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Ketostix

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Seriously_Sax1989, Aug 31, 2014.

  1. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello what does the "+" signs on the colour chart mean on the ketostix?

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Miss90

    Miss90 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It means there are traces of ketones. I had ++++ a few weeks ago so I rushed myself to a and e but luckily it didn't develop into full blown DKA, just ketosis. But if you are in doubt call nhs direct or go to hospital - better be safe than sorry!
     
  3. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ok thanks, just abit confused as the darker the colour, the more "+" there are, I guess the more there are means the higher the chance of dka?
     
  4. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes the more plusses, the worse the ketones are, and the more chance of ketoacidosis.

    If you look at the colour chart on the side of the tube, in addition to plusses, it gives the ketone reading in g/L, mg/dL, and mmol/L like a blood ketone meter does. (Not to be confused with blood glucose readings in the same units).
     
  5. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Btw I think a single + is "mild" or "weak" ketones, which is more ketones than "trace'.
     
  6. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ok thanks, I don't understand the mg/l etc so I'll just go on the assumption that the more + you have the higher the risk!
     
  7. Britishbob

    Britishbob Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Can't believe you are using Ketostix - get a glucose meter that measures blood ketones as it tells you what's happening I. Your body NOW not a couple of hours ago - if off a GP insist on having one or visit a Hospital Diabetes Nurse - you can dehydrate through Ketones affecting the concentration of your urine and the results
     
  8. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had the ketone meter nearly two years before I persuaded my GP to prescribe the strips for it.

    Some have to make do with what they've got.
     
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  9. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Dehydration doesn't actually skew the results. Your urine actually does have a higher concentration of ketones when you are dehydrated, and more to the point, so does your blood.

    But yes a ketone meter is better, if available and affordable. I don't think anyone is going to die from using ketostix rather than a ketone meter, however. And a box of ketostix costs about the same as a single blood ketone meter test strip.
     
  10. Britishbob

    Britishbob Family member · Well-Known Member

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    It's a bit harder to pee than test blood when dehydrated and the Ketone blood strips are miles more accurate - so much so that clinical guidelines state use of a meter not Ketostix - CCGs trying to save money feel it is a good way to save money - until someone goes DKA at £1,000 per day in hospital - there are papers available on the net
     
  11. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ketostix are not going to fail to detect impending DKA and it takes literally one drop of urine to do a ketone test. Anyone who can't pee one drop of urine needs to hydrate and if they can't do that they need to go to A&E anyway.

    Do you have the links to these papers?
     
  12. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    It's really hard to persuade gp's to prescribe the strips for the ketone meters, my old gp refused and said that Ketostix were good enough, it was only when he left the surgery did I eventually get a Dr to prescribe the strips for the Glucomen LX Plus meter, I'm sure the strips are around £25 for 10.
     
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  13. Seriously_Sax1989

    Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've got a meter that tests for ketones but the docs are reluctant to prescribe the strips as you get 10 in a box and they cost around £20.

    Can I just add that I have an up to date meter and I understand that the ketone strips give a more accurate reading. I was just wondering what the + signs meant as I have ketostix to use for the time being.
     
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  14. Britishbob

    Britishbob Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry just had a look and cannot find a link - did find references under Diabetes Ketoacidosis
    In short there are 3 ketones acetoacetate, acetone and Betahydroxybuterate - please excuse spellings - Betahydroxybuterate makes up 80% and is measured by the meters - Ketostix only measure the other 20% hence not very accurate
     
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  15. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's true that ketostix does not measure BHB but this is unimportant in the detection of ketoacidosis and only comes in to play when detecting nutritional ketosis, eg when doing an LCHF diet. For detecting imminent DKA it is not a problem. The main practical advantage of the meters for DKA as you rightly say Bob is earlier detection of ketoacidosis.
     
  16. jack412

    jack412 Type 2 · Expert

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    I think that is too rational, the hospital budget doesn't matter to the local DR and his budget. so the 20 quid matters to the practice more than the 1,000 quid the hospital will spend.
    bonuses and such I think
     
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  17. Spiker

    Spiker Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Good point Jack. Now if the hospital billed the hospitalisation costs back to the GP, the GP might see things differently!
     
  18. Kelsie

    Kelsie · Well-Known Member

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    Same as what Noble head and spiker said, my GP wouldn't give me the meter as he also said the strips are good enough. My brother has one but that was only because he happened to be given a new meter at the hospital which was a combined glucose and ketone tester. Unfortunately not all GP's are as willing to give prescriptions for certain equipment due to cost, so urine test strips I have :)
     
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