1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

just been told i have type 1 diabetes

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by skipjane, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. skipjane

    skipjane Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    hi
    just came out of hospital and been told i have type 1 diabetes
    i am on 4 injections a day 3 with meals and one at night
    me levels are still high
    only one in family with it so has come has a very big shock
    can anyone give me some advise
    many thanks :( :(
     
  2. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,872
    Trophy Points:
    248
    Hi Jane and welcome to the forum :)

    Here is the advice we give to new members and I hope you will find it helpful. Ask all the questions you need to and the T1 members of this forum will help you.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find well over 30,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes ... rains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips
    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  3. boabf

    boabf · Newbie

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi Ive been diabetic for 18 years now and high bloods can be a nightmare im on the same number of injections although the injection of lantus I now take in the morning but I think its this injection that needs to be increased by 4 or more depending on how high ur sugars are running good luck hope u get it all sorted.
     
  4. diggerhtfc

    diggerhtfc · Member

    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi skipjane, I was diagnosed three years ago now and understand you're shocked at the moment - I'm still a bit shocked now! The injections have become completely routine for me now and did so very quickly so I'm sure you'll be the same. Ask lots of questions - on here and of your healthcare professionals.

    One of the first things I did which I found very useful was talk to a diabetic specialist dietician who I was lucky enough to be able to see locally - she explained about carb counting and encouraged me to keep a diary of blood sugar levels and carbs in each meal. These really helped me get my head around how much I needed to inject depending on what I was eating and the effect it would have on my blood sugar levels.

    Also, don't be overly worried thinking about your first hypo - you're bound to experience one so make sure you have things around that will help, lucazade, glucose gel or whatever. You'll feel a bit funny for a few minutes but if you correct it early enough you'll be fine soon after.
     
  5. chr1234

    chr1234 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    23
    hi,

    I was diagnosed 2 years ago and still remember it to this day, my main tip is to keep talking, don't bottle up your feelings. Make sure you always carry out your test and keep in constant contact with your diabetic nurse and always ask any questions you have even if they seem silly!

    It will be hard at first but things will get better, you are now back on the road to health!
     
  6. pugsnumber1

    pugsnumber1 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Totaly agree with above, I was diagnosed with T1 2-3 years ago, wss very hard to come to terms with it, as although I was abit overweight I wasnt unhealthy.i just couldn't get my head round the fact that their was nothing I could do to change anything. But over time it has got better a good diet and excercise helps me.ive recently joined this forum and ive found it brilliant. It sounds like a soundbite but you must not let it control you, you must control it.you will over time find a way to handle it that suits you.
     
  7. Robert 2170

    Robert 2170 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi I was diagnosed at the end of December last year .a complete shock and still not sure I have it .i am on 4injection a day and testing 6times a day.
    Just listen to the diabetic nurse you will get good advise from them .and I am the only one in my family to have it at 47 I should not be type1they keep telling me and don't no what started it .
     
  8. James12

    James12 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    28
    Trophy Points:
    58

    Hi Jane,

    I was diagnosed September last year, I felt like i was thrown out of hospital without knowing what i was doing..

    Please read this book, its critical to your well being . Dr. Bernsteins diabetes solution (4th edition)

    You must learn to educate yourself as much as possible, as the NHS will help to some extent, but not as much as you will need.

    Type 1 diabetes is a horrible disease however today, its fully manageable and its more than possible to live a full and healthy life.
    You will be fine if you look after yourself.

    Best

    J
     
  9. mrman

    mrman Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,419
    Likes Received:
    2,674
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Common mis conception that cause your older u shouldn't be
    Type 1. Although more common in children and adults under 40, I was 32 when diagnosed. Anyone any age can get type 1. I was told on older people a virus can be a trigger to knock out your pancreas. I myself did have a nasty virus about 6 months prior. Alot of type 1 are misdiagnosed because of this reason.
    Sent from my GT-S5360 using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
  10. ewelina

    ewelina Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,341
    Likes Received:
    1,894
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I was diagnosed when I was 30 ( nearly 2 years ago) and i thought i was slightly too old for type 1. Nobody has diabetes in my family (not even type2) so it was a big shock. I adapted quite quickly and it is kind of routine now. I forgot how it was to eat without calculating how much insulin i need :) The best what you can do is research a lot and observe your body. How you react to certain foods (you will need to know a lot about carbohydrates, GI). Keep a diary so you will notice some paterns.
    we all have great ability to adapt to new situations so dont worry you will be fine soon :)
     
