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Just found out im type 2 diabetic!

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by pinky_69, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. pinky_69

    pinky_69 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi i just found out today that im type 2 diabetic and i feel really down about it...how did you all feel? My readings on a fasting blood test were 7.9 and the hibic or what ever it is 50....im only 47 which i think is young....how did you all feel and how you feeling now? So glad i found this site :)
     
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  2. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
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    Welcome to the forums Pinky, yes it is a little daunting when first diagnosed. I am Tagging @daisy1 who will be along with lots of information for our newcomers.
     
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  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Hi and welcome,

    It's natural and normal to feel down about it when first diagnosed. You will also feel confused and a bit scared. We have all been there. It will pass, I promise you. You are young to me (I'm 68) but there are many people on here with Type 2 that were younger or much the same age as you when diagnosed. It isn't restricted to us oldies you know!

    Your HbA1c of 50 is only just above the diabetic start line (anything 48 or over) so it has been discovered early and you have every chance of getting those levels down with a bit of effort.

    Have a good read round these forums and the main website and try to learn as much as you can about this disease, how the pancreas works, what insulin does, what the recommended safe levels are, what tests we have and what the numbers mean. The more you know the better you will understand what it all means and what you can do about it. Ask questions, and good luck..
     
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  4. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @pinky_69 - Hello and Welcome to the Forum. I was 42 when I first suspected I could be diabetic as I had all the symptoms, but my GP said I was 'borderline'. It was 2 years later at 44 that I was diagnosed with Type 2 and that was 16 years ago.:)
     
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  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @pinky_69

    Hello Pinky and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful and interesting. The information about carbs will be particularly useful to you. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    LOW CARB PROGRAM:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/low carb program


    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  6. muzza3

    muzza3 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @pinky_69

    Welcome to the Forum
    I was stunned when I was first diagnosed. I really had no idea so I went to the dietitians etc and did what I was told. I really wish I had found this forum back then

    Now I feel great. I have my BG under control, have stopped meds and lost a lot of weight and this was from a horrible place I had got myself to just 5 months ago

    Use this site and I am sure you will get all the advice and assistance that I did. And ASK questions if you don't know
     
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  7. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @pinky_69 and welcome to the forum. It is a shock when you first hear that diagnosis and takes a bit of time to get your head around it. But you have done well in finding this forum, there is a lot of good advice and support on here. This condition can be controlled.
     
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  8. Sean01

    Sean01 · Guest

    First up - Hello.
    Second up: credentials: Type 2, metformin, exercise and diet, Diagnosed Oct 15. My reading was 16.0. I'm 50 years old.

    Now the stuff you need to know: Day 1 - hit me like a brick wall - just how many complications can this cause - answer too many. So I sat down with my wife and told her I was scared, very scared and then she asked me what I am going to ask you right now: What are you going to do about it? and there is only one answer. Respect the condition but come out fighting. I got up and went to the supermarket and changed the diet that evening - instantly (I'm a bit 100% or nothing - invariably going for the 100% option).
    I will admit that for the first two weeks I was in tears (literally) going round the supermarket. it was like visiting a cemetery and seeing all your old dead mates - bread, pasta, chocolate, sugar - you know the ones! ( I don't well up anymore.)

    5 months on: I use a treadmill every day for around 45 mins. I eat clean. (I occasionally have a small roast potato and I did have a list of things to eat over Christmas - just the one of everything)

    Join in on the forum. share the good news, share in other people's good news. This really is the place where we are all in it together - although some have much bigger demons to fight than others. This is part of your new family now - so make friends.

    Read up everything on this site and be encouraged to keep going. This is not a race. This is life - it's an endurance event.

    So far I have lost over 6 stone. I am still on heart medication having lived with high blood pressure for years, but my blood pressure is now 100/70 (excellent) and my resting heart beat is 60 (incredible). I've lost over 8 inches on my waist. - all down to dealing with my diabetes. In fact I would say that becoming T2 has probably added years to my life. I don't know what will eventually finish me off but it won't be heart related.

    You are 47 years old. You're not the youngest and you are not the oldest and although I am 50, I prefer to state that I am a level 50 grand master - it sounds so much more awesone. Now set your sights on making it through to be a very high level grand master and go for it - and the best advice: three things: eat right, walk every day respect the illness but fight it too.

    Good luck
     
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  9. Patricia21

    Patricia21 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome,I think we all know how you feel.try not to worry.
    Your levels can be sorted out by diet.I was 58 HbA1c Im now 46.
    All the best.
     
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  10. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    My Fasting blood sugar level was 12.6 and my Plasma Glucose was 13 the GP isnt too bothered about it but is that a really high score?
     
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  11. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    Can you tell me your opinion on bread, pasta and Lentils as I love them all. I can cut back on Bread and pasta but love my lentils. Baked beans? What spread do you use? Baked beans? Eggs?
     
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  12. Ann_W

    Ann_W Type 2 · Member

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    Hi Pinky, welcome to the forum and you've come to the best place for advice. I got my diagnosis at the end of september last year but it wasn't really a shock to me because although I wasn't diagnosed with gestational diabetes, I had glucose tolerance tests during both pregnancies and T2 is in the family. An aunt had it, my 2 brothers have it, my sister is in remission and was younger than you when she was diagnosed, but I was disappointed. I think some sort of reaction is only natural The good news though is that you can take control and this forum will help you to do that. My HbA1c on diagnosis was 108 - that brought about a sharp intake of breath I don't mind telling you but last week my reading was 66 so I know what I'm doing is working. I did the low carb program available from this site and found that very useful. Feel free to ask questions, there's always someone around to help.
     
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  13. Ann_W

    Ann_W Type 2 · Member

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    Very inspiring post Sean, thank you.
     
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  14. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Your profile says you don't have diabetes. Is that correct or are you waiting for a diagnosis?
     
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  15. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    I do but can't change it, tried three times
     
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  16. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    I do but can't change it, tried three times
     
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  17. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Go to the top of this page and hover over your name. Pick "personal details" from the drop down list. You will find you can change it on there.
     
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  18. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @CDudley - I was going to suggest that you contact @Administrator -/@Giverny by putting a @ then her name. But, wait and see if you succeed with what Bluetit1802 has instructed you to do first.:)
     
  19. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    Tried that lol - shows an error page
     
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  20. CDudley

    CDudley Type 2 · Active Member

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    It wont let me change it
     
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