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im 15 and diabetic

Discussion in 'Children & Teens' started by barbiegirl, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. barbiegirl

    barbiegirl · Newbie

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    :crazy: im sick of everything being a fuss and a worry
    i cant go with my friends to have a pedicure because im diabetic , i can drink basically every drink known to man kind
    im sick of it all
    i wish i never got diagnosed with it
    there is no good thing aboout this just needles 24/7

    FED UP ! :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :problem: :problem: :problem: :problem: :( :( :x :***: :***: :***: :***:
     
  2. elainechi

    elainechi · Well-Known Member

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    life is **** most of the time with being 15 and T1...... why cant you have a pedicure??????? the reason they may cut your nails too short... you might not be able to feel your feet and not notice that your foot becomes infected..... yeah right!!!! whats yours bs like????? jane 13 years i would let her have one...she has normal ear piecing too. but if she wants her cartlige pierced ....i need to see hba1c in the 7s....only because it will take longer to heal......shes not keen on sticking needles into herself either or watching what she eats or me nagging her to test her blood......hmmmmm its sh'''t but have a hug anyway.x
     
  3. barbiegirl

    barbiegirl · Newbie

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    i just dont see the need for it to happen before i can even propley experience going our to clubs
    im not aloud to do much
    not aloud any piercing but getting my nose done anyway
    ive always wanted it done
    i really might aswell get 40 odd cats to save me later on when i move out
     
  4. elainechi

    elainechi · Well-Known Member

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    40 odd cats!!!!! own up whats your lasy hba1c????. if jane had her own money would i let her get her nose done..... probably but nag about after care....don.t want bits falling off...lol .. you probably are an expert on T1 but dont want to be bothered.... talk with your mum... be honest about things..is hard for mims to as we feel its all our fault. beware that pedicure piercing places will ask if you are diabetic..your repy is up to you x
     
  5. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello young lady, :)
    drinking at 15 isn't actually legal, not to sure about the age for going into clubs. There are plenty of soft drinks you can have now though, Sugar free will save you gaining weight and help save your gnashers for when older. Now I call that an advantage.
    There is also nothing that you can not eat as long as you cover your food with insulin. (I'm assuming you are on MDI)
    Buuuuuut there is nothing to stop you drinking in moderation when you are old enough to do so.
    Who said you couldn't have a pedicure? :crazy:
    Having your nose pierced is not good and looks dreadful. I have seen bulls and boars with rings in their noses. Nose piercings in humans leaves you open to the chance of a serious infection and even death due to the bacteria in your snot [​IMG]

    Why arn't you allowed to do much?
    If you control your diabetes there is no reason not to live a normal active life. I did all through my childhood and adulthood.
    Perhaps your parents can not trust you to care for yourself and act in a responsible way when out with friends?
    So prove you can and you will be fine.
    Teenage years with diabetes are the complete pits I agree, but you can help yourself by taking as much control of your diabetes as you can.

    40 cats [​IMG] I sure hope you have a good job with very good pay so you can feed them all and have a big enough house to keep them all. The vets bills would be expensive as well.
     
  6. Debloubed

    Debloubed Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lovely, I was your age once. I also had Type 1 too! (still have it, to be clear ;-) I have pedicures. and piercings. I do my own research, I talk to people other than Doctors and nurses and I read a lot to keep myself informed. My Mum was (and still is!) nervous about me trying anything new 'just in case' but the more I learned about Type 1 the more she let me do my own thing!

    Get yourself informed. I honestly believe you will view your Type 1 in a different light if you do! it's a pain at times, I won't lie to you but you don't have to miss out on things your friends are doing as long as you test and inject as and when you need to. Good friends won't mind waiting for 30 secs whilst you do that! Plus they might get to share youe jelly babies if you ever go low ;-)

    Chin up! xxxx
     
  7. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Barbie
    as a grandmother, I can assure you that your parents [and grandparents] are just concerned for you. They want you to live a healthy life and avoid complications such as blindness, kidney failure and amputations.
    If you learn as much as possible about your diabetes and control it tightly, you can have over half a century of good health.
    That's what we all want for our children and grandchildren.
    It is frustrating! I have been married for 41 years to a t1 diabetic, who has many complications. He's been ill now for about 6 weeks, on antibiotics with me delivering him to an average of 2 medical appointments each week. He has infected ulcers, kidney failure and has pretty much lost the sight of an eye.
    If he'd looked after himself better when he was young, he might well have avoided all this.
    If you get very down, try contacting Diabetes UK and asking about their services for young people. You might find it helpful
    Hana
     
  8. Paul J

    Paul J Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Barbie,
    Im sorry that you are where you are, and i really hope you come back and read your replies,

    I really can feel your anger , Ive been T1 for 2 years and although i am older than you, ( my youngest son is 15) and belive me its no better