  11. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,781
    Likes Received:
    6,362
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi Jane,

    You have come to the right place, I was 39 when diagnosed type 1 last January, was a big shock but the sooner you can take on board the advice given and become an 'expert' in managing your blood sugars, the better you will feel. Someone said here keep talking, that's true, i'm not shy about telling everyone about my condition as I know it's better they understand than make assumptions. If you can get on DAFNE asap that would be great, i'm still waiting ! Good luck and keep in touch x
     
  12. dixon

    dixon · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21

    I was diagnosed type 1 just 3 years ago at the age of 43 - I swear to you mental acceptance was my biggest hurdle not sure if I am over it yet or will ever be. When I left hospital I was very afraid - but in a way in denial too because it was such a change in my life - I struck up a close relatioonship with my diabetic nurse who pushed to get me on the DAPHNE course and this increased my understanding a little bit better but I am still learning day by day especially throuhg this site - to be honest I believ the 'experts' are still learning- remember you are unique what works for others may not work for you but you will never know until you try and see the results for yourself-I still could get weepy when attending consultant think that is because in the outside world I have to continue as normal and I don't get a chance to pour my heart out - it is good too talk !
     
  13. Oliviat1999

    Oliviat1999 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi I am 13 and have just been diagnosed with T1 diabetes September 2012.
    Just had high blood sugars for 2hrs and have had insulin to bring me down but it didn't work just called up the hospital and they said wait half an hour and it will come down. I have rapidly come down and I am not stopping just waiting to go into hypo wiv mum and dad beside me! Any tips???? Xx :( for the record I know how a lot of you feel even though it hasn't been that long. It really is tough!!!
     
  14. skipjane

    skipjane Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    hi
    thanks very much for all your tips :D :D
     
  15. DarkForcesRebel

    DarkForcesRebel · Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    It will take some getting used to, but it becomes second nature
     
  16. skhwoody

    skhwoody · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    HI,

    i was 39 when diganosed and it knocked me for 6, and a week later was told i have graves disease, which led to the onset of Hyperthyroidism, which 15 months on is finally sorted. But this site has been a haven of information for me, i know i have not interacted that much, but being able to read other peoples stories has been a great help
     
  17. mazo

    mazo · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi been t1 since 2008 and only in last year I've managed to get better result, I attended d.i.c.e course at diabetic clinic which helps with carb counting and ratios.. Hope this helps


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  18. gabriele

    gabriele · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Skipjane wrote
    hi
    just came out of hospital and been told i have type 1 diabetes
    i am on 4 injections a day 3 with meals and one at night
    me levels are still high
    only one in family with it so has come has a very big shock
    can anyone give me some advise
    many thanks

    Hi Skipjane
    I can understand how you feel . When I was diagnosed 25 years ago I was very scared . Since then I 've been through many ups and downs .
    Now I feel very happy because last year I discovered the new diet, Low Carb High Fat. It chance my life so much . I 'm looking very positive into the future and hope that some of my damages will reversed.
    A good help is the book , Diabetes Solution , Dr R Bernstein .

    Good luck
    G.
     
  19. Nicola738

    Nicola738 · Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi Jane

    I am in exactly the same position. Came out of hospital around 6 weeks ago. I am newly diagnosed type 1 with noone in my family having it it was a total shock.

    I am also on 4 injections a day with 3 meals
     
  20. leighrickards

    leighrickards Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I know exactly how your feeling, I was diagnosed just over a week ago (type 1). Massive shock , no family history, not felt unwell, I just went for a scuba diving medical! I as well as taking in that I am now diabetic I have been told it is the end of my army career also! Lots to take in especially as I feel so well!!
    Rubbish having diabetes however life throws us problems we just have to deal with them and get on with life! Stay positive it's helping me. Well along with a strong family


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook