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Insulin Levels

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by rosemaree, Dec 12, 2020.

  1. rosemaree

    rosemaree Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I am interested to hear what fasting insulin vs fasting glucose level results you've had! I finally got a doctor to agree to test mine a year after diagnosis, my insulin level is on the lower end of normal but my fasting glucose is a bit high, so I'm guessing my insulin production isn't enough to keep my glucose levels within range.
    Also, for anyone who is in remission, how did your levels change/improve?
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Were the two levels taken at the same time?
    There is a formula for working out your HOMA insulin resistance that I'll try to did out for you but the results need to be contemporaneous.
    Well done on getting a doc to test your insulin.. are you in the UK or somewhere more enlightened?

    Edit to add.. its here
    https://www.mdcalc.com/homa-ir-homeostatic-model-assessment-insulin-resistance#pearls-pitfalls

    Or here with a bit more explanation
    https://www.omnicalculator.com/health/homa-ir#how-to-use-homa-ir-calculator
     
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  3. rosemaree

    rosemaree Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They
    They did take them at the same time. I saw these calculators, was trying to figure out how accurate the results really are. The omnicalculator is quite interesting!

    I am in South Africa, wouldn't necessarily call it enlightened :facepalm:
     
  4. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    Surely a low insulin production but high fasting glucose is more indicative of T1/LADA than T2?

    Has your doctor considered this possibility?
     
  5. rosemaree

    rosemaree Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have had quite a hard time with doctors, they haven't been willing to consider much.

    I was very overweight and many doctors couldn't see past that for any issue I had. I lost a lot of weight in the two years before I was diagnosed, the one doctor just told me type 2 in younger people is more aggressive. I initially responded very well to diet and meds, which makes me think it is type 2. I came off meds and have been battling to stick to diet, but sometimes my sugar levels are all over the place - one day they will be reasonable, and the next they will be quite high without changing much. I am trying to just get stricter on diet and may possibly start meds again, if that doesn't work I will definitely keep pushing for more tests. I wanted to get my insulin checked regularly so I can monitor and watch for any decline or improvement in functioning.

    Just curious what others levels were/are like, and how/if they change :)
     
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  6. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As you were recently diagnosed, your c-peptide should indicate above the normal range for type 2. Antibody tests would be the next step towards a diagnosis.
     
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  7. rosemaree

    rosemaree Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed over a year ago with hba1c test, I've just been asking for the c-peptide test the but the doctors kept blowing me off. Finally found one who agreed to send me for fasting insulin test - she said she preferred it to the c-peptide.

    Do you mean it should indicate that I have more insulin than normal? I thought that was how type 2 starts, but then when the functioning starts to wear out you become diabetic :wideyed:
     
  8. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Insulin resistance, which is a feature of type 2, results in the pancreas overproducing insulin in an attempt to lower blood sugar. A c-peptide above the normal range would support this result.
     
  9. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    Not sure how the two relate, given that c-peptide measures how much insulin you produce. But it's very very common for T1/LADA to be initially misdiagnosed as T2, as they initially present the same symptoms (high blood sugars). And a low carb diet will put LADA (which is essentially slow onset T1) into remission for a while, as your reduced insulin capacity can cope with a reduced carb load. But if you're low on insulin so early in your diagnosis then LADA seems much more likely than T2 to me (disclaimer, not a doctor). Also, weight loss is another classic T1 symptom. (Though obesity is a T2 symptom so I can see why your initial diagnosis was T2. )

    If you are T2 rather than T1 (by no means certain, just a possibility) then you'll probably progress to insulin quite soon (honeymoon period can last up to a couple of years) as other medication and diet becomes ineffective. You'll need to watch out for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which happens to folk with high blood sugar who don't have enough insulin in their system. I'd recommend keeping an eye on your ketone levels either via urine test strips or a blood testing meter. Low levels of ketones through nutritional ketosis on a low carb diet are normal, it's the high ones you want to watch out for. DKA kills fast without insulin, so go straight to a doctor (or accident and emergency) if you think you have it. It's an unfortunately common way for T1s to be diagnosed, though once you're on insulin it shouldn't recur (if you watch your bg levels).

    Good luck.
     
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  10. rosemaree

    rosemaree Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @EllieM thanks, I've been so unsure about everything and feel like doctors haven't been too helpful. I am on a plant based, quite high carb diet, originally got my levels right down but then stopped eating so well and exercising and my levels crept up again.

    I was asking people to share their insulin levels to try get an idea of types and progression, I am trying to be stricter with diet and start exercising again, if I don't get the right results will definitely keep pushing for more tests,
     
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