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just diagnosed very confused about what i can and cant eat

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by wavydavy, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. wavydavy

    wavydavy Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi everyone was diagnosed with type 2 about five weeks ago had blood sugar level of 16.4 me and my partner cut our sugar out totally started eating loads of fruit had sweetex in my coffee to be totally honest been hard but I've stuck to it so to my shock had check of my blood sugar today and its gone up to 18.4 Why??? Was old by the chemist to cut out potatoes white bread pasta rice but what's the alterntive? Also what's a good cereal just found out cornflakes and rice crispies turn to sugar I need educated and fast can anyone help?? Please answer some nice suggestions
    Dave :(
     
  2. Tylers73

    Tylers73 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Some fruits have high sugar levels especially grapes I miss grapes. I am type 1 so I can insulin to bring my levels down. You need to see a dietician really. Have brown bread instead and sweet potato.
     
  3. Sancho panza

    Sancho panza Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi welcome
    Do you have access to a testing kit at home you need to test after eating to find out what foods affect you the most.
    It's going to be a shocker but potato rice pasta white bread etc will raise the sugar levels of most of us
    It's all about carbohydrates I'm afraid.
    @daisy1 will be along with her great post for the newly diagnosed and other people with a better idea of diet will soon help you onto the right path.
    Stick around and ask if you have a question
     
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  4. poohtiggy

    poohtiggy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Even brown bread and sweet potato can spike some people, the only way to really know what you can eat safely is to test before and after eating anything. Most people cannot tolerate cereals but I had 2 weetabix for breakfast, pre test was 6.O 2hrs later 4.7 Just had salmon fillet with cauliflower and broccoli cheese before 5.2 after 2hrs 6.2 this afternoon I had a gala Apple which gave me a spike of 2 What suits one person doesn't suit everyone so test, test and test to discover what you can and can't eat without spiking
     
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  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @wavydavy

    Hello Dave and welcome to the forum :)

    Here is the information which we give to new members which I hope will answer some of your questions about diet. Basically you need to cut down the carbohydrates as they will make your levels rise. Fats are OK contrary to what you have probably been told. Other members will be along soon to give you some more ideas of what you can and can't eat.



    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 140,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  6. sanguine

    sanguine Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @wavydavy , welcome. Your chemist has got the right idea. Eating loads of fruit isn't the answer though, small amounts of berries is OK.

    Have a read of the first item in my sig below and ask any questions.
     
  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. All carbs turn to glucose in the body so these must be kept sensibly low to keep blood sugar low.
     
  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Hi and welcome,

    Yes, all carbs convert to glucose once inside the system, no matter whether they are white or wholemeal. We also need to be careful with fruit and milk as these also contain a lot of sugar. All breakfast cereals are high in carbs. It isn't just sugar you need to avoid - sugar is just another carb. As for fruit, berries are the best, bananas and other tropical fruits are the worst.

    Try a breakfast of full fat Greek yogurt with a few raspberries/strawberries/blackberries added. (and I mean a few, not a whole punnet!). Or what about eggs. Eggs cooked any which way are excellent, also bacon, a tomato and mushrooms, or even 97% meat sausages. You can eat any meat, chicken, fish, cheese, eggs, a few nuts, seeds, most but not all vegetables, salads, tomatoes, mushrooms, butter, cream instead of milk in coffee or with berries. The list is endless. Have a good read round the forum. There are plenty of recipes and food ideas.
     
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  9. Phlogiston

    Phlogiston Gestational · Well-Known Member

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    Hi WavyDavy,
    Welcome here. Lots of good advice.
    I was diagnosed mid January and I think I'm starting to get my head round things.
    Long term diabetes living requires a different mindset - meals no longer built round carbs, and I haven't yet eliminated the cravings for all of them. I still get peckish ever so easily. I take it a day at a time -sometimes a meal at a time.
    I've pretty much given up on breakfast cereal - even porage. I am not eliminating all carbs, but my portions of rice, pasta and potato are now tiny compared to last year.
    Sadly, fruit needs to be reduced - the one sweet thing I can't let go of.
    Stay mindful
    best wishes
    Adam
     
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  10. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I arrived and got even more confused!
    It does start to make sense though.
    Want to lose weight and lower blood sugars?
    Have a fry up every morning but swap the beans for toms and ditch the toast.
    Whaaaa are these people crazy?
    The NHS advice is generally the worse you'll get.
    Not always but they are mostly way behind the times.
    I was getting worse eating what I thought was healthily and decided even though it sounded a little crazy to go on the low carb hf route that many on here follow.
    It's not a temporary diet but a lifelong change and it isn't as difficult as it first sounds.
    On LCHF I have ....
    Gotten my blood sugars under superb control.
    Lost weight.
    Lowered my blood pressure.
    My cholesterol levels are coming into line slowly too.
    My surgery are amazed.
    I chose to ignore them and became the only diabetic at the surgery who is taking less medication for everything and getting healthier by the day!
    Click on the link and have a read of the route I and many on here decided to follow .... read to the bottom.
    Welcome to a fantastic place for your health and well being.
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf
     
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  11. plonkish_

    plonkish_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've been following the LCHF advice and I've also lost weight and my blood glucose levels are ok (most of the time, but early days for me!)

