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Low Carbing in Paris

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by Charles Robin, May 11, 2014.

  1. Charles Robin

    Charles Robin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I am going to Paris for my first wedding anniversary at the end of this month. My french is not good, and I'm wondering how easy it is going to be to eat low carb while i'm there. Has anyone done the low carb gig in Paris (or in France in general?). If so, any tips greatly appreciated :).
     
  2. Madbazoo

    Madbazoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You shouldn't have a problem really. Get yourself a phrase book or even an app for your phone to help you with the food names.

    Most restaurants have a great selection of meats, chicken and fish but do watch out for the sauces. Vegetables and potatoes are usually served separately and not a lot of pasta or rice dishes to avoid. I can usually find at least one member of staff that speaks English and I have found chefs are much more accommodating.

    The French do eat a lot of bread, croissants etc but you should find cheeses and charcuterie available for breakfasts and light lunches.

    Hope this helps. Enjoy your trip to one of Europe's lovely capital cities, the perfect place to celebrate your anniversary.


    Type 2. Was out of control till I found this forum. Low Carb and testing saved me. Glucophage 1 per day down from 4. HBa1c down to 36
     
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  3. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    This might be some help, a French carb counter with some restaurant carb counts in it.
    http://chretiens.republicains.perso.neuf.fr/politique/sante/medtronic_aliments_&_glucides.pdf

    If you really want to low carb there are lots of large main course salads with very few carbs, you can normally get a steak with haricots vert (green beans) rather than frites, there are lots of dishes that don't actually have lots of carbs , so for eample a plateau de fruits de mer(shellfish) or some moules mariniere (mussels in white wine) have almost none (though moules normally come with frites and mayo) .
    If you want to eat al fresco, there are many traiteurs where you can buy cooked meats, fresh rotisseried chickens and pâté with various veg in vinaigrette dishes (plus of course cheeses but not always in the same shop) .
    There are lots of salad veggies available.
    Because, I'm not a low carber I would have bread with those but I go for artisan made nut breads, pain aux noix(walnuts) or pain aux amandes (almonds) or pain aux seigle (rye) You may also find pain aux lin (ie with linseed but that will be a mix of linseed and ordinary wholegrain or multigrain flour as are the others.) Typical 'French' baguette is very high GI (though is very light so not a huge number of carbs in each chunk)

    Desserts tend to be small and very rich so not nearly so sweet or so high carb as desserts in English restaurants. Even some fastish food restaurants will serve fruit but berries tend to have had sugar added.

    If you aren't in an 'international' hotel then breakfasts may be your biggest problem, even as a non low carber I take my own oatmeal and fruit with me when possible. There are apparently bars that will serve you hard boiled eggs in the morning, I've never noticed one.
     
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  4. Charles Robin

    Charles Robin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Amazing, thanks so much for the info! I'm going to go with a batch of low carb muffins baked for just in case, but it's good to know I should be able to find things to eat without too much difficulty. I have got myself a phrase book, but the advice above will be equally useful. Thanks again!
     
  5. Scandichic

    Scandichic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    All you need to do is use an online dictionary to translate the menu. Try www.wordreference.com
    Bonne chance!
     
  6. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I haven't low-carbed in France yet, but will be doing so this year in the Pays Basque in June. As we're hiring a gite, I can plan some of the meals in advance and even take some key ingredients as we're driving and might have a bit of room in the boot. But we will be eating out as well - on our way down, in hotels, and occasional restaurant meals to give us all a break from cooking.
    So, what to eat?
    Starters: Whole artichokes or avocados are sometimes offered as a starter with vinaigrette, no carb overload there probably. Olives are great, as are artichoke hearts and peppers in salads. Egg mayonnaise is usually very nice but it depends on the state of their mayonnaise. Usually better than British equivalent.
    Mains: Moules marinières, coq au vin, boeuf bourguignon, bouillabaisse (fish soup) might be on offer. All lovely, but watch out for croûtons sneaking up on the blind side. Hold the frites and order salade verte instead.
    Dessert : cheese board, no probs getting wonderful cheeses in France.

    A problem for me this year is that I'm well in to the habit of eating baguette with everything - I won't be doing that anymore!

    Bon appétit! Paris is so beautiful!
     
  7. sanguine

    sanguine Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can relate to that! We stayed in a gite in the Languedoc last June, before I was diagnosed, and looking back we ate mostly meat, grilled veg, salad and cheese which was fine. Maybe we should draw a large veil over the baguettes, croissants and wine though, at least in terms of the quantities!
     
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  8. SamJB

    SamJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I recently had a week in France. My French is basic, but I can get by (just about). I'm sure any French speaker will pick me up on this phrase, but it always worked.

    "Je ne mange pas pomme de terre, parce que Je suis diabetique, mais Je voidrais salade sil vous plais"

    "I don't eat potatoes because I'm diabetic, but I'd like salad please"

    Happy for Phoenix to correct me!
     
  9. Charles Robin

    Charles Robin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Excellent, thanks everyone. I feel a whole lot more prepared :)
     
  10. LizG

    LizG Parent · Active Member

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    Just so you know the word for carbohydrate in French is "Glucides"


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  11. Mushroom

    Mushroom · Well-Known Member

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    Went to area just south of Paris last week. Asked for salad instead of potatoes or rice. Waiters just think us ladies are watching our weight!
     
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