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Low Carb/High Protein diet

Discussion in 'Food, Nutrition and Recipes' started by phillic, Apr 9, 2008.

  1. phillic

    phillic Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi there,
    I am new to this site,
    I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes approx 1 year ago but am having difficulty coming to terms with it.
    I am supposed to be taking Metformin but have stopped taking it as it was upsetting my stomach.
    I have started a low carb diet (Dr Charles clarks New Low Carb Diet)
    I have found that my bg levels havwe reduced and are usually approx 6 in the mornings. I am pleased with this.
    I am just a bit concerned about the diet as diabetes nurse and dietician are advising against this diet.
    Does anyone have any advice?

    Christine
     
  2. LesleyB

    LesleyB · Active Member

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    Hi Christine, I am type 1 so can't offer you too much help with your questions but there are loads of other T2's here that should be able to help you out.

    I think the problem that the dietitians have with the low carb, high protein diet is the level of fat usually associated with this type of diet. There are many differing views on this forum regarding fat levels and carb levels. Your dietitian will be offering you advice based on the current medical opinion.

    Have you checked if there is an alternative to Metformin? I don't think you should stop taking your medication but if there is an alternative medication for you to take, it makes sense for you to be prescribed this instead.

    I hope someone comes along to give you better advice soon, but hang in there!
     
  3. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Christine and welcome to the forum.

    Carbohydrates is quite a contentious topic within the diabetic community. Unfortunately the stance of the government's dieticians and Diabetes UK (that is the national diabetes body, not this website) is that a healthy diet for a diabetic is one that is based on a high carbohydrate intake. That makes as much sense as telling a patient who is allergic to aspirin to take enormous doses of it, or a patient who is obese to just eat more and more until they burst!

    Carbohydrate converts to sugar in the blood, so the more carbohydrate you eat then the more blood sugar you will have. The less carbs you eat then the less blood sugar you will have. It really is as simple as that - but it is a concept that seems to be completely beyond the understanding of our official bodies. Unfortunately our National Health practitioners (including state registered dieticians) are pretty much forced to go along with the government's guidelines, whether or not they actually agree with them.

    For many years our governmental bodies have simply gone with whatever the US says (its cheaper than having to do our own research!). However, there is some light at the end of the tunnel because even in the US, where recommendations of a high carb diet were fuelled not by medical science but by political lobbying by farmers and the wheat processing industry, there has been a realisation that they may have got it wrong. US government dieticians now recommend that carbohydrate and protein intake should be the same, and the American Diabetes Association just this year has recommended a much lower carb intake for diabetics - still too high but at least they are moving in the right direction.

    I hope this helps ease your concerns. I know it seems wrong to go against advice given by a medical professional but I'm afraid that if you want to control your diabetes then that is exactly what you must do - as you have been proving for yourself very successfully.
     
  4. armchairandy

    armchairandy · Newbie

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    Christine

    Im type 2 I do not want to add to the carb question, but would say that I had trouble with metformin, when I was diagnosed. Im ok now but it took a couple of years and different types of metformin to find the one that worked for me currently glucophage. Im afraid its trial and error - you have to insist that your doctor/team change medication. They work for you not the other way round.

    Andrew
     
  5. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Christine,

    Sorry, should have mentioned that Glucophage SR is a slow-release version of metformin and is much kinder on the stomach. GPs can sometimes be a bit reluctant to offer it because it is quite expensive by comparison with metformin. Worth your asking if you could try it if you can't quite manage by diet alone. Good luck.
     
  6. phillic

    phillic Type 2 · Newbie

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    :D Thanks to everyone for your replies. I am very greatful for all your help and advice.

    I have made an appointment to have my blood tests repeated and if I am still advised to take medication I will ask for a slow release form.

    I have actually fallen by the wayside this week and had several carb bingeing session . I have been feeling dreadfull, depressed and very angry.
    I think that proves that I need to steer clear of the carbs although it is quite difficult.

    One more question:-
    Over the past few weeks I have had sever itching (other than my psoriasis) on my arms, shoulders,chest, lower face and ears. Can this be contributed to high protein intake :?:

    Regards

    Christine
     
  7. garrycrone

    garrycrone Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi. Everyone will tell you that we all have a bad day with our medication and sometimes we all get angry over something. Dont worry, we all do it and it's what the forum is for; you can obtain some reassurance and sympathy and it makes the whole diabetes regime easier to deal with. I had awful trouble with Metformin for at least six months. In my case, I persevered and it has improved. Others I know have gone onto slow release which, whilst easier on the stomach, means they have had to be a bit more careful watching their bsl. Don't know why but like everything else with this condition, it's all a matter of balancing things. I take my Metformin mid-way through a meal and find this best with my stomach. It doesnt seem to effect my bsl so I choose to do it this way. If I take it on an empty stomach (rushing out to work, late, no breakfast - the usual hectic lifestyle we shouldnt be leading), the results can be best described as being "interesting" and I pray not to get caught in a traffic jam later in the day. I won't elaborate why as you seem familiar with the scenario.
    With regard to carbs etc, I simply eat less carbs than I used to, more veg, reasonable amounts of protein (chicken and fish) and as low fat as I can get away with without dying of food boredom- you need to live your life. On that note, make sure you have some treats. For me it is chinese take -away once a month. My bsl is bonkers the next morning but by lunch-time it has settled down a bit and by tea-time I am fine. Once a month I can cope with that and it beats a chicken salad after a tough week at work. You need to decide what is best for you as you go along. Remember it is all about balance and that includes the emotional highs and lows of life as well.
    Generally, if my bsl is higher one day, I simply knock the carbs off until it drops. I got a total load of twaddle from my dietician when I went (four years ago) and have, through the forum and the web, learnt a bit more about balancing my food intake. Small meals coupled with eating often helps me and I eat a lot of fruit and drink lots of water. If you are unsure, post a question. Someone usually has the answer. Good luck and take care
     
  8. phillic

    phillic Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thanks Garrycrone.
    I shall persevere and hope everything falls into place eventually.
    I suppose it's the same for most diabetics, I have days where I can accept it and stick to the regime and days where I just think "to hell with it all" but I know I'll have to get a grip if I'm going to beat this thing.

    Thanks again for you advice. :D
     
  9. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Christine,

    Skin irritation can often be a result of very high blood sugar levels, so is more likely the result of your "carbohydrate binging". I've never heard of itching resulting from eating protein.
     
  10. garrycrone

    garrycrone Type 2 · Active Member

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    Christine,

    I forgot to say, for years before I was diagnosed I had dry skin on my knees and elbows. It wasnt enough for me to go to the doctors over - I just lived with it. Once I had been diagnosed and I got my bsl under better control, the dry skin went away and hasnt returned. I can only put it down to better bsl and it being a by-product of high-sugar levels as we havent changed anything else eg washing powders or anything obvious. I don't know if anyone else has had similar experiences.
     
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