    I went though emotional hell for 1 year, and put my family on the line , and even nearly walked out of my marriage after 27 years and 4 childern , I thought the rest of the world was s**t and had a problem, when really the fact was it was just me making adjustments to controlled BG and insulin,

    Its not a nice place that your in, but remember that there are many far worse off than us, my 27year old neices boyfriend of 7 years, sadly passed away 18months ago after getting lukemia, now that really is the pits,
    We only have to put up with this as its only really and inconveinience to life, just one more challenge being thown at us on our journey

    Please understand that we are all on this forum as we are all in the same boat, and we all want you to stay fit and well,
    But in order to do that you must take control of your own destiny,
    NEVER EVER take you eye off the ball , as it will only come and bite you when your not looking,
    Keep your BG in range, and test before and after meals, and before bed,
    If your not sure ASK, theres always someone to talk too, your not alone, although it can feel like that for a while
    Your mum is probably really scarred for you , go and give her a big hug,

    YOU HAVE THE ABILITY TO CONTROL IT, DONT LET IT CONTROL YOU ,

    If you follow the guide lines there isnt anything that you cant do with the necessary determination,
    Those who do live generally a long and healthy life, Many of those who dont end up with serious complications a few years down the line,
    i wont pretend that is easy but i wont be beaten ,
    I can still have a drink in moderation,
    I can still go out and party till 5 am , sometimes!!
    not sure about tats and peicings, not really my thing,
    But i do take part in some high adreanalin and dangerous sports, My doctor said that i am far more at risk from them than i will be from diabeties ,
    I hope you can gleen some help here ,

    Please stay healthy , and enjoy life, you have such a long way to go,
    I was talking to some one who was 81 years old not long ago,
    He was diagnosed T1 when he was 5,
    He is still up beat and living life to the full, although in his words, " old age is the real problem, my body just doesnt work the same as it did before, but I still have a scotch every day and go for a walk ,"
    His words gave me real encoragement,

    Take Care,

    Paul
     
  9. elainechi

    elainechi · Well-Known Member

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    all i can say i thought T1 was just a matter of carb counting and inject accordingly....no fuss

    NOW that my daughter is T1...after 2 our lives have been turned upside down...it affects us all and all about hormones...growth hormones..stress hormones...lady hormones as well as lack of insulin....im sure we all qualify for a degree in diabetes...if you haven.t lived it you.ve no idea... xx
     
  10. iHs

    iHs · Well-Known Member

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  11. scoots

    scoots Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi barbiegirl,

    I think it will have taken a lot to write your post, it's obviously pushing you to the edge. Do speak with someone, you don't have to go through it alone.

    Like Paul, I too was diagnosed as an adult (I was 35), however I have felt all of these same feelings. I thought my life as I knew it was over, I would never be able to do anything I had done before so what was the point? I was bloody angry (still am, sometimes, and it's been 4 years now), and no one could help.

    I agree with the other posters - the way out of how you are feeling may be to find out everything there is to know about T1, really get to grips with it and take control. You CAN control your diabetes, it doesn't have to control you. I have found now that I can do more or less anything that I want to - it may take a little more planning, but it certainly doesn't stop me. I thought for a long time that I couldn't drink alcohol as it affected my blood sugars too much, then I discovered I could drink as long as I kept dancing - result! :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

    It really is for you to try things out to find out how your diabetes affects you - everyone is different. And not to be scared that you're going to do yourself damage by trying things. You do need to be careful of infection though, which is often why they say to be careful with pedicures and piercings.

    The other thing I would recommend is the Diabetes UK holiday for young people. I was a volunteer a couple of years ago, and had a whale of a time. It was at Centre Parcs in Penrith (Cumbria) so a beautiful location with loads to do, and the great thing is that all of the young people (and the majority of volunteers) have T1 so it just becomes 'normal'. During the week it's all about trying things out - different activities, stress, alcohol, partying - to see how it affects you and give you the confidence to know you can survive and know how to treat whatever happens - high or low, it's all easily treatable when you know how! Many of the people who were on the holiday loved it so much they were going to come back as volunteers themselves, which is always a good sign...

    You can find out more about the holiday here:
    http://www.diabetes.org.uk/How_we_help/ ... s-Events-/

    There is only one a year for 16-18 year olds (see right at the bottom of the list), so it will be just right for you next year. The info's not yet been updated for next year, but you could bookmark it and pop back or send them a message and ask for them to let you know about it when it comes up.

    I now have an insulin pump and am loving it. Took me a while to come to the decision, as I didn't want to have diabetes so certainly didn't want to be reminded of it all the time, but I must say it is the best thing I ever did - much better control and it does away with all those injections! And somehow it reminds me less of having diabetes then having the injections - I use it publicly, just looks like any other gadget, and it's easily removed when you want to - as long as it's not off for too long at a time it's fine. It might be worth speaking with your nurse or doctor about it?

