1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Is exercise pushing my blood sugar up?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by TooManyCrisps, Feb 6, 2016.

  1. TooManyCrisps

    TooManyCrisps Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    535
    Likes Received:
    2,525
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hello, I am newly diagnosed (6 weeks ago), after a random blood test gave a reading of 18 followed by an HbA1C of 97. GP suggested I try to lose some weight (BMI of 27) and retest the HbA1C in 3 months before considering meds.

    Since then I have researched on here, and stuck to a LCHF diet. I have also increased my exercise levels. I used to do 3 or 4 hours of classes at my gym per week, but now am trying to do 7 or 8. I eat as soon as i come home from work and then go to the gym.

    After advice on here, I bought a meter which arrived a week ago, and have been testing to try to identify which foods are pushing my bs levels up. On Monday I was horrified to find that my reading jumped from 5.3 before dinner to 8.7 2 hours after, I then tested again after 3 hours and the reading was 10. A similar thing happened throughout the week, although the spikes weren't as high - 8s and 9s though. However, these readings were all taken after exercise. So on Monday, the 2 hour reading was after I had done an hour's HIIT class, and I followed that by an hours kettlebell class, which is when I got the reading of 10.

    Fridays are a bit different as I do a class on the way home from work and then eat later. So yesterday, my post lunch readings were 6.8 (1 hour) and 6.1 (2 hours). I then tested immediately before going to the gym, which was 4 hours after lunch, and my reading was 5.6. I did an hour of circuit training, tested straight afterwards and my reading was 7.1. After another hour it had risen to 8.7 despite me not eating. I then ate dinner (which by chance was the same dinner as on Monday). 1 hour after dinner my reading was 8.6 and after 2 hours it was 6.7. So my readings were lower after eating than they were after exercising and not eating.....

    So it looks as though the high readings I had earlier in the week were possibly affected by the exercise. I'm now concerned that, despite my hard work with the diet, my readings will be high because of the exercise. And i won't be able to work out how the food itself is really affecting me.

    Has anyone had a similar experience? I'm reluctant to stop exercising. I could change the intensity and see if that made a difference? If anyone has some useful advice, I'd love to hear it. Everything I've read so far stresses that diet and exercise together are the way forward.
     
  2. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,862
    Likes Received:
    11,221
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Some have raised readings following exercise but that's not true for all. Mine always fall without fail and by big numbers.

    Get yourself into a routine and continue testing. For someone who was 97, you've made some decent improvements. Do NOT rush as it takes time for the body to adjust to the new lifestyle and diet.

    Good luck
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,668
    Likes Received:
    3,434
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Yes, exercise may cause a stress reaction. Your liver will release stored glucose to help out with your energy requirements but you can't use the glucose without insulin so your BG levels rise.

    Post in the exercise forum, and some of our more energetic members will give you some advice.

    (From the comfort of my sofa).
     
    • Like Like x 6
  4. Garr

    Garr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    425
    Trophy Points:
    103
    • Like Like x 4
  5. CathyN

    CathyN Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    238
    Likes Received:
    50
    Trophy Points:
    68
    Yes. Exercise tends to spike me - but then eventually it all relaxes down to good numbers. Better to exercise than not!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. TooManyCrisps

    TooManyCrisps Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    535
    Likes Received:
    2,525
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Oh, I didn't realise there was an exercise forum. Thanks, I will repost there.
     
  7. Sean01

    Sean01 · Guest

    Hi there. New ish too (Oct 2015)
    I exercise every day - 45 mins on the treadmill walking up hill. I exercise first thing in the morning (4:55 I'm in the gym) and I take the dog out for a brisk walk in the evening.
    When I test my blood glucose after training it is always high (around 7-8.5) but settles down to 5.5 to 6.5 for the rest of the day. The likelyhood is that whilst your body is exercising, your body is releasing fat stores and turning them into glucose so that they can be used in being metabolised to provide the energy you need in your exercise classes - so in a way - this is a good thing - just as long as they come down after training. Think of it like your heart beat. If your heart beat isn't high during exercise (number depending on age etc) then, let's be honest, your heart isn't in it. But if your heart beat is still high two hours after exercise you've got a problem.
    The skill is to get your body fine tuned so that it can react quickly and then stand down asap. My resting heart beat is 60, but I get so excited about training that it immediately jumps to over 100 as soon as I go through the gym door and then I want it up in the 130-150 region. (heart attack in 2006 so I don't go too high) After training I want it down below 75 asap and preferably lower - but I'm active during the day (office based but spread over 2 floors.) The same applies to blood sugar - expect it to be high immediately after exercise but keep an eye on getting it to the right level as soon as possible. (Credentials: Biology graduate, retired body builder from the mid 80's and I'm BEATING diabetes. Good luck. Read everything on this site, ask questions and don't panic (that comes later)
    And don't stop exercising - that will really mess your head up.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 2
  8. suhasini

    suhasini Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    43
    When I take a fasting or post prandial reading [1.5 to 2 hours after food] I was adviced not to do strenuous exercises or even brisk walking. So try taking these readings when you are relaxed at home,for a change and note the reading. I take my fasting as soon as I wake up and follow it with a good breakfast. Then i relax or just do my normal routine at home and take the next reading after 2 hours.
     
  9. dunelm

    dunelm Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    5,639
    Likes Received:
    15,649
    Trophy Points:
    198
    According to recent studies men should exercise before eating and women after. I don't eat until 12 noon and then within a 10 hour window. After exercising my blood sugar readings go up because my body is converting fat to sugar in order to burn it (I think) so this might be a good thing. I have managed to drop over 2 stone in weight and a high blood reading for me is now about 6.5
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. DeBonis1954

    DeBonis1954 Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Your rise in levels may be caused by not eating before you exercise. I do a lot of cycling (60kms a day) and I discovered that if I didn't eat before I rode my levels rose. Seems that if you don't have food to be turned into enegy your body generates its own by secreting stored up glucose. At least that is my finding.
     
    • Like Like x 6
  11. Brihaze

    Brihaze LADA · Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    43
     
  12. Brihaze

    Brihaze LADA · Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hard exercise will send glucose levels up as the liver responds to this by secreting more glucose into the blood stream for fuel, try lighter exercises this generally will reduce the livers output
     
    • Like Like x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook