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longhaul flying

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by barge, Aug 12, 2008.

  1. barge

    barge Type 2 · Active Member

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    i am going to australia in september stopping over in singapore for 2 nights.I take metformin 1 in the morning 1 at lunch 2 at evening meal and 2amaryl in the morning please tell me how to cope with time changes i am quite well controlled at the moment.
     
  2. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Barge,
    I did a similar trip a few years ago (Singapore then NZ) whilst on metformin and amaryl.
    Singapore is 7 hours ahead and western Australia is 9 hours ahead. What I did was to take my normal meds on the departure day. At Singapore I had my usual morning meds with breakfast, so they were 7 hours late, then the remainder of the meds with meals at the normal intervals. Again when you continue to Australia, there would only be a further 2 hour delay in taking each of the meds.

    The important thing is to ensure that the meds are always taken in conjunction with breakfast, lunch and evening meal, not simply at pre-set time intervals. This is particularly important with the Amaryl as this forces the pancreas to produce insulin. If this is not done at the same time as a meal then it will make your blood sugar drop drastically, resulting in a hypo.
     
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