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I want to stop taking meds and replace with healthy diet

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by iammarycel, Jan 19, 2019.

  1. iammarycel

    iammarycel Type 2 · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes a few months after I had surgery for TAHBSO. It wasnt an easy acceptance. I didn't take the meds my doctor gave me. After a few months, I had a very high RBS test and I was forced to take my meds. However, months now and I still have uncontrolled diabetes and I am already seeing the bad effects of medication. It's only a few months after I did take my meds seriously and religiously.

    Now, I totally stopped taking meds and replaced it with a healthy diet. Mainly, veggies and avoiding foods that are on the no-no list for diabetics.

    Hopefully it does help.

    I started taking this morning, bitter melon w cavendish and carrots shake. And before dinner, I took ACV diluted in water. I hope I can as well log everything, along w my RBS readings.

    Hoping as well that this forum can help me.

    Thanks!
     
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  2. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just out of curiosity what do you consider a healthy diet? As the NHS advertised healthy diet is actually not very good for T2's at all.
     
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  3. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    ???????
    ????

    not heard of any of those acronyms.

    what meds are you currently on, or were you prescribed?
     
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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I believe it is a radical hysterectomy.
     
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  5. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    apple cider vinegar?
     
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  6. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @iammarycel welcome to the forum.
    I will tag @daisy1 for the standard introductory information.
    I have been on this forum for several years and often people post about additions to their diet that reduce their blood sugar. Bitter Melon, cinnamon, apple cider vinegar etc but I have never seen any really convincing testimony that they have much effect. On the other hand, reducing your carbohydrate input seems almost universally to work. looking around this forum and www.dietdoctor.com will give you a lot of information about low carb diets.
     
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  7. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Are you blending up carrots? That is not something most type twos would do. I can manage half a carrot roasted, but as part of a late afternoon or evening meal, not in the morning and not pulverized.
     
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  8. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    It is - I had one last year due to womb cancer.
     
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  9. zauberflote

    zauberflote Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    @iammarycel I am So sorry you had to go the abdominal route. I had two such surgeries (and the hysterectomy was the best thing after my hubby that ever happened to me) with their recoveries in my late 20’s and late 30’s. Recovering from that, with hormonal h-e-double hockey sticks wreaking havoc on you PLUS your T2D is hardly fair.
    I was given a cheat sheet by my doctor which, if I’d eaten to its guidelines, would have me being a full-blown T2 by now 5 months after. I am giving all the ideas and recipes here a try, and whaddya know, my BG started going down and hasn’t stopped yet.
    I hope you find the thing that works best for you, because being off meds is a great goal!
    Edit for clarity
     
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  10. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    In addition to what @Resurgam said about mushed up carrots, aren’t cavendishes a type of banana. Bananas are something that a lot of us wouldn’t touch as they are high carb and mushing them up makes the effect on your blood sugars even worse!
     
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  11. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    A cavendish is a banana?
    There's about 30 gm of carbs in a good size banana - combined with carrots that's probably my whole day's carbs in one go!!
    That is really not a good idea.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  12. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @iammarycel
    Hello and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful and interesting.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  13. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    the easiest way to get numbers down is to eat less than 100 grams of carbs in total daily... all carbs raise blood glucose even the ones that come along with high fibers...

    I find it easier if my breakfast is high protein and also almost without carbs..like avocado with hot salsa or shrimps, or cheese and ham (no bread) or bacon and eggs, chicken with roasted nuts and mayo and onions
     
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  14. iammarycel

    iammarycel Type 2 · Newbie

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    I had 3days of all greens, no rice and super less meat with a shot or two of diluted acv. i got readings on the range of 162-182mg/dl.
    Then I had this no food on the ref and pantry afternoon that we had to have fastfood for lunch and dinner. Had a spicy chicken wing and large fries for lunch and half cup rice and burger patty for dinner plus a banana. And I had a reading of 156mg/dl upon waking up the next day. The only difference was that that day, I had danced and sweated out that morning, and I took an afternoon walk for about 15mins.

    I am trying to see if it will work again, and will update you guys!

    P.S.
    No meds still.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  15. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think for most T2's the fries, rice and banana would raise their blood sugars fairly more than they are happy with, the only way to really tell how you are coping is to do a test before you eat and then 2 hours later (rather than just the next morning) and see what the results are.
     
  16. iammarycel

    iammarycel Type 2 · Newbie

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    m doing that right now. ate spag for dinner and had a 15min zumba. sweating here. will just have to wait 30 more mins for the test.
    hoping it gives a good number.
     
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