally don't like anyrhing attached on my skin. Never have since i was a child and it is a great job. not realated to this post i love animals and I'm trying to get even more experience with animals on my CV because i want to eventually work as a zoo keeper. There's just nothing close to me my volunteering at an animal park is mostly volunteers/ charity profits with only a couple of staff members.

    i did have slightly more cereal for breakfast and did 7 units less than my normal carb ratio and that made my blood around 8.1 so that's good.


    since they got new animals in during lockdown i've also been noticing a pattern. So i've sorted the sitation, just carry it in my coat and trousers. The ponies don't care if there busy eating hay and neither do the other animals i work with. I could easily fit in my pocket. Like i do with my phone and the keys.
     
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