    I found breakfast the hardest but I now have omelette with cheese or bacon most of the time. I've also discovered flax (linseeds) which, when ground as meal make a good cereal breakfast. it's low carb has omega3 with the fibre that was missing from my new diet. I have it with a few frozen raspberries and double cream and it takes 2 minutes. I got the seeds whole and grind them myself in a coffee mill

    1/4 cup flax seed meal
    1/4 cup water (some of the liquid can be sugar-free syrup, if desired)
    1 egg
    Sugar substitute to taste
    Mixins as desired (see below)
    PREPARATION

    Mix flax meal, egg, and water in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on high for about 45 seconds. Move the cooked part of the pudding towards the center of the bowl and add any mix-ins you want. Microwave for about 45-60 more seconds, depending on mix-ins (frozen fruit will need even longer cooking, as it will cool down the pudding). Stir and eat.
     
  12. orchid5

    orchid5 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I too am following a low carb food plan, losing weight and feeling very healthy, still early days as only 6weeks in since diagnoses, taking 2,5g metformin now; BS ranging between 8.1 in the am to 6.4 at bedtime. Advice been given, don't need to check bs or follow any kind of diet and eat in moderation! Hmmmmmm needless to say I do test every day as so newly diagnosed and am eating a low carb diet to help myself, I work in a profession that sees the end result of poorly controlled diabetes and I for one certainly don't want to experience that.
     
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  13. Phlogiston

    Phlogiston Gestational · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Orchid,
    "Moderation" can mean too many things. Hope you soon see the benefits of low carbs.
    Adam
     
  14. orchid5

    orchid5 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    HI Phlogiston.

    Many thanks for your kind welcome, yes I totally agree, what my moderation is compared to someone else's would be different, I love fruit but so much natural sugars in them, however try to stick to the low glycaemic ones, had to give up my fav which was a banana each morning, I still have yet to increase my Metformin to 3g daily so anticipate taking that dose by next Monday as the GP wanted me to increase it slowly, BS this morning was 8, last night was 6.4 so on the right track. I just can't comprehend why you would treat someone by medication and tell them not to test their BS that just doesn't compute with me at all, however I have brought my own testing kit, I don't mind paying for the strips as it works out at 10p daily, if that saves my eyesight, limbs and cardiac system then I'm all for it.

    I have lost since commencing on low carbs just over half a stone, have a few more to lose so maybe, just maybe I can reduce my medication once my visceral fat has gone, fingers crossed, take care.
     
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  15. Janet Leigh Trevor Godwin

    Janet Leigh Trevor Godwin Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi....I was diagnosed last August....no help from my Doctor....I did all the research myself and found the LCHF diet and that's what I have stuck too...I have lost nearly 2 stone and my readings have all come down...my fasting bloods are now between 4.3-4.5 ....my HbA1c is 43 ...I panicked at first and even cried the first time I went out for a meal...but after buying my own meter and testing all the time I now know what I can and can't eat...I have started jogging again after a 2 yr break....my diabetes was hereditary as my mum was T2 as well....oh I'm on 2x500g Metaformin ...but Doc says he might reduce it after my next test.....
     
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  16. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    That's a great intro! :D

    And those are great figures too.

    Glad you decided to post, especially with such brilliant results.
     
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  17. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Janet Leigh Trevor Godwin and welcome to the best place for your health and sanity.
     
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  18. Moosepig

    Moosepig Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there, i was diagnosed in august with type 2 and i felt angry, frightened, isolated and confused about what i could eat and drink. I was very lucky in that my diabetes nurse got me a place on a DESMOND course quickly and sent me to a dietician within a week of diagnosis. I'm also very lucky that my daughter is a pharmacist and has been the hugest help. Also this site is full of kind sympathetic helpful people, so while i wont make any nutritional suggestions, as there are wiser people here than me, what i will say is - you aren't alone,if you feel down or frightened, ask for help here - I've been helped so much and had so many good suggestions. Good luck, welcome to the elite and don't let it get to you. X
     
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  19. Janet Leigh Trevor Godwin

    Janet Leigh Trevor Godwin Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you Brunneria....:))
     
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  20. JAY1JAY1

    JAY1JAY1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    H
    Sorry Dave can't help I'm in the same boat, the only thing is as jet I don't test my blood so can't even tell if I'm doing wrong :confused::confused::confused:
     
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