    I found this forum great - I could ask anything, and people were really open about things. And you can always PM if there's something you'd rather not ask publicly. Another forum/site I really like is juvenation (although I think they're changing their name soon); they have a new resource for you to start to educate others so you don't get as much pressure from people around you who automatically take on the role of 'diabetes police' (it generally is because they are just as worried as you are - we only get to hear the bad things!). The website is here, although you may need to register/log in to see it all:
    http://juvenation.org/resources/educati ... fault.aspx

    Anyway, you take care and be reassured that you are absolutely normal - it's them others. Beware the diabetes police, you take control...!!

    Jen x :D
     
  12. terry365

    terry365 Type 1 · Newbie

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    bg, you CAN properly experience going out to clubs - as long as you make sure you've tested your blood sugar beforehand to see that you're not going to collapse after dancing all night! It's a hassle but not a big one. I use the Accu-Chek Compact Plus blood testing meter because it's got 17 tests pre-loaded and it has a finger pricker attached (easy to use).

    You say you're not allowed to do much. I suspect this is because your family don't want anything bad to happen to you, so they're scared of letting you do things. Here's a way around that. Why don't YOU become an 'expert' on diabetes? It's easy, given the internet and all the information on it. All you have to do is read it. It takes a bit of time and effort but it's worth it. Then YOU can take control of your diabetes and your life. You'll have the knowledge to explain to your parents or anyone else why what YOU want to do is safe for you to do.

    For example, you can say ''I'm going out with my friends to a party but it's okay because I've tested my blood sugar and I've got glucose tablets in my pocket.''

    I became a diabetic at 15 too. I know exactly how you feel. It wasn't until much later I took control by doing what I've suggested you do. I could have done it at 15. I wish I had. So can you. Take control. Now.
     
  13. elainechi

    elainechi · Well-Known Member

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    my daughter is now 13.... a teenager....had a great party 70 other 13 s......got loads of money as gifts...spent £30 on having her nose pierced!!!! not quite i sure how i feel about it....it looks good but there .ll be trouble at school x
     
  14. monkeymutha

    monkeymutha Type 1 · Member

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    hey barbie gilr dont give up on it yet. it's hard right. how long you been diagnosed? is ure mum diabetic? u don't have to feel or be left out you stil got ure whole life ahead of you. be brave, be strong ok...it's good to talk. I was diagnosed at 13, boy though so didn't have pedicures ooh-aah.
     
  15. Gardenqueen

    Gardenqueen · Newbie

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    I'm a mum of a 15 year old t1 lad who was diagnosed age 5. For the past 10 years i have been on a mission to ensure my son can do whatever he wants, diabetes won't stop him. We just have to be more organised and prepared. He does drink and go to parties - he just needs to be honest with me so i can check his sugars through the night. He's been scuba diving, climbed snowden, white water rafted and camped out on expeditions. You can have a pedicure - your parents may just need to sign a disclaimer, you can have piercing, you know the risks, i won't allow my son a piercing because i don't like them not because he's diabetic. Do not allow diabetes to take over your life. Take control of it, look after yourself, monitor your sugars, treat any highs, with a bit of planning and organisation you can empower yourself to be a survivor. I have every confidence in you, by posting on this forum you have shown that you have researched diabetes and know where to get help. Well done for being honest and hang on in there, together with your family and paed diabetic team we'll get you through this xxx
     
  16. Archieparchie23

    Archieparchie23 · Newbie

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    Hi Barbiegirl
    I have a son who is 15 and was diagnosed with type 1 in may 12, he feels exactly the same as you, it's a horrible condition and a horrible age for having type 1, it will get better I promise :)
    I am also a beauty therapist with 8 years+ experience, as long as you are going to a suitably qualified therapist for treatments there is no problem at all for you to go ahead and have a pedicure. A beauty therapist who has done a proper college course ( not a one or two day course) will be trained in dealing with diabetic clients. All diabetic clients are well within their rights to ask to see qualifications before a treatment. Go and treat yourself :) Tracey x
     
  17. Nickers

    Nickers · Well-Known Member

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    Hi hun i was 12 when i was diagnosed type 1 i never drank with my mates at that age as i wasnt sure how it would affect me but i have and still go to clubs all the time it should never stop you living your life as you wish as long as you test before you go out eat properly etc i have belly button piercing and ears also have 3 tattoos,i have a son whos nearlly 4 aswell ive had loads different jobs so please dont get down about it you can live your life as a normal person i know you will think your lifes gonna be harder now but honestly it wont you can do it big hugs xxxxxxxxxx :D :D also i regularly have oedicures just inform them im diabetic so they know xxx
     
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