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Injecting in public

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Jimberlands, May 14, 2018.

  1. Diane fluteplayer

    Diane fluteplayer Type 1 · Active Member

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    Never had a problem though I wear separates and do my stomach where possible
     
  2. Diane fluteplayer

    Diane fluteplayer Type 1 · Active Member

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    I have had a local problem and don’t know how to deal with it. I’d got used to injecting in restaurants and most people who do notice are ok about it- some ask questions and that’s great. Recently, however, someone in a local branch of an organisation I belong to complained to the committee who asked me not to inject at the table. They said several people objected but I can’t talk to the complainers about it because they won’t tell me who they are. There is a lot of food related social events and even some meetings involve food. I am now avoiding most of these which reduces my social life considerably. I feel angry and excluded and I now feel anxious and uncomfortable about eating with other groups in the village as well. (Friends further away are supportive as are people I sing with in a nearby opera group). I know it’s only a few ignorant people but I can’t explain things if they just complain behind my back! I did tell a regional advisor who visited one meeting and she was sympathetic but I’m not sure what she can do without isolating me in the local community.
    Thanks for reading this far - it helps to get it off my chest.
     
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  3. SallyEzra

    SallyEzra Type 1 · Active Member

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    It has never crossed my mind whilst injecting. I have always done what I need to do. However from other diabetics I know that many do feel a bit bothered by someone looking on or feel the need for privacy - we are all different, which makes life more interesting!.
    I have used a pump now for a couple of years but recently the handset stopped working, so to take bolus during the day I had to either get the pump itself out, which is usually attached to my bra - not always the easiest thing to do with winter clothes layers on!- or just go back to taking it as an injection at the table in my tummy or arms. I often opted for the injection, just for ease. So stripping back as far as my bra at the table was clearly sometimes even a step too far for me!.
     
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  4. SallyEzra

    SallyEzra Type 1 · Active Member

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    Gosh Diane, I just read what you wrote about the local challenges you have had. It seems rather narrow minded of the committee to simply ask you to not inject at the table, as the complainers clearly wanted them to do. You would hope that people in a committee or anyone that has any influence across members of society would nowadays have much bigger picture thinking & ensure that the groups which they run are inclusive of as many people as possible.

    That mindset is so fundamentally against the way I think that I would probably just move myself out of these groups permanently, but I do appreciate in some smaller communities this may leave very few options (I grew up in a very small rural community).
     
  5. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    @Diane fluteplayer
    That is awful and pretty difficult to deal with.
    At the meetings, is there space away from the table? So could you pop into a hallway for a moment? I strongly believe that you should not have to, but understand that you may not want to be seen as 'difficult'.
    Huge hug. And I'm sending bad vibes to the complainers...
     
  6. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That's appalling, Diane! I'd try to open a line of communication on it. I'd ask the committee member to go back to the complainers and ask them to explain exactly why they object to it.

    Most people faced with trying to come up with a rational explanation for those sort objections simply can't, because there isn't one, apart from maybe a fear of needles.

    If it's explained to them rationally enough, a lot of people will just say, ok, sorry, didn't realise.

    If they're objecting just, "because, erm, er....", I'd try to steer the committee on to your side by saying, look, this is what I do to live, I'm bringing a small approved medical device with a practically invisible needle out, ruffling my clothes a bit, and it takes a few seconds. Why is that a problem? Would you expect an asthmatic to slope off elsewhere if they needed to use their inhaler? Is this committee going to take a line which would likely breach the Equality Act if it happened in other contexts? Is this committee going to make me change my approach to a life threatening condition, just because someone, for no apparent reason, doesn't like it?
     
