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is it too late to reverse diabetes?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by carina62, May 7, 2014.

  1. carina62

    carina62 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm on a mission now to try and reverse my diabetes. I was diagnosed in 2009 as Type 2 and am diet/exercise controlled. I have a lot of weight to lose (about 5 stone) and I have started slimming world this week and am determined this time to lose my weight once and for all. My GP told me that I can reverse my diabetes if I lose weight - is this correct or is it too late for reversal after 4 years?
     
  2. mo1905

    mo1905 Type 1 · BANNED

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    Who knows ! Even if you can't totally reverse it though you can certainly make a big difference to your health and well being. Good luck.

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
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  3. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    It's definitely possible and the only way to find out if it's too late or not is to try. The best way to find out is to try the Newcastle Diet. Here is Professor Taylor's video lecture:

    http://www.fend-lectures.org/index.php?menu=view&id=94

    Written information about the diet:
    http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/diabetes/reversal.htm

    One thing not mentioned on the diet page, but discussed at the Optifast site is that you should have a tablespoon of olive oil with your daily vegetable allowance to guard against developing gallstones.
     
  4. Gappy

    Gappy · Well-Known Member

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    My sugar levels certainly improved when I lost weight-I accept diabetes is never cured but can largely live as I like, I'm certainly not a "sufferer"

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
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  5. Weens12

    Weens12 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I say go for it! Losing a lot of weight and committing to regular exercise can have a dramatic effect on blood sugar levels. Losing weight and reducing carbs is a very effective way of reducing insulin resistance, and is the key to dropping blood sugar levels. So your GP is right when he says you may reverse your diabetes if you lose weight.

    I lost 3.5 stones in six months and dropped my HBA1c from 83 at diagnosis to 39, and improved my cholesterol. My HBA1c has fallen further since then to 36. I don't take any meds for my diabetes. I've kept up my exercise regime and continue to follow a lowish carb, moderate fat way of eating.
    MY GP didn't think it was possible, was positively discouraging - so at least you have that advantage over me - boy, was he gobsmacked!

    Set yourself reasonable weight loss goals ( I recorded my weight loss goals in a spread sheet, started a food diary and charted the drops in blood sugar levels. I could see that as the weight came off, my blood sugar levels fell and this encouraged me to keep going - as it was obviously working! I walked and walked and walked and using a pedometer, steadily increased my exercise levels. Exercise became easier as the weight dropped off, and I began to enjoy it.

    You've nothing to lose - except 5 stone - and everything to gain: great control of your diabetes, and a better healthier, fitter, slimmer and happier you!
    Gobsmack your GP - but more importantly, take back control of your health.

    Good luck. I wish you every success, and let us know of your progress.
     
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  6. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
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    I was diagnosed 2005, T2. Tried all sorts of weight loss regimes. Only lost 7kg with no improvement in diabetes. In 2011 I read about Newcastle diet. Did it for 9 weeks. Blood glucose levels returned to non- diabetic within a week, and have stayed that way since. Total weight loss 42kg. I am still obese, but have not had diabetic blood glucose levels for two and a half years. I believe the change in blood glucose levels was due to the extreme reduction in calorie intake, which is based on the theory that people who have had bariatric surgery and are limited in the amount they consume have a reversal of diabetes. I preferred the non-surgical route. It seems to have worked for me even though I still have a lot of weight to use.

    Best wishes, it is possible, especially if you are determined.

    Pipp
     
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  7. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
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    I meant weight to lose. Haha. Though maybe if I did use it I would lose it!

    Pipp
     
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  8. runner2009

    runner2009 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is my opinion the ability to reverse diabetes really depends on the number of dead, dying or worn out beta cells one has in relationship to healthy ones. There are a lot of variables here - weight, level of insulin resistance to name a few.

    The other factor is what level of BG numbers you will accept as normal both from a fasting level and post meal levels and the amount of weight and food intake you are require to maintain these 'normal' BG numbers.

    My belief is that diabetes and even pre-diabetes is not really reversible in most cases if you can maintain a normal weight ( not on the low BMI side ) and basically eat anything you want without having what today is considered 'high' normal fast and post meal BG levels.


    Sent from Runner2009 Burt
     
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  9. jack412

    jack412 Type 2 · Expert

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    @carina62
    IMO from what I've read, nearly any diet will lose weight in the short term and I know it will improve your BG, if it's mainly insulin resistance you can get your D into remission/reverse by the newcastle or similar which gets your belly fat down to get the fat out of your liver and pancreas, everyone has their own BMI when this happens.
    As @runner2009 said, if your pancreas is worn out, the result won't be as good.

