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I'm fine with injecting, but not with testing??

Discussion in 'Blood Glucose Monitoring' started by Alex_B, Oct 25, 2018.

  1. Alex_B

    Alex_B Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I struggle to test my blood sugars, I haven't checked them for a few months. (Don't lecture me). When I prick my fingers, it doesn't just hurt for a few minutes or an hour, it hurts for 2-3 days, which makes it harder for me to write. (I want to be a writer), writing is my escape from my mental health and diabetes. If I can't write then I start getting depressed and then forget about even injecting my insulin because it just takes over me.

    I've begged for a cgm, they won't let me, even though it's funded. They told me I could have one, they promised me in fact, then I get told it's just for pregnant people with diabetes? Why?

    They want me to test 8-9 times a day!! What should I do? I can't lose my writing as I'll just breakdown into depression and anxiety and it will just take over everything! I don't want to go back into that dark place, writing is the only thing I have ever been good at! What do I do?!?!
     
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  2. Jollymon

    Jollymon Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You could change to an ultra fine lancet. That helped me with testing.

    Cgm is neat. It works for some, but not for others. It did not work for me, so I would not say that you have to have it. I would wish that you could try it first.
     
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  3. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Alex_B, I agree with @Jollymon, use ultra fine lancets. Also I use my non-dominant (non-writing) hand for finger pricks but I appreciate that does not help overmuch when using a keyboard.
    Is using the Libre a possibility - funding wise? And whilst we know that BSL control is super-important in diabetics during their pregnancies, and thus justifies a preference for CGM use there, can your doctors push more for your cause?
    Why testing 8 to 9 times daily?
    Before I went on the insulin pump (which sorta dictates BSL testing as it is an ideal part often of bolus dose calculation) I would test say twice per day, say fasting and after lunch one day, the next day, after breakfast and before dinnertime so that over several days I had covered all the times. I admit to biasing the frequency of testing towards the 2 hours after the mealtimes as I figured these were the more important and relevant to my diabetes control.
    Ask the so and soes suggesting you test 8 to 9 times daily to do that to themselves for a week and then come back to you !!
    The non-penetration type BSL monitors are still in the future despite the hype in the press. But one can hope !!!
    Are there any reputable second hand sellers of the Libres? And can the sensor life be extended to obtain a better economic outcome without loss of accuracy?
     
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  4. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Expert

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    I may not be a practicing journalist, but I still type a lot... Where do you prick your finger? Right in the middle of the tip by any chance? Because that's where the most nerve endings are and that's the bit you type with. I always use the side of my finger, with less nerve endings, and it doesn't take a pounding when I write. Off to the side of my left indexfinger I actually have a little pad of callus due to testing, and it doesn't bother me at all when I write, it's so far off to the side. Just guessing here, but I know a prick in the middle of the tip would indeed bother me for days too. Just sounded recognisable. If you're already doing that then I'm sorry, I don't have any other answer than an ultra fine needle either...
     
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  5. Alison54321

    Alison54321 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Do you use a lancing device? apparently they are supposed to hurt less, but I wouldn't touch them, I just gently push the lancet into the side of my finger, it really doesn't hurt my fingers at all. I prefer having more control.

    According to this you are not alone in finding your fingers too sensitive, there are a lot of nerve ends in our finger tips, and maybe yours are particularly sensitive, this webpage gives information about alternate site testing. Apparently it's not quite as accurate, but it beats not testing at all.

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/blood-glucose/alternate-site-testing.html
     
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  6. Matteo1980

    Matteo1980 · Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunatelly there is not too much to add here that helps and I am really sorry for your issues. What about the depth of needle when you go to? For me for example 7mm was so painful,till i set it up to 5mm. Still really hate it and never gonna get used to it and neither insulin...but the pain is less,at least. Hope it helps to solve your issue...
     