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  7. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Diane fluteplayer . I would be only to happy to pay your good self and aforementioned organisation a visit.
    I would bring all my " stuff" and undertake a brief presentation on life with T1 diabetes. Included in my presentation, maybe an outline of complications due to poor management and an " inability " to administer our medication when and where required.
    I'd be prepared to do some on the spot injections to allay some of the perceived horrors of being someone who " injects".
    Ignorance can be balanced via education.
    Footnote..........I can come across as being a bit......ermmmmmmm..........
    Put it this way. When my sister set me up with her workmate many years ago she told my now wife " he looks like he's just came out of prison but he's alright when you get to know him" .
    Seriously though these people need pity and educating. Maybe a 5 minute chat after a meeting to help people understand may help.
    Good luck.
     
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  8. Bigsiqc

    Bigsiqc LADA · Newbie

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    I've just started on insulin. I don't have any problem injecting in my stomach in public but try and do it inconspicuously. However, on Thursday I was at a white tie dinner and had to inject through my white shirt. Of course I nicked a vein and to my horror a large red patch appeared so everyone could see! No one seemed to mind though.
     
  9. Tabzmcfc

    Tabzmcfc LADA · Active Member

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    I injected in my stomach at the Etihad stadium during a match and no one noticed. Also another time sitting next to my friend who is a diabetic specialist nurse. She asked how much I was going to inject for my meal and I said I’d already done it ha! she was somewhat surprised she hadn’t noticed. I do have some jeans with tears in the material which are useful.
     
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  10. AstraeaStar

    AstraeaStar Type 1 · Newbie

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    I have no problem injecting in public 'cos sometimes it's just a must, but on one occasion, when at a local resort in Scotland my syringe was pulled out of my hand and I was dragged to a police station and they had a doctor come and test me for blood sugar 'cos they didn't believe I was diabetic t1.
    The doctor gave them a right shouting down for endangering my life and I was let go with an apology.
    I guess it might have put me off doing it in public but to hell with them, if I need an injection I'll do it.
     
  11. jlarsson

    jlarsson Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As I was injecting outside by the river today I had another diabetic walk up to me and flashed his own what looked like a Lantus pen to me, can't remember anything like that happen to me before. Nobody else showed even a hint of noticing what I did, unless I just didn't see it.
     
  12. Buddy

    Buddy Type 1 · Member

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    I wear a lot of knit t-shirts and there has never been a problem. I would think twice about a thick fabric or closely knit fabric like denim.
     
  13. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Bike leathers don’t work either ;)
     
  14. Leeannea

    Leeannea LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. Have you thought of writing down what you’d like to say to the people who objected and getting someone from the committee to read it? Stand up to these people who may not realise the ramifications of their objections.
    Ps the “like” was due to a mistake.
     
  15. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I recall many years ago waiting with my pack and gear for a bus in the NZ town of Te Anau, on my way to do the Routburn walk over then to Queenstown. I sat on a bench bordering the street and injected my insulin. No-one batted an eyelid. Same on a train, bus etc. The biggest hassles are having a space which is clean enough, a place that is not moving too much, a dry place and enough light. Having said that I am mindful of not offending anyone. I do it discreetly. I have two family members who faint at the sight of needles and I do not wish to inflict this on others with the same condition.
    A friend told me of a UK doctor 60 + years old who would do a round of patients with his doctors and then go to the hospital cafeteria where this doctor would proceed to inject his insulin through one of his fine shirts. No-one thought to see whether he earned a thick ear from his wife for this injecting behaviour!
    The other point I would make is that I take great care with the storing away sharps afterwards. I do not wish anyone to suffer as needle stick injury from anything I have failed to do correctly.
    And now being on a pump the question becomes much less as one can time the change of cartridges etc to avoid most public situations.
     
  16. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Been doing injections through clothes for years--consultant told me off--asked him if he thought I should lift up my dress in a restaurant & have a jab......no answer was the stern reply....!!!!!!
     
  17. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The odd stain comes out with biological powder--failing that I spray it with stain remover....
     
  18. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Indeed--if anyone doesn't like it, it is their problem. My problem is simply to have to have the stuff.....
     
  19. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ....bit of a compliment really....you must look "normal"....police must think people with diabetes look unwell....
     
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