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Low carbing and heart disease connection

Discussion in 'Low Calorie Diets' started by Romola, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. Romola

    Romola · Well-Known Member

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  2. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    I've coppied this from an earlier post and deleted that as it seems to deserve a thread of its own

    As we read in your link the results of the study are why Prof. Rosenzweig no longer follows a low carb diet( so very appropriate for t the other thread) .
    I found this more detailed account with an extra bit of anecdote as to the reasons behind the study
    http://www.harvardscience.harvard.edu/m ... sel-growth

    Obviiously its very preliminary and what occurs in mice may not be replicated in humans.
    I imagine they could do a similar trial with humans using an echograph on the arteries to discover if there were similar changes.

    Edited to add, that it was interesting that the markers such as LDL and trigs were or lower for the low carb mice, compared with the Western diet mice, but the plaque was still greater.
    and
    abstract:http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2...ract?sid=350c87f9-b4d1-4f9e-b992-a82e4fc8b725
     
  3. IanD

    IanD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    From another thread:

     

    Attached Files:

  4. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    Ian, I pleased that your tests are OK.
    The reports on this thread are simply that. Neither posting on this thread has done anymore than report the findings. There is a far bigger discussion of this elsewhere so why post your results here?
    I have non invasive test reports (from echography) at diagnosis, 6 months, a year and since then every 2 years.
    My scans are now just a checkup, because the arteriologist is no longer concerned.There is far less plaque than at the outset, so I could say that what I do works very well for me . (I apppreciate I am very lucky that these tests were initiated, most people don't know the state of their arteries.)
    However, my individual results, since there are many possible explanations is of no more relevance than yours.
     
  5. gbswales

    gbswales · Well-Known Member

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    The Atkins diet has been surrounded by controversy for some years but always in relation to weight loss where very often people are trying for drastic results quickly. In my entirely non- medical opinion, sudden changes (and as frequent sudden reversals) to lifeystyle are not good for us. I am no expert as I have said but common sense is telling me that I still need to have a balanced diet, the only thing have changed is an emphasis on counting calories to one of couning carbs - however I have no inention of letting it become a "regime lifestyle". People who obsessively count calories are just as much at risk from lack of protein as too much. As well as reducing carbs it is still a good idea to avoid highly saturated fats, buy lean meat and make sure there is a healthy mix of fruit and veg.

    I am new to carbs but it is working for me - but I am not weighing everything or carrying round a carb dictionary with me - just sensibly looking at labels and making sensible guesses. I have just set myself a target of getting 95% of my readings below 9.5 and above 4.0 (I start to get mild hypo feelings around 4.0 and have found that while it can take several hours to drop from say 6.0 to 4.0 after that it drops more rapidly - so I err on the side of caution at the lower ranges)
     
  6. mullaneder

    mullaneder · Well-Known Member

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    maybe the names are too similar.is that why low carbers post in this section :?
     
  7. IanD

    IanD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Why the thread title? Obviously concerned with low carbing. TBH I just look at the thread titles - I don't notice the section.
     
  8. mullaneder

    mullaneder · Well-Known Member

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    ok ian fair enough why not remove your post then
     
  9. lionrampant

    lionrampant · Well-Known Member

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    You know this low vs. standard carb debate has gotten way out of hand.

    For type 2 diabetics low carb, even on paper, sounds like a good idea. Reduced ability to process sugar, solved by reducing the amount of sugar that requires processing.

    Type 1, it's a little more complex. Moreover, if you have your ratios worked out correctly, you don't have to low-carb if you don't want to.

    Differences resolved, go about your business citizen.
     
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