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is 3 too young to understand?

Discussion in 'Parents' started by nicolaknight86, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. nicolaknight86

    nicolaknight86 · Member

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    my daughter is 3 and a half and has been t1 since she was 10 months old
    I know she understands a lot, she knows she is diabetic and understands hypos and hypers.
    I have been letting her test her own blood sugars because she wants to and as she is learning her numbers it seems to be helping her too.
    my question is, should I be letting her do all this?
    its bad enough that she is different, should I be encouraging her?
    I want her to have an understanding from an early age and of course she knows the good foods and bad foods for her, she knows for example if she is hyper she can have sugar free jelly or cheese and if she is hypo she can have jelly babies! :D
    I think as she is in school I may have been telling her more, helping her understand because she was never any different until she started school and realised not all children have to have there bloods checked and injections :(
     
  2. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Why not ?

    If she is confident enough to do all those things then encourage her and support her. Things learned from an early age will probably stick in her memory and she will have a head start on other Diabetic's.
    She seems keen to learn. :)
     
  3. annettekp

    annettekp · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    If she is interested I would say go for it. Absolutely encourage her to be independent.

    My son is 2 and he now tells me when he is hypo by asking for juice and a biscuit so I don't think 3 is too young to understand.

    My son's cousin aged 7 is a T1 diabetic too and the other kids in our small community are learning about diabetes both from Erland and Ella. Ella is very independent and does most things herself under supervision. The other kids know when the alarm goes off on her pump that she needs to check her finger. The being different bit did bother Ella a wee bit and she was delighted when Erland was diagnosed last year because he was the same as her.

    Annette
     
  4. nicolaknight86

    nicolaknight86 · Member

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    thanks ladies!
    wanted to make sure I wasnt becomming a 'pushy parent' lol
     
  5. anniep

    anniep · Well-Known Member

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    If she is interested and asking and wanting to do, then you are not pushing. At this age children are sponges for information and to not tell/involve her would be giving the message that it is something odd that she can't cope with.

    With with my own kids, for anything in life, I worked on the principle if they can ask the questions then they deserve an answer. I didnt necessarily go into huge details just answered exactly what they wanted and then when they wanted more they could ask.

    It seems her interest is a good way for her to grow up naturally with her condition and learn responsibilty for it.
     
  6. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Ladies........ :shock: :? :lol:

    Not I m'dear ! :D
     
  7. anniep

    anniep · Well-Known Member

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    I have wondered............................. :mrgreen:
     
  8. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Annie.

    Sometimes I might show my feminine side........ :wink:
     
  9. nicolaknight86

    nicolaknight86 · Member

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    oops sorry! really must pay more attention lol :oops:
     
  10. Jen&Khaleb

    Jen&Khaleb · Well-Known Member

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    Thinking about the conversations I have with other parents of kids with T1 and I have to say there are 2 sides to early independence. It may seem like a new toy for while doing testing etc and learning the ropes but then there might come a time when the responibility becomes too much and expectations that your child perceives may become a burden. They might become really bored with it sooner than you think and you might have trouble taking over.

    I would actually be against early independence just to keep the pressure off them for as long as possible. I realise there is a gradual progression to indepence that some will achieve earlier than others. I still think 3 is too young and they should be thinking about far more fun things. Kids are growing up far too quickly these days.

    Only you really knows your child but there are many years ahead still to plan for. I can see it being a help at school if she can look after herself but the school and teacher's do have a resposibility to ensure safety.

    It isn't advised that children cross a road by themselves before they are 10 so looking after diabetes must come close in comparison. The learning is continuous but the responsibility is delayed.
     
  11. anniep

    anniep · Well-Known Member

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    I think there is a difference between being responsible for her own treatment and knowing about it and how to do it.

    To be informed and aware doesn't me she has to take over her own care before she is ready, but it means she will be know what is right and wrong in her own treatment.
     
  12. leggott

    leggott · Well-Known Member

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    Only you can decide what your child is capable of but I do agree that instilling an understanding at an early age cannot be a bad thing. it's a bit like good behaviour and manners, over a time of doing something it becomes second nature. I always teach my kids about healthy eating, brushing their teeth and remembering their pleases and thank yous and I don't see why teaching the basics of diabetes to be any different. Getting into good habits at an early age must make a difference later on, although I also understand that it's is important to protect children and that their feelings and capabilities change overtime.
     
  13. nicolaknight86

    nicolaknight86 · Member

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    I must add that her school are really brilliant with looking after her diabetes, her class teacher does her insulin everyday and this has meant she has settled very quickly!
    I was worried when she started that I would have to go in everyday to do this.
    But I also think its important that Jazmin realises if she wants birthday cake for example at school then she may need more insulin to cover this and just because the other children may have sweets after school doesnt mean that she is going to be able to!
    Also Jazmin is a fierely independant little girl and she wont always let me check her bloods so I dont mind supervising her whilst she does it herself, this doesnt mean that Im going to be letting her inject herself anytime soon so I think Its a bit harsh to compare Jazmin taking an interest in her own diabetes to crossing a road alone!!!! :lol:
    After all she is still a toddler!
     
  14. Belsmum

    Belsmum · Newbie

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    Hi,

    My daughter is 5 yrs old and was diagnosed t1 at 23 months, we've always been really honest with her when she asks questions, she knows she's diabetic and will happily tell anyone who asks, she's had an insulin pump now for just over a year and has only just started taking an interest in how it works, she'll sometimes ask if she can "do her pump" and we sit down and I talk her through it, but she wouldn't dream of touching it on her own. She likes to get her blood glucose testing kit ready on her own but does not want to prick her own finger, she thinks it'll hurt more if she does it herself so we just let her do what she is comfortable with and encourage her when she wants to do a bit more.
    I think if a child is wanting to do things themselves then refusing and insisting you do it for them is asking for trouble, just watch them carefully and encourage.
    At least that's worked for us xxx
     
  15. serankine

    serankine · Well-Known Member

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    I think its great she is taking an intrest. My daughter was diagnosed nov 2010 (4 yrs old) She does her finger prick test herself and gets it ready when she was first diagnosed we use to have to hold her down. We still sruggle with her insulin. But hope toget there soon. As long as your daugher feels comfortable doing it and your near her its great she is understanding diabeties and learning how to manage it. Can only be a good thing. :)
     
  16. Dippy3103

    Dippy3103 · Well-Known Member

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    Just my tuppence worth. A child of that age us like a sponge. Now is the time to teach lifelong good habits, so allowing her to take some control has to be a good thing. However I would still keep overall control. As Jen says it is a huge responsibilty for such a young child.
    I may be being callous here. But could it be worth making a chart so she can learn about numbers at the same time?
     
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