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In Reality Is A Diagnosis Of Pre-diabetes Any Different To A Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by gardengnome42, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I understand the significance of the HbA1c numbers and how 48 mmol/mol is the cut off for a full type 2 diagnosis but does pre diabetes [ HbA1c 43] mean I have to be careful of what I eat in exactly the same way that a diabetic has to?
     
  2. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would, in your shoes. Prevention is better than cure, especially as you now know you are on the slippery slope to full type 2 diabetes.
     
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  3. jwongcsp

    jwongcsp Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi gardengnome42 - So far it has worked for me. I've been pre-D for 13 years now eating low carb. It's not always easy but it can be done. It is easier for me to eliminate sweets than to try and control the amount. Recently we celebrated my wife's birthday with some close friends and family. At the finish of dinner they brought her a chocolate cake. Instead of eating cake I took my 2 year old grand daughter out for a short walk outside. She was getting restless and I wanted to get away. It served as a reminder to me why I sacrifice a piece of cake. I want to see her grow up and graduate from school some day.
     
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  4. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds wise to me. I'll tag @daisy1 for you so she'll post her very useful info-sheet.
    Love it that you're prepared to make changes this early, keep up the good work!
     
  5. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that's essentially what it means. Maybe a bit less strict.
     
  6. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I was diagnosed with T2 four and a half years ago,and a few months eating a reduced carbs diet cut my HbA1c results down to low prediabetic/top end of normal, and I've kept them there by eating a low carb diet without any problems, so I personally feel it's worth continuing to do so. - my eyes, hands & feet are essential parts of me that I don't want to risk losing! And as a bonus I'm also eating a better and more enjoyable diet now than I'd done for a number of years pre diagnosis!

    You may find that you don't actually need to eat seriously low carb, just keep them down enough to maintain your HbA1c levels..

    Robbity
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @gardengnome42

    Hello Gardengnome and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful and interesting. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  8. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you everyone for your replies. I feel sickened about it all really as I wonder where it is coming from. I know my age is against me [nearly 76 now] but I don't tick the rest of the risk factor boxes apart from hypertension, for which I take medication. Other than my grandmother nobody else has had diabetes. I feel I do eat well and certainly don't eat vast quantities of bread, pasta rice and the rest. I do enjoy potatoes occasionally, especially the ones I grow myself and also I do have a slice of toast with my eggs at breakfast. I know these are carbs but I don't go overboard with them and never eat rice or pasta as I don't wish to gain weight.

    Over 5 years ago I was diagnosed with hypertension and later found out the HbA1c test they did at that time was 41. I determined to lose weight to sort the BP issue and followed the 5:2 way of eating to start with until it really became a way of life. I'm still careful now but don't diet as such and actually weigh the same as I did when I was about 16! However I do enjoy fruit of all kinds and have discovered the pitfalls there. The carbs in fruit were an eye opener to me!

    Since that time the annual HbA1c test has risen to 43 and another in April was also 43. I feel to be on a slippery downhill slope and when I have the next one in September I'm terrified it will have risen again. I have my own glucose monitor and test before and 2 hours after a meal with varied results. I try and keep it to no more than 2 points between the 2 readings but don't always manage that. Fasting is nearly always in the high 6's and sometimes 7 [not good!] just occasionally in the 5's.

    I just feel sickened and in a state of denial about the whole issue.
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  9. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Don't despair, @gardengnome42 , you have managed very well, so far. Many people would envy that HbA1c of 43. If you want to improve on that some slight tweaking of the diet could help. How about reducing the fruit. Are you testing BG after eating fruit to see the effect? That could be an eye opener. Berries tend to have a lesser effect on blood glucose, so perhaps exchange for some of your other fruits? Of course you would only know how berries affect you personally by testing blood glucose after eating them.
     
  10. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    despite all the stuff on the media and from GPs, not everyone who becomes a Type 2 diabetic is either overweight, or eats a lot, or both. Sometimes its down to age, genetics, medication raising blood sugar levels, or other factors we have not yet got to grips with.

    and the majority of overweight, or those who eat a lot of carbs do not go on to develop type 2 diabetes either.

    Please dont feel bad about having it. Its just a condition which happens, often for no apparent reason at all.
     
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  11. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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  12. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Well this evening I had a meal of sweet peppers and a couple of new potatoes roasted in olive oil with a large grilled piece of lemon sole on the top [delicious!] followed by a large plate of raspberries with Greek yogurt and lo and behold the reading was 5.5 before and 5.1 afterwards. Amazing! Blackcurrants are ready to be picked soon and then we will be onto plums and apples. Those last two are packed with carbs and do make my BS soar. I do enjoy something sweet at the end of a meal though and fruit seems a better option than many other things.
     
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  13. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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  14. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Just not fair is it? I felt stigmatised when diagnosed with hypertension, more so because the HCA said "Well you are 70" as though I was ready to be shunted into an old folks home. I feel a diagnosis of diabetes would really be a stigma as though it was all my fault.
    You are very kind and I'm truly grateful LucyLocket
     
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  15. Smallbrit

    Smallbrit Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Big, big hug to you. I was diagnosed with prediabetes 5 years ago and yes, still have moments of thinking it’s not fair. I’m 41 and have been losing my hearing for 20 years and had a major struggle controlling carb intake last year causing HBA1C to skyrocket into the 70s/80s (I know what to do - it was just doing it!). I’m not overweight either and had the interesting horror recently of realizing that that just losing a couple of pounds has moved me into fitting clothes in the teenage section... (that may be my 12 year old’s horror too!)

    When my hearing loss started (early 20s) I was always asked by the audiologists if I’d gone to lots of loud music concerts or worked with loud machinery. I hadn’t. But wished I had so I had a reason. Diabetes and the question of diet? I wish I’d eaten more cake :)
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    #15 Smallbrit, Jul 10, 2018 at 11:45 PM
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
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