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  7. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    Lancet devices used to come with an attachment which you could use when pricking somewhere apart from fingers (such as arm, I think).
    I have not seen these for a while but perhaps you could ask your diabetes team about these.

    In the meantime, could you start by testing once or twice a day?
    If you rotate around your fingers you will have a chance to give each one a rest and allow you to write.
     
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  8. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @Alex_B

    Can I check are you using the side of your fingers and not the pads ? Also rotate around the middle, ring and little fingers, don't use your index fingers or thumbs. Your lancet device can be adjusted to a low setting too.

    As you know testing is a priority, otherwise you won't know what's happening or even be able to correct a high reading, it shouldn't hurt if done correctly but getting regular tests will help you keep your blood glucose levels in range,, which as a writer will help you manage better mentally to be more creative with your writing.
     
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  9. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    Out of interest, what is wrong with using index fingers or thumbs?
    I have never heard this and use index fingers a quarter of the time with no problem.
    And I use thumbs as "backup" if my standard finger is out of action for some reason.
     
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  10. dancer

    dancer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Alex_B have you tried a different lancing device? My brother has always hated testing, as it was so painful. It turned out that no matter what number he turned the device to, it always used the maximum depth and was exceptionally painful. With a new lancing device he is fine, though understandably still hates testing.
     
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  11. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    I've always rotated around middle, ring and little fingers, personally I don't like using my thumb (skin is a little thicker) but there's nothing wrong with not doing your index or thumb but if you use these fingers alot then there's enough sites to rotate round on 6 fingers alone, as Alex has said she writes then it was to let her continue using them for writing without testing as well.

    WHO recommends just using the middle and ring fingers for blood glucose testing.
     
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  12. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Alex_B what lancet device are you using?
     
  13. logindetails

    logindetails Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ask your doctor for a Freestyle Libra - less need for pin prick tests.
    Test on another part of your anatomy - it does not have to be your finger tips no matter what anyone tells you.
     
  14. KenBachelor

    KenBachelor Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Since blood testing was first introduced, until I started using a Libre I've always taken samples from my forearms. I never fancied using my fingers.
     
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  15. Sugarmole_

    Sugarmole_ Type 2 · Newbie

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    If you use just 3 fingers and both sides of each you will have 12 sites to use in rotation. The index fingers and thumbs tend to be used for other, more delicate reasons (holding things and touch etc.) and could cause a bit more pain/issues if used for testing.
    I use a lancing device (Contour Next One) set to "1", 4-5 times a day. While I don't particularly like testing it is no more than a half a second of mild discomfort.
    If you continue having problems ask you diabetic nurse/doctor and they'll should sort it for you. After all they have probably heard the problem before and know alternatives that can work for you.
     
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  16. Emma04

    Emma04 Type 1 · Newbie

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  17. CathyWeeks

    CathyWeeks · Member

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    Hi,

    I work in IT so on the computer all day and most of the evening for personal use. I test 4 or 5 times a day with no issues. As mentioned above use the side of the fingers not the pads and should be OK.

    I used to use a lancet device which took blood from the back of my forearms which was brilliant but subsequently been put on a pump and was advised I need to use fingers so I cannot remember which device I used. It had two "tops" one for forearms and one for fingers so as also advised your DSN should be able to help.

    It seems you are type 1 so not testing is very dangerous not just re short term low blood sugar issues but long term damage re high blood sugars. Not a lecture just concern for your health.

    Please ask your DSN.
     
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  18. bilb_baggins

    bilb_baggins Type 1 · Member

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    I use Accu check mobile lancet device and find it quite good i test my bloods 8 to 10 times a day i have been using this device for about 10 years .
     
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  19. The Mouse

    The Mouse Type 1 · Member

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    You can definately still get lancing devices that can be used on alternative sites, also most devices are sufficiently adjustable not to need the "extra bit", Well worth talking to your team about this.
     
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  20. forpot2431

    forpot2431 Type 1 · Newbie

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