    As you know, most people don't change the way they eat when their diet finishes and eventually put back on the weight they lost. what I think is also important for us diabetics is to work out what we can happily eat for the rest of our lives and keep our weight healthy and our BG good. with that in mind I have chosen the LCHF way of eating for the rest of my life
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf
     
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  10. How is reversal defined and how is it measured? Thanks in advance.
     
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  11. jack412

    jack412 Type 2 · Expert

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    reversal or remission would have to be shown by a normal reading of a sugar drink test GTT
     
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  12. mo1905

    mo1905 Type 1 · BANNED

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    Reversal is different to a cure. It's defined as the absence of any signs/symptoms relating to a disease/condition and it would be measured using a BG meter as this is generally how diabetes is recognised. You will never get a universal answer regarding "cure" as different people have different ideas. With weight control, healthy diet and lifestyle, the condition can be controlled so well in some as to continually record non diabetic BG levels but if the lifestyle were to change, diabetes may return. Whether this is a cure or not is questionable.

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
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  13. sanguine

    sanguine Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would call that 'remission'. Like being an alcoholic. If (if, whadja mean if, when!) I get my BGs back to non-diabetic levels I will still be diabetic and will have to maintain the same diet/exercise regime to keep them there. No going back.
     
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  14. mo1905

    mo1905 Type 1 · BANNED

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    My point exactly, lots of different opinions ! This is one of those threads that could run and run. We've had them before and we'lo have them again :)

    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  15. andcol

    andcol I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    I can eat the junk again and have a normal blood glucose response to it (have done many tests). I call this reversed. However, I do know that if (please not let it be when) I go back to being as big as I was I will redevelop the abnormal response. My body is still genetically incompetent, but at least now I know about it. My body may well be somewhat damaged by my previous high levels so that it may return sooner if I grow outwards again than it did last time.

    Additionally the diagnoses could be wrong and some of us T2s are actually monogenic or late onset T1s and although losing weight and diet/exercise helps it will only hold it back for some period of time. This is one of the reasons we have to continue to be monitored for up to 4 years according to professor taylor.
     
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  16. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
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    For me the definition has been 3 monthly checks of HbA1c with a reading below 36. When I reach 3 years at this level, my GP nurse has said I will be removed from the diabetic register. Whether this is a recognition of me having achieved non-diabetic status, or just another way of saving the NHS money is debateable. I will not consider myself cured, and will have to be vigilant about what I eat forever. Maybe there should be a post-diabetic category?
     
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  17. sally and james

    sally and james Family member · Well-Known Member

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    I’m not sure that the terminology “cure”, “remission” or “reversal” are entirely relevant to T2 diabetes, which is why there are so many confusing opinions on the matter.


    Let’s take an analogy. You love gardening, so did your parents, you seem to have a genetic pre-disposition to getting out there and getting your hands covered in soil. When you come in from gardening, your partner exclaims, “Look at the state you’re in, go and wash, now!” Some time later, you are spotlessly clean. Have you been cured of a love of gardening? Are you in remission from the state of dirty hands? If you stick your hands in soil tomorrow, will they emerge clean? Silly questions.


    My feeling is that T2 is a “state” or “condition”, like dirty hands. You have probably inherited a pre-disposition towards T2, along with a possible love of gardening, from your parents. If you put on excess weight (that is excess for you, passing your trigger point) and you eat too many carbs and too much sugar, it’s the equivalent of the gardener being given a fine day and a trowel. Hands will get mucky and blood sugar will rise.


    The biggest downside of being in a T2 state is that raised sugar levels in the blood damage many parts of the body. Because much medical opinion and past experience has shown that people do not “wash their hands” of the T2 state, it has been described as irreversible and progressive, with more and more sugar damage occurring – unto death. Many, on this forum and beyond, have shown that, like the gardener, you can wash your hands of the T2 state and bring sugar levels down to normal. Therefor you can stop the progress of sugar damage. Also, the body is such an amazing thing that some of the past damage (depending on how extreme and for how long) may even reverse, over time.


    Passing or failing an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test is an irrelevance. It’s the equivalent of a gardening lover, who wants to keep clean hands, leaping into a big muddy puddle. Why do it?

    Sally
     
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  18. carina62

    carina62 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all so much for your comments and feedback - i'm glad i asked this question now as from the replies above, i feel that it IS possible to maybe reverse my diabetes as my GP suggests and gain control of my health. Since diagnosis i have changed my lifestyle to a certain degree ie i do lots more excercise like going to the gym and i love going on long walks but it is the food issue which i need to get around and i know with determination and willpower i may be able to achieve this :)
     
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  19. carina62

    carina62 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your very positive and encouraging post :)
     
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  20. carina62

    carina62 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes this has always been my understanding too - cure is different to reversal but nonetheless worth pursuing.
     
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