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Learning to drive...is it worth it as seen a lot of iasuses on here

Discussion in 'Driving and DVLA' started by Jason91, Jun 14, 2021.

  1. Jason91

    Jason91 · Member

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    Is it worth me even trying to get a car
     
  2. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 · Moderator
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    Being type 1 (or insulin dependent other types) and driving does have complications but many people do drive successfully, @searley drives much larger vehicles too

    As to whether it's worth it, well it opens options. It can be cheaper for commuting. But in sone parts of the country there is good transport links that mean you don’t need one

    it’s a very invividual choice.

    what are your concerns?
     
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  3. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, as it will make you more self reliant.

    I got my driving licence when I was 18, and bought my first second hand car a year after that for about $1000.00.

    I have never looked back for job opportunities, or having to rely on public transport all of the time.
     
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  4. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Personally I would say yes. Even though I was a very badly controlled Type 1 for 20 years, I eventually learnt to drive in 1988.
    Remember that in those days treatment was unsophisticated - large meter, no CGMs etc. and the only thorn in the flesh is having to have the licence renewed every 3 years or sooner, depending on medical outcomes. This includes a visual fields test. I have had a blind spot, due to retinopathy, at about 5 o'clock, for many years, but this does not affect road usage. The other thing is filling in the forms each time. If you decide to go ahead, make sure you keep ALL medical correspondence, especially dates of hospital clinic visits, GP visits, and Eye Screening letters. I have always photocopied the DVLA forms so that it makes life easier for the next time - eg the names of practitioners, Post Codes and addresses of surgeries and clinics, and on several occasions have had a completed form in front of me when phoning the DVLA at Swansea. I hope you enjoy the freedom!
     
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  5. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    Diabetes shouldn't factor into any decision you make about whether it's "worth" getting a car. (In my humble opinion).
     
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  6. Fenn

    Fenn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Unless you live and never leave a city, unless you like being on public transport, then yes! Is it trickier than for “normal folks”? You betcha! But you got lemons, make the best dang lemonade you can bruv.
     
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  7. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Jason91

    Interesting point

    I'd of said a few years deffo.

    But I have been reading how many of the younger age groups ( all Inc non diabetic) are considering not bothering

    Self drive, the clamp down in bigger cities of non conforming cars etc, the rise of E- vehicles ( e- scooters E- bikes)
    meaning electric may replace ICE in short order

    So should you still try...?

    I'd say yes, for all the above reasons.

    But I'd certainly try to be aware of the prevailing conditions and direction of how we actually drive.

    Best of luck on the test.
     
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  8. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Oh hell yeah.. Get a valid licence first though.. ;)

    My current job involves driving a builder's tipper truck. Nothing like the beast @searley drives.

    I've toured Europe with a band, toured Europe with my wife.
    Got somewhere private in the car park on a lunch break...
    I love my Jap imported "day van."

    Don't let your diabetes hold you back.

    It does depend on what you require or expect from entitlement to drive & associated vehicle ownership too?

    My first motor was 600 quid. Then got a Bedford CF van for £400? Lol, lived in it for 3 weeks as a student when I screwed up the accommodation changeover dates.

    I feel it's great to learn some (at least basic.) maintenece too.. (Know what's under the bonnet.)
    Sometimes it's quicker to get it running yourself than wait for breakdown cover..

    A little like being T1. :)
     
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  9. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    It may not be worth owning a car, but a driving license is a useful piece of paper/card to have, as it gives you the option to drive where necessary, even if that's only borrowing or sharing a car with friends. ( It's also a handy piece of ID as an added bonus.) Having said that, plenty of non diabetics of your age choose not to drive or have a license if they live in a city with decent public transport, but don't let the diabetes be the factor that drives your decision.

    As a T1, I've held driving licenses in the UK (renew every 3 years), Australia (renew every 2 years with mandatory doctor's letter and eye check) and New Zealand (they don't seem to care at all, my driving license is for ten years!!!). When I lived in the UK, the renewal process was pretty easy, I just had to tell them who my current doctors were. Of course, you have to be hypo aware, if you're not then that's a different story.

