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I thought we weren't meant to walk barefoot outside?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Complications' started by kangoo, Apr 25, 2013.

  1. kangoo

    kangoo · Well-Known Member

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  2. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    I've never seen the pump, but I have heard about not going barefoot.However, since my blood glucose is always under good control, I think I'm not any more vulnerable than a non-diabetic, so I go barefoot whenever I feel like it
    Hana
     
  3. anna29

    anna29 Type 2 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

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    Hello kangoo .

    It is the marketing illusion of being 'safely' barefoot and fancyfree on this one huh?
    Looks far more attractive and appealing this way .

    Generally speaking the HCP's do advise diabetics with poorly controlled blood sugars not to go barefoot .
    As there is a real risk of being unable to feel things as well as other's .
    Grit, wood, glass has and can get embedded into the skin with the person being unaware .
    This obviously has the real risk of getting open wound leading to infection .
    Infection can turn quite nasty and risks of ulcerated areas become very real for the person concerned .

    I myself got a tiny bit of grit inbetween my toes and it caused an infection .
    Needing dressing every 2-4 weeks plus antibiotics .
    Wasnt nice as was unable to walk for the pain of it ! :thumbdown:

    Better to always be safe than sorry - our 'toots' carry us about ...
    Best to look after them the best we can :thumbup:

    Anna.
     
  4. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As well as the possibility of not being able to feel any cuts and grazes as Anna has said it is also a FACT that a very common symptom of diabetes is reduced blood flow to the extremities which can hinder healing of wounds which is why many diabetics suffer amputations after an injury has turned gangrenous.

    Of course these things can also occur with age so for a diabetic who is getting on in years it can be a double wammy which is why even well controlled diabetics like you and I Hana should still take precautions. Good control does not automatically mean that you have good blood flow to your feet although a good pulse in the feet may be a good sign.

    I see what you mean about that cover shot although to be fair you cant actually see if they are wearing flip flops perhaps! That said of course even flip flops are discouraged arent they :?
     
  5. flicc90

    flicc90 Type 1 · Member

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    When I was a child I had it drummed into my head that you always had to have something on your feet...which now has made me hate wearing shoes or socks or slipper don't like things on my feet.
    So I am practically always barefooted.

    I find as long as you just check your feet at least once or more times a week you will be fine.
    As well as getting them looked at by a professional every so often.
    Good control will always help.

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  6. Hooked

    Hooked · Guest

    I used to go about the house barefoot and wear vibram five fingers out walking. Then one day I dropped something heavy on my big toe. Loss of movement of the toe, a lot of pain, then loss of sensation, bleeding when I walked, loss of the toe nail..... being barefoot wasn't worth it.

    6 months on the nail is just over half way grown back and I am so glad the sensation has finally come back. I still cannot move it fully.
     
  7. lukkymik

    lukkymik Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have 95% good sensitivity in my feet but still get callouses on the soles. My back is shot so cutting toenails is difficult but was referred to our NHS Podiatary clinic who told me to book an appointment every 6-8 weeks and they do it all for me & any other diabetics who ask for it. Used to have to go privately but GP referred me. Try it!!!

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  8. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy · Well-Known Member

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    What you don't want to do os stand on a nail protruding from a floorboard and then spend 5 days in a field at a music festival... mmmmm green!

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  9. destiny0321

    destiny0321 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello i would not walk outside barefoot as last year july/august time i had an infected toe, then 2 or 3 at times got most healed then i ended up in december having a toe removed even though foot was not allowed on the floor all this time.
    forward to this year i knocked my toe antibiotics again that healed but now got toe ulcer on right big toe again antibiotics and no foot on the ground, things can change so quickly from good to bad, because your infection is aggrevating your sugars and the other way round. plus backwards & forewards to get dressings changed 3/4 times a week would rather keep feet covered.
     
  10. destiny0321

    destiny0321 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello i would not walk outside barefoot as last year july/august time i had an infected toe, then 2 or 3 at times got most healed then i ended up in december having a toe removed even though foot was not allowed on the floor all this time.
    forward to this year i knocked my toe antibiotics again that healed but now got toe ulcer on right big toe again antibiotics and no foot on the ground, things can change so quickly from good to bad, because your infection is aggrevating your sugars and the other way round. plus backwards & forewards to get dressings changed 3/4 times a week would rather keep feet covered.
     
  11. StephenM

    StephenM · Well-Known Member

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    I suspect that going barefoot is just about acceptable for young controlled Type I’s (providing the is zero chance of broken glass, dog poo, etc.). However for anybody out of their teens or Type II (often underlying damage is done before diagnosis) it is a definite NO NO!!! A friend with Type II went from a minor injury to a BKA (below knee amputation) incredibly rapidly. The speed the infection suddenly spread was truly frightening!
     
  12. renee

    renee · Member

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    Years ago I was told to walk Barefoot indoors. that was at the hospital. I have done it ever since. I might on odd occasions put a pair of soft socks on. I was told once to wear sandals outside. But that caused a problem . I got a tiny stone under my left big toe nail. It causes no end of problems with footwear now. As they won't remove the nail as I'm Diabetic. :crazy:
     
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