    Anyway, good luck, whatever you decide.
     
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  10. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My main reason was employment, the ability to get to work on time was first of my priories. Slept in the back of my first car several times after too many beers at a party.

    I have forgotten how many times I have driven around Australia either working or recreational,

    To cap it off, I have never let the medical problems I have, to hold me back from either working or driving safely at the present time.

    Get a licence, get a life. :D
     
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  11. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I guess you mean is it worth it when you have diabetes and you are on glucose lowering medication or in a position where your driving is likely to be restricted/affected? If the answer to your question was yes BEFORE you got diabetes then it's yes now in my opinion. Same with anything else, should having diabetes stop us from doing normal things?, I say no, you just have to factor in any diabetes associated issues.
     
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  12. Jason91

    Jason91 · Member

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    Cheers all just worried about costs ect
     
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  13. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Being a diabetic using insulin should not cost any extra than it would cost someone who doesn't use insulin, but yes it may not be cheap for anyone, especially if young
     
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  14. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Apart from the costs of the the car, whether brand new or secondhand, car insurance and rego are the most expensive of your yearly costs, maintenance and servicing is getting more expensive each year, followed up by weekly fuel costs to get from A to B.

    If you are a T1 diabetic the insurance will most probably have a surcharge on it for sure.
     
  15. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Then if it's simply costs...

    I'd say there are some options, but a downside with each

    Car & running costs.

    Buy a newer car:
    probably get better reliability, probably
    ..but fixing it may be a more specialised task beyond the average driver

    Buy an older car:
    potentially less reliable, potentially

    But may have more areas that can be fixed by the average driver .

    I'd recommend joining a forum, most car brands even models will have an enthusiastic owners forum, full of helpful advice
    ( Had windows unit fail on a vauxhall..
    cost £ 170 for the unit
    Forum owners explained how to open unit, and check ball bearing..fixed for pennies & a little of my time...learning how to fix things, very rewarding mentally & cash wise )

    So basic servicing & some DIY can go a long way to reducing the running costs & a cheaper older model is likely to cost less to insure*

    *Model, cc, ins group, etc can have a Great impact.

    Got a car ( been driving over 45 years) after a few years car free ( motorcycle) so NCB lapsed :rolleyes:

    Had used cousins car, Mazda 626, wanted to buy similar, but ins group placed that way out of my price range, so selected cheaper model to insure to get my ratings back up

    So insurance can be moderated somewhat, but age is always going to define a higher cost, sadly

    Black box in car limits mileage, records data, can reduce ins cost ..might be of use in the early years of driving.
    Some insurers offer different schemes to the norm, monthly - daily, all more expensive but may be of some use.

    Small note, don't assume TPFT will always be cheapest, fully comp can sometimes be lower, weirdly
    always check comparison sites
    found for same car conditions etc,
    Price ranged from £200+
    To £1000+...eek :woot:


    But while I would always agree a licence offers greater freedom, it's a fact we are in for very changing times transport wise over the next 5 years or so

    So worth taking stock, but I'd say, get the test done, and once you've passed ..going to be months, anyway, I would suggest.

    then see how the car market is shaping up v your personal situation money wise

    I doubt driverless cars will be a thing for many years, so a licenced driver will still be a requirement.

    E vehicles will likely drop in price,
    and ice cars may well sell more cheaply, as people are persuaded/coersed into trading up

    So much to ponder once you pass.
     
    #15 jjraak, Jun 16, 2021 at 3:44 AM
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2021
  16. Jason91

    Jason91 · Member

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    More the insurance side of things cost ect
     
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  17. searley

    searley Type 1 · Moderator
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    There is no reason why you shouldn't I have hgv which is more strict

    The only issues you will have

    Renewing license every 3 years
    Regular blood tests for driving. Or cgm
    NO hypos needing the help of other during your 'awake' hours

    So if you want a car it's worth the little extra